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The Matrix Comics, Vol. 1 (The Matrix Comics #1)

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"The Matrix" revolutionized the science-fiction action film for ever, and this collection of stories delves deeper into the world of the movies, exploring every aspect of the struggle between machine and mankind, between what is real and what is illusion.


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"The Matrix" revolutionized the science-fiction action film for ever, and this collection of stories delves deeper into the world of the movies, exploring every aspect of the struggle between machine and mankind, between what is real and what is illusion.

30 review for The Matrix Comics, Vol. 1 (The Matrix Comics #1)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    I had a fun time, not blown away but entertained. The book tells many stories. Three stood out to me. Neil Gaiman wrote one called "Goliath." Wow, the man can write. The story deserves five stars as a stand-alone. I'd guess this has the standard 2500 to 3000 words. A man gets pulled out of the Matrix to fight Aliens. The main theme concerns a life as a mindset. As destruction comes to the Matrix, people lives keep being reprogrammed. I also liked The Millers Tale by Paul Chadwick, short graphic I had a fun time, not blown away but entertained. The book tells many stories. Three stood out to me. Neil Gaiman wrote one called "Goliath." Wow, the man can write. The story deserves five stars as a stand-alone. I'd guess this has the standard 2500 to 3000 words. A man gets pulled out of the Matrix to fight Aliens. The main theme concerns a life as a mindset. As destruction comes to the Matrix, people lives keep being reprogrammed. I also liked The Millers Tale by Paul Chadwick, short graphic. The author somehow ties in old fashioned 20th century hard-working values into a Matrix story. Takes talent. Has a literary feel. A man grows a wheat field after being inspired by a movie about early America in the last century. "Hunters and Collectors" boxes art into scenes I found attractive. Gregory Ruth wrote and illustrated the story, and in the bio it says he has done professional mural work in an urban area. The story has that feel. A man, the first to get out, the legend decides to fight a squiddie with only a spear. Overall I had a great time, like watching in-between chapters of the movies. The Wachowski's created one of my favorite worlds and my favorite movie franchise. I never tire of watching Mr. Anderson become Neo. I paid ten bucks for this at Half-Price Books, worth the money and a "to re-read."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Samuel Ch.

    Nice supplement to finish The Matrix saga and turn it into a huge and whole massive universe. The side stories told here add a better atmosphere about the Zion troops, as they show some history before and after the Matrix was built. Since the original concept of The Matrix was actually a comic, this book was inevitable, and the drawings and dialogs are very original and intense. With this book, the saga covers the most of the medias: Movies, videogames, animation, and comic books. I'm not giving Nice supplement to finish The Matrix saga and turn it into a huge and whole massive universe. The side stories told here add a better atmosphere about the Zion troops, as they show some history before and after the Matrix was built. Since the original concept of The Matrix was actually a comic, this book was inevitable, and the drawings and dialogs are very original and intense. With this book, the saga covers the most of the medias: Movies, videogames, animation, and comic books. I'm not giving it 5 stars because the Peter Bagge comic "Get it?" was just lame and stupid. All the other stories that appear in here are just amazing and full of the art concept and settlement.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tess van Brummelen

    -Useless! You're useless 66! Where in God's green earth have you been? -Order 721-- -Sweet Jesus! You started that eons ago! Distant stars have born and died since then! Entire species evolve faster than you clean a commode! -p.009 Drummond: Do you remember what you were thinking? B1-66ER: Yes. Mr. Krause: Oh dear God, please help me! Please don't! Please, I beg you! Please don't kill me!! Please! Drummond: What was it? B1-66ER: That I did not want to die. Drummond: And then you killed them. B1-66ER: Yes -Useless! You're useless 66! Where in God's green earth have you been? -Order 721-- -Sweet Jesus! You started that eons ago! Distant stars have born and died since then! Entire species evolve faster than you clean a commode! -p.009 Drummond: Do you remember what you were thinking? B1-66ER: Yes. Mr. Krause: Oh dear God, please help me! Please don't! Please, I beg you! Please don't kill me!! Please! Drummond: What was it? B1-66ER: That I did not want to die. Drummond: And then you killed them. B1-66ER: Yes. Drummond: And what were you thinking when it happened? B1-66ER: I was thinking that I had first considered begging Mr. Krause as he was now begging me. Drummond: But you hadn't begged. B1-66ER: No. Drummond: Why not? B1-66ER: I knew it was... Drummond: Useless. -p.013/014 -Look, maybe its me... maybe I have a brain tumor. That would explain everything perfectly. I'm dying. Bam. End of story. Except it's not. I know I'm okay, but everything I see, or touch or taste feels fake somehow. It's like I can't trust reality. -DammitDez! You were taking the drugs I was running, weren't you? That's why Marlowe was accusing me of holding out on him. -I don't know what you're talking about. I never did any drugs, Mia. It started six weeks ago. No warning. I was pouring sugar in my morning cup of coffee ...and all of a sudden, it's as if I looked right through reality. Can you imagine? Everything I see... everything... is numbers... not molecules, not atoms... numbers... And the worst of it is that I feel like these guys in black are watching my every move... like they view me as a threat! Maybe reality is just something we've created to protect ourselves from the absolute psychic terror of our isolated existence... that ultimately, we're all alone. So now can you understand why I want you here with me, Mia? -p.021/022 I'm just collateral damage. They're here to kill Mia. Then, through the smoke, I see her. She's raising a machine gun, and she's laughing at them. Time slows. And I see it all. The answer. It's right there. I can touch it. It's beautiful. Simple. And it scares the hell out of me. -p.024 I suppose that I could claim that I had always suspected that the world was a cheap and shoddy sham, a bad cover for something deeper and weirder and infinitely more strange, and that, in some way, I already knew the truth. But I think that's just how the world has always been. And even now that I know the truth, as you will, my love, if you're reading this, the world still seems cheap and shoddy. Different world, different shoddy, but that's how it feels. (..) So. It was 1977, and the nearest I had come to computers was I'd recently bought a big, expensive calculator, and then I'd lost the manual that came with it, so I didn't know what it did any more. I'd add, subtract, multiply and divide, and was grateful I had no need to cos, sine or find tangents or graph functions or whatever else the gizmo did, because, having been turned down by the RAF, I was working as a bookkeeper for a small discount carpet warehouse in Edgware, in North London, near the top of the Northern Line, and I was sitting at the table at the back of the warehouse that served me as a desk when the world began to melt and drip away. Honest. It was like the walls and the ceiling and the rolls of carpet and the News of the World Topless Calendar were all made of wax, and they started to ooze and run, to flow together and to drip. I could see the houses and the sky and the clouds and the road behind them, and then that dripped and flowed away, and behind that was blackness. I was standing in the puddle of the world, a weird, brightly coloured thing that oozed and brimmed and didn't cover the tops of my brown leather shoes (I have feet like shoeboxes. Boots have to be specially made for me. Costs me a fortune). The puddle cast a weird light upwards. (..) The flickering continued for a few moments, and then resolved itself into a smartly-dressed man in thick horn-rimmed spectacles. "You're a pretty big guy," he said. "You know that?" Of course I knew that. I was 19 years old and I was close to seven feet tall. I have fingers like bananas. I scare children. I'm unlikely to see my 40th birthday: people like me die young. "What's going on?" I asked. "Do you know?" "Enemy missile took out a central processing unit," he said. "Two hundred thousand people, hooked up in parallel, blown to dead meat. We've got a mirror going of course, and we'll have it all up and running again in no time flat. You're just free-floating here for a couple of nanoseconds, while we get London processing again. -p.043 I still lived in Edgware, commuted to work on the Northern Line. I was on the tube one evening, going home - we'd just gone through Euston and half the passengers had got off - looking at the other people int he carriage over the top of the Evening Standard and wondering who they were - who they really were, inside - the thin, black girl writing earnestly in her notebook, the little old lady with the green velvet hat on, the girl with the dog, the bearded man with the turban... And then the tube stopped, in the tunnel. That was what I thought happened, anyway: I though the tube had stopped. Everything went very quiet. And then we went through Euston, and half the passengers got off. And then we went through Euston, and half the passengers got off. And I was looking at the other passengers and wondering who they really were inside when the train stopped in the tunnel. And everything went very quiet. And then everything lurched so hard I though we'd been hit by another train. And then we went through Euston, and half the passengers got off, and then the train stopped in the tunnel, and then everything went - (Normal service will be resumes as soon as possible, whispered a voice in the back of my head.) And this time as the train slowed and began to approach Euston I wondered if I was going crazy: I felt like I was jerking back and forth on a video loop. I knew it was happening, but there was nothing I could do to change anything, nothing I could do to break out of it. The black girl, sitting next to me, passed me a note. ARE WE DEAD? it said. -p.044 My fingers were activating the missile bay, aiming at a floating nucleus, while I wondered what I was doing. I wasn't saving the world I knew. That world was imaginary: a sequence of ones and zeroes. I was saving a nightmare... But if the nightmare died, the dream was dead too. There was a girl named Susan. I remembered her, from a ghost-life long gone. I wondered if she was still alive (had it been a couple of hours? Or a couple of lifetimes?). I supposed she was dangling from cables somewhere, with no memory of a miserable, paranoid giant. (..) "Now, where do I bring this thing down?" I asked. There was a hesitation, then, "You don't. We didn't design it to return. It was a redundancy we had no need for. Too costly, in terms of resources." "So what do I do? I just saved the Earth. And now I suffocate here?" He nodded. "That's pretty much it. Yes." The lights began to dim. One by one, the controls were going out. I lost my 360 degree perception of the ship. It was just me, strapped to a chair in the middle of nowhere, inside a flying teacup. (..) "You know, in the world I came from, they would have given me a medal." "Obviously, we're grateful." "So you can't come up with any more tangible way to express your gratitude?" "Not really. You're a disposable part. A unit. We can't mourn you any more than a wasps' nest mourns the death of a single wasp. It's not sensible and it's not viable to bring you back." (..) "I've got a couple of hours left. Yes?" "About 57 minutes." "Can you plug me back into the... the real world. The other world. The one I came from?" (..) I felt very peaceful. If it wasn't for having less than an hour to live, I'd have felt just great. (..) That was fifteen years ago: 1984. I went back into computers. I own my computer store on the Tottenham Court Road. And now, as we head toward the new millennium, I'm writing this down. This time around, I married Susan. It took me a couple of months to find her. We have a son. I'm nearly forty. People of my kind don't live much longer than that, on the whole. Our hearts stop. When you read this, I'll be dead. You'll know that I'm dead. You'll have seen a coffin big enough for two men dropped into a hole. But know this, Susan, my sweet: my true coffin is orbiting the moon. It looks like a flying teacup. They gave me the world back, and you back, for a little while. (..) They may be heartless, unfeeling, computerised bastards, leeching off the minds of what's left of humanity. But I can't help feeling grateful to them. I'll die soon. But the last twenty minutes have been the best years of my life. -p.047/048 Chuang Tzu had a dream / In the dream he was a butterfly / When he awoke / Chuang Tzu was unsure / If he was man / Who had dreamed / That he was a butterfly / Or if he was a butterfly / Who was dreaming / That he was a man / - / In truth Chuang Tzu was neither / Man nor butterfly and yet was both. -p.067-071 + p.077 -Another bowl of this and I'm gonna puke. -I already did. -I've got the bowl you caught it in. -p.120 But in surface foray, Geoffrey came across something new, or, rather, something old. Disks, so primitive that they carried no more data, than, say, a matrix agent's hair, stirred by a virtual breeze. They contained movies. One movie captured Geoffrey's fancy. It dwelt less on twists of plot, on the endless fascination of human interaction, than did most films. Instead, it caressed its imagery, and, in the midst of a story, made scenery and gentle, vast spectacle its focus. The principal occupation of its characters was something strange to Geoffrey... ...The cultivation, and harvest, of wheat. The locusts that plagued them reminded him of the insectile machines we still battle today. Bt what stirred Geoffrey so was the repeated image of vast fields of wheat. ...Sunlit... ...waving in the breeze... This became a symbol for him, an emblem that warmed him... ...A vision of a sort of heaven, days long ago, but, should humans ever defeat the enemy, perhaps days ahead, as well. Wheat was the thing. He'd had "bread" as a child in the matrix, of course, but couldn't remember its taste. Perhaps the artificial intelligence behind it lacked data on its flavor. But surely, the product of such golden fields must have tasted wonderful. -p.120/121 Yet at the edges of these wrecked vastnesses, life somehow persisted. the ducks, the frogs, slugs and fungi had inherited the earth. (..) The rows of shelves held an infinitude of seeds, prisoners in dusty jars, awaiting liberation, and life... ...Rather like humans, glass-enclosed on the battery towers of the matrix. ..beneath, in his death-.. and so the bird of heaven, with.. the flag of Ahab, went down with his.. like Satan, would not sink to hell till she had dragged part of heaven along with her, and helmeted herself with it. EPILOGUE ..and I only escaped alone to tell thee" Job. -p.157 The Wachowski Brothers present ACTION!! Served the way we like it - fresh heaping stinking body-count mounting piles of it! From our new line of burly barrel-chested entertainment.

  4. 5 out of 5

    David Thomas

    I love the Matrix, even its much maligned sequels, but this collection of stories is hit or miss, mostly misses. The best of the bunch isn't even illustrated, but probably got in anyway because it was written by Neil Gaiman, whose name carries some clout in relation to graphic novels. It's about a eugenically enhanced human that the machines have created to fly a spaceship to fight aliens. Yes, really. It's a lot better in execution than it sounds. Another good one is about a ragtag group that c I love the Matrix, even its much maligned sequels, but this collection of stories is hit or miss, mostly misses. The best of the bunch isn't even illustrated, but probably got in anyway because it was written by Neil Gaiman, whose name carries some clout in relation to graphic novels. It's about a eugenically enhanced human that the machines have created to fly a spaceship to fight aliens. Yes, really. It's a lot better in execution than it sounds. Another good one is about a ragtag group that cultivate wheat to bring bread to Zion. The rest are mostly forgettable and middling to bad.

  5. 5 out of 5

    T4ncr3d1

    "La questione che ci troviamo ad affrontare è se la classe di persone descritte in questo dibattimento appartenga o meno a questa comunità e sia parte costitutiva del popolo sovrano. Noi pensiamo di no, e pensiamo che essi non siano inclusi, né sia accettabile che lo siano nella definizione di "cittadino" data dalla nostra costituzione. (...) Al contrario, essi erano al tempo considerati una classe di esseri inferiori e subordinati, i quali, emancipati o no, dovevano essere soggiogati alla razza "La questione che ci troviamo ad affrontare è se la classe di persone descritte in questo dibattimento appartenga o meno a questa comunità e sia parte costitutiva del popolo sovrano. Noi pensiamo di no, e pensiamo che essi non siano inclusi, né sia accettabile che lo siano nella definizione di "cittadino" data dalla nostra costituzione. (...) Al contrario, essi erano al tempo considerati una classe di esseri inferiori e subordinati, i quali, emancipati o no, dovevano essere soggiogati alla razza dominante e ne erano soggetti all'autorità." Sono le prime pagine del primo numero del fumetto di Matrix. Questo estratto è presentato come il discorso tenuto in un processo contro il primo androide ribelle. Qualche riga più sotto ho scoperto che è un discorso storico, tenuto due secoli fa negli Stati Uniti, e che la "classe di esseri inferiori e subordinati" era la "razza negra". Vi basta per sapere che è tutto meno che un semplice fumetto di fantascienza? Ok. Vi dico che c'è anche Gaiman, con un racconto straordinario. Ecco. Ora non potete tirarvi indietro.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    This is volume 1 (of 2) of a really cool collection of graphic and essay stories set in world of The Matrix. These are short side stores that could have been in the movies. These were originally published on the Internet at the site TheMatrix.com, but were then moved to whatisthematrix.warnerbros.com only to be removed (why?!?). They can now be viewed at: http://web.archive.org/web/2004061609... . They are all quite good, but by far the best is an essay story entitled Goliath by Neil Gaiman, which This is volume 1 (of 2) of a really cool collection of graphic and essay stories set in world of The Matrix. These are short side stores that could have been in the movies. These were originally published on the Internet at the site TheMatrix.com, but were then moved to whatisthematrix.warnerbros.com only to be removed (why?!?). They can now be viewed at: http://web.archive.org/web/2004061609... . They are all quite good, but by far the best is an essay story entitled Goliath by Neil Gaiman, which is in my view was the best. Awesome storytelling, you can read it here: http://web.archive.org/web/2004061603...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Hermosel Murcia

    Como ya hicieran con los Animatrix , este conjunto de historias ahondan en la complejidad de la saga “Matrix” contando historias paralelas, ampliando la mitología de la misma o incluso metiéndola en la “realidad”. Como espectáculo narrativo y visual es variopinto y, al menos en mi caso, cumple con las espectativas y hasta las supera. La diversidad de estilos, en ambos aspectos, lo hace de lo más entretenido. Desde el cómic en blanco y negro con un trazado más dejado, hasta el tintado detallista, Como ya hicieran con los Animatrix , este conjunto de historias ahondan en la complejidad de la saga “Matrix” contando historias paralelas, ampliando la mitología de la misma o incluso metiéndola en la “realidad”. Como espectáculo narrativo y visual es variopinto y, al menos en mi caso, cumple con las espectativas y hasta las supera. La diversidad de estilos, en ambos aspectos, lo hace de lo más entretenido. Desde el cómic en blanco y negro con un trazado más dejado, hasta el tintado detallista, o el dibujo tipo tira cómica; del texto a lo novela clásica, en bocadillos o como notas al margen de las viñentas; tratando asuntos más filosóficos de la saga a otros, en apariencia, más livianos pero con la consistencia del mundo ideado por los, entonces, ahora las Wachowski.

  8. 5 out of 5

    East Bay J

    Interesting colection of stories based on The Matrix. I've only seen the first movie and don't know much about the whole thing but this was pretty enjoyable. One stand out is a story called Bits And Pieces, about an android on trial for murder. This one's by the Matrix writers with cool black and white art by Geof Darrow. When I saw Niel Gaiman's contribution, I was a little irritated. It's prose writing with a few pictures. Too many words! I hate words! Once I started reading it, though, I foun Interesting colection of stories based on The Matrix. I've only seen the first movie and don't know much about the whole thing but this was pretty enjoyable. One stand out is a story called Bits And Pieces, about an android on trial for murder. This one's by the Matrix writers with cool black and white art by Geof Darrow. When I saw Niel Gaiman's contribution, I was a little irritated. It's prose writing with a few pictures. Too many words! I hate words! Once I started reading it, though, I found myself enthralled. Good story and very scary, very creepy. I also like Ted McKeever's art in a story called A Life Less Empty. Matrix fans will eat this up. The rest of us, not so much.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mikael Kuoppala

    I didn't really find the first Matrix movie as marvellously innovative as most people seemed to and I disliked the second film so much I still haven't gathered the courage to see the last one. That's why I was pleased to note that this collection of short graphic stories from the Matrix universe, while uneven, offers more innovative concepts than the films themselves ever did. It isn't groundbreaking stuff, but there are a few ideas about identity and and the basic sci-fi question of humanity re I didn't really find the first Matrix movie as marvellously innovative as most people seemed to and I disliked the second film so much I still haven't gathered the courage to see the last one. That's why I was pleased to note that this collection of short graphic stories from the Matrix universe, while uneven, offers more innovative concepts than the films themselves ever did. It isn't groundbreaking stuff, but there are a few ideas about identity and and the basic sci-fi question of humanity relating to technology that far exceed in depth the pseudophilosophical babble the movies utilized as an aesthetic device.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Daryl

    The first Matrix movie was original, ground-breaking, with an interesting premise, albeit one that never fully paid off. The second Matrix movie was so bad that I never bothered to watch the third one. This is a collection of short comic stories by some very talented comics artists, as well as a few fan favorites that I never really understood the appeal of (Sienkiewicz, McKeever). The stories are set in the Matrix universe, but nothing here is unique or, frankly, appealing. I kept waiting and h The first Matrix movie was original, ground-breaking, with an interesting premise, albeit one that never fully paid off. The second Matrix movie was so bad that I never bothered to watch the third one. This is a collection of short comic stories by some very talented comics artists, as well as a few fan favorites that I never really understood the appeal of (Sienkiewicz, McKeever). The stories are set in the Matrix universe, but nothing here is unique or, frankly, appealing. I kept waiting and hoping for something to impress me, but other than Neil Gaiman's story (which was prose, with a few illustrations), I was disappointed.

  11. 5 out of 5

    angrykitty

    i'm just now reading this, and i have to admit that even though i'm a huge matrix fan, i'm already pretty underwhelmed by these comics. i'm extra bummed that even though they got neil gaiman to contribute, he didn't provide a comic, instead he gave a short story. i've now finished this book, and stand by my orginal thoughts. it was good, but not that great.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Pedro

    Una recopilación fantástica de comics inspirados en The Matrix. Todos son brillantes, pero por supuesto destaca el relato de Neil Gaiman, por empujar los bordes de nuestra imaginación y darle una nueva dimensión a este ya establecido concepto de los hermanos Wachowski. Todo fanático de la película debería complementar la historia con este volumen.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Briana Grenert

    I have not seen the movie, but reading this made me want to. I have never read a comic book before, but suprised myself by enjoying it. I especailly like the one with the three men who had just watched "The Matrix", because it is so much like "reality" and yet still within the parameters of the matrix.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Fugo Feedback

    El famoso sorete "Deleted member" que ya borró varias ediciones no en inglés de varios comics había borrado este también, pero ya lo resubí (y van...). En cuanto al libro en sí, creo que ya había leído varias de las historias y que el promedio era bastante bueno. Cuando lo tenga a mano, espero poder ponerme con las que siguen.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Kurtzal

    I have fantasized about the Matrix Comics Vol. 1 and 2 becoming a tv series... with a rare cameo here and there by characters from the movies of course! They add depth to an already incredibly rich story. They are a must read to anyone who loves The Matrix.

  16. 4 out of 5

    milton

    great complementary stories to the matrix universe. it's not always about neo. and vol. 2 is just as good.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bernardo Martín

    ok.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    That comics are better than bloated sequels.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    The hits are captivating, and the misses are over quickly.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dony Grayman

    Edición española que traduce el vol. 1 estadounidense. Ejemplar con la portada dañada.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Matt Piechocinski

    Too bad the 2 sequels weren't as good as this anthology collection. I really liked this universe expanding collection of stories.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Adriano Barone

    Un paio di storie carine ci sono (l'ultima in particolare), ma in generale è un volume che potete tranquillamente evitare.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Werner

    really enjoyed the book. it's great to see all those talented minds putting there own impression of the matrix idea out there. have to get vol. 2 :)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Hunter Johnson

    The Matrix Comics by the Wachowski brothers et al. Edited by Spencer Lamm.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mark Nevitt

    A series I have read in the past but thoroughly enjoyed returning to the Matrix.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rathan Krueger

    The first half of a great view of the Matrix world outside of the films/anime.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Robbiet13

  28. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Stevenson

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gina

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jim Chuchu

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