Anne of Avonlea by L. M. Montgomery, Fiction, Classics, Family, Girls & Women (Anne of Green Gables #2) - Download Free Ebook Now
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Anne of Avonlea by L. M. Montgomery, Fiction, Classics, Family, Girls & Women (Anne of Green Gables #2)

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If you came down to harsh facts -- which, it must be confessed, Anne of Avonlea seldom did until she had to -- it did not seem likely that there was much promising material for celebrities in Avonlea school; but you could never tell what might happen if a teacher used her influence for good. Anne had certain rose-tinted ideals of what a teacher might accomplish if she only If you came down to harsh facts -- which, it must be confessed, Anne of Avonlea seldom did until she had to -- it did not seem likely that there was much promising material for celebrities in Avonlea school; but you could never tell what might happen if a teacher used her influence for good. Anne had certain rose-tinted ideals of what a teacher might accomplish if she only went the right way about it; and she was in the midst of a delightful scene, forty years hence, with a famous personage . . . just exactly what he was to be famous for was left in convenient haziness, but Anne thought it would be rather nice to have him a college president or a Canadian premier . . . bowing low over her wrinkled hand and assuring her that it was she who had first kindled his ambition and that all his success in life was due to the lessons she had instilled so long ago in Avonlea school.


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If you came down to harsh facts -- which, it must be confessed, Anne of Avonlea seldom did until she had to -- it did not seem likely that there was much promising material for celebrities in Avonlea school; but you could never tell what might happen if a teacher used her influence for good. Anne had certain rose-tinted ideals of what a teacher might accomplish if she only If you came down to harsh facts -- which, it must be confessed, Anne of Avonlea seldom did until she had to -- it did not seem likely that there was much promising material for celebrities in Avonlea school; but you could never tell what might happen if a teacher used her influence for good. Anne had certain rose-tinted ideals of what a teacher might accomplish if she only went the right way about it; and she was in the midst of a delightful scene, forty years hence, with a famous personage . . . just exactly what he was to be famous for was left in convenient haziness, but Anne thought it would be rather nice to have him a college president or a Canadian premier . . . bowing low over her wrinkled hand and assuring her that it was she who had first kindled his ambition and that all his success in life was due to the lessons she had instilled so long ago in Avonlea school.

30 review for Anne of Avonlea by L. M. Montgomery, Fiction, Classics, Family, Girls & Women (Anne of Green Gables #2)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

    I LOVE ANNE SO MUCH. This book was a great continuation of her story and I love seeing Anne and her friends start to become adults while still keeping their fantastic personalities. Gilbert is also my fave forever especially because he is WAITING FOR HER without expecting anything beyond friendship - though he is still hopeful, he's more concerned about being a man worthy of her while being her friend, not convincing her he's a "nice guy".

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I was more enchanted by this book the first time I read it. More recently, I was put off by the description of the pair of twins Anne and Marilla adopt: Davy and Dora. Davy is a handful, asking impossible questions, getting into trouble and so forth. Dora is quiet and well-behaved. Anne and Marilla love Davy more (by their own words). The idea is repeated three or four times. Good little Dora is respectable, obedient, predictable and boring; she just doesn't need as much attention and direction a I was more enchanted by this book the first time I read it. More recently, I was put off by the description of the pair of twins Anne and Marilla adopt: Davy and Dora. Davy is a handful, asking impossible questions, getting into trouble and so forth. Dora is quiet and well-behaved. Anne and Marilla love Davy more (by their own words). The idea is repeated three or four times. Good little Dora is respectable, obedient, predictable and boring; she just doesn't need as much attention and direction as Davy does, and thus is less lovable. I found this idea actually repulsive. I kept thinking it would serve Anne and Marilla right if little Dora -predictable, obedient, second class Dora- shaved her head, pierced her nipple, got pregnant and ran off with a Hell's Angel, just because she figured out that the trouble maker rated higher in their affections. Aren't they familiar with the saying "still waters run deep?" Someone has to care enough about this quiet, obedient, seemingly unimaginative person to find out what her interests and passions are.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jessica ❁ ➳ Silverbow ➳ ❁ Rabid Reads-no-more

    It's almost worse now that Anne and Gilbert are actually friends. *rubs fist over heart* BUT. I will persevere!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Melki

    Ahhhh! This was exactly what I needed . . . the long soak in a hot tub, the breath of fresh air, the perfect antidote to the hatred and venom spewed by the racist, rabid yam currently running for President. Yes, after a week of watching a 70-year-old toddler throw daily tantrums, it was so refreshing to pick up this book and escape to a world where you could stumble upon a stranger's house and be invited in for tea. This volume concentrates on Anne's two years spent teaching. There are good days a Ahhhh! This was exactly what I needed . . . the long soak in a hot tub, the breath of fresh air, the perfect antidote to the hatred and venom spewed by the racist, rabid yam currently running for President. Yes, after a week of watching a 70-year-old toddler throw daily tantrums, it was so refreshing to pick up this book and escape to a world where you could stumble upon a stranger's house and be invited in for tea. This volume concentrates on Anne's two years spent teaching. There are good days and bad days as she attempts to mold the young minds of Avonlea. Newly orphaned twins - the lifeless Dora and the way-too-lively Davy - come to live with lifelong spinster Marilla, prompting Mrs. Rachel Lynde to quip, "You're never safe from being surprised till you're dead." A local kook successfully predicts a wicked storm, and the Village Improvement Society, a group spearheaded by Anne and Diana to spruce up Avonlea, is born. Love and laughs abound, and yes, it's sappy as hell, but as I said, exactly what I needed. I have a feeling I'm going to be rereading the rest of this series before November rolls around. It's so nice to know that when I wake with a 3 AM panic attack, convinced that Trump has already won and life as we know it is over, that Anne's simple, and simply beautiful, world will be waiting for me.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cait • A Page with a View

    3.5 stars. The first book is one of my all-time favorites and I have no idea why it's taken me so long to get to the sequels! I really don't think I had too high of expectations, but am still pretty surprised by how neutral I was about this second one. I was mostly just there for Anne's personality, all of the wonderful quotes scattered throughout, and Gilbert Blythe. Otherwise, I didn't really care much about all of the random side stories (especially with the twins and Miss Lavendar). It felt 3.5 stars. The first book is one of my all-time favorites and I have no idea why it's taken me so long to get to the sequels! I really don't think I had too high of expectations, but am still pretty surprised by how neutral I was about this second one. I was mostly just there for Anne's personality, all of the wonderful quotes scattered throughout, and Gilbert Blythe. Otherwise, I didn't really care much about all of the random side stories (especially with the twins and Miss Lavendar). It felt more like filler? But if I don't compare this to the first book then it's still a fine read. I think I just like the story in the second movie a lot more. Also, this NEEDS MORE GILBERT. That is all.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    "In the twilight Anne sauntered down to the Dryad's Bubble and saw Gilbert Blythe coming down through the dusky Haunted Wood. She had a sudden realization that Gilbert was a schoolboy no longer. And how manly he looked—the tall, frank-faced fellow, with the clear, straightforward eyes and the broad shoulders. Anne thought Gilbert was a very handsome lad, even though he didn't look at all like her ideal man. She and Diana had long ago decided what kind of a man they admired and their tastes seeme "In the twilight Anne sauntered down to the Dryad's Bubble and saw Gilbert Blythe coming down through the dusky Haunted Wood. She had a sudden realization that Gilbert was a schoolboy no longer. And how manly he looked—the tall, frank-faced fellow, with the clear, straightforward eyes and the broad shoulders. Anne thought Gilbert was a very handsome lad, even though he didn't look at all like her ideal man. She and Diana had long ago decided what kind of a man they admired and their tastes seemed exactly similar. He must be very tall and distinguished looking, with melancholy, inscrutable eyes, and a melting, sympathetic voice. There was nothing either melancholy or inscrutable in Gilbert's physiognomy, but of course that didn't matter in friendship! Gilbert stretched himself out on the ferns beside the Bubble and looked approvingly at Anne. If Gilbert had been asked to describe his ideal woman the description would have answered point for point to Anne, even to those seven tiny freckles whose obnoxious presence still continued to vex her soul. Gilbert was as yet little more than a boy; but a boy has his dreams as have others, and in Gilbert's future there was always a girl with big, limpid gray eyes, and a face as fine and delicate as a flower. He had made up his mind, also, that his future must be worthy of its goddess. Even in quiet Avonlea there were temptations to be met and faced. White Sands youth were a rather "fast" set, and Gilbert was popular wherever he went. But he meant to keep himself worthy of Anne's friendship and perhaps some distant day her love; and he watched over word and thought and deed as jealously as if her clear eyes were to pass in judgment on it. She held over him the unconscious influence that every girl, whose ideals are high and pure, wields over her friends; an influence which would endure as long as she was faithful to those ideals and which she would as certainly lose if she were ever false to them. In Gilbert's eyes Anne's greatest charm was the fact that she never stooped to the petty practices of so many of the Avonlea girls—the small jealousies, the little deceits and rivalries, the palpable bids for favor. Anne held herself apart from all this, not consciously or of design, but simply because anything of the sort was utterly foreign to her transparent, impulsive nature, crystal clear in its motives and aspirations." "Perhaps, after all, romance did not come into one's life with pomp and blare, like a gay knight riding down; perhaps it crept to one's side like an old friend through quiet ways; perhaps it revealed itself in seeming prose, until some sudden shaft of illumination flung athwart its pages betrayed the rhythm and the music, perhaps. . . perhaps. . .love unfolded naturally out of a beautiful friendship, as a golden-hearted rose slipping from its green sheath." ...oh, Gilbert Blythe...<3

  7. 5 out of 5

    Manybooks

    I remember liking L.M. Montgomery's Anne of Avonlea immensely when I first read it as a young teenager, and during my recent rereads, I still managed to enjoy most of the story (most of the featured episodes) as much as I did then, especially the anecdotes about the Avonlea Village Improvement Society (AVIS). But even more than the AVIS anecdotes, I have been rather pleasantly surprised at how much I have loved reading about both Paul Irving and Lavendar Lewis (two characters to whom I did not r I remember liking L.M. Montgomery's Anne of Avonlea immensely when I first read it as a young teenager, and during my recent rereads, I still managed to enjoy most of the story (most of the featured episodes) as much as I did then, especially the anecdotes about the Avonlea Village Improvement Society (AVIS). But even more than the AVIS anecdotes, I have been rather pleasantly surprised at how much I have loved reading about both Paul Irving and Lavendar Lewis (two characters to whom I did not really feel all that drawn when I first read the novel). However, I did and do find myself having rather major problems universally liking the character of Davy Keith. And it is not Davy's mischievous nature that I find problematic, but the fact that he is so often deliberately cruel to his twin sister Dora. Not only that, but I have also and with flustered sadness noticed that Dora is more often than not ignored and denigrated by almost everyone, from Anne to even Mrs. Lynde, simply because she is a quiet, unobtrusive child (and "must" therefore by extension also be monotonous). And when one recalls what Anne's own childhood was like, and how she was both emotionally and spiritually neglected before she came to Green Gables, it is supremely ironic and annoying that Anne now seemingly neglects Dora in a similar manner, often ignoring her because Davy's exploits are more interesting, or more to the point, are perceived as being more interesting. Furthermore, I also tend to believe that there is actually a rather uncritical acceptance by L. M. Montgomery herself, as Anne's (and others') neglect and critical assumptions of and towards Dora are never really actively criticised (yes, Anne realises that she might have a bit of an unfair and careless attitude towards Dora, but even though she is aware of this, she does not really ever strive to rein in her at times quite overt favouritism of Davy, and actually even attempts to justify it to herself and others). As someone who was rather quiet and unobtrusive as a child and as a teenager, this has quite bothered me during my recent rereads and still somewhat chafes (strangely enough though, when I was a teenager, when I first read Anne of Avonlea, this fact did not seem to bother me all that much, although at that time, I often did feel rather ignored and under-appreciated by both my family and the world). Now I would still most strongly recommend this book, as well as the entire Anne of Green Gables series, it is just that Anne of Avonlea, while indeed magical, does have its issues (at least it did and does for me) with specifically the often overt favouritism of Davy Keith over his sister, a favouritism made worse by the fact that it also so often seems universally accepted, even justified (and thus, from the Anne of Green Gables series, Anne of Avonlea does definitely not rank amongst my favourites).

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Anne of Avonlea drinking game: Take a drink of your tea/soda/plum wine every time -Anne's grey eyes are mentioned -Marilla is sarcastic -Paul Irving says "you know" -Paul Iriving refers to his "little mother" -Diana's weight is mentioned -Anne or Marilla express their preference for Davy/speak unkindly of Dora because she's "too good." The character of Davy just about ruined this book for me. I kind of hated him. His sister, Dora, is a sweet, mild-mannered, overall good kid. And so Davy takes great joy Anne of Avonlea drinking game: Take a drink of your tea/soda/plum wine every time -Anne's grey eyes are mentioned -Marilla is sarcastic -Paul Irving says "you know" -Paul Iriving refers to his "little mother" -Diana's weight is mentioned -Anne or Marilla express their preference for Davy/speak unkindly of Dora because she's "too good." The character of Davy just about ruined this book for me. I kind of hated him. His sister, Dora, is a sweet, mild-mannered, overall good kid. And so Davy takes great joy in tormenting her endlessly. But Anne and Marilla just write this off as him being "mischievous," never taking into consideration how awful this must be for Dora. Davy even locks his sister alone in the dark in a neighbor's barn, just because he thinks it would be funny to make everyone worry(!?). When Dora is finally found, she's been crying for hours. The end result of this episode? Anne and Marilla say they love Davy more because he needs them more. No, Dora needs them to protect her - from her brother. And they utterly fail. Anne's "scrapes" in the first book were because she often acted before thinking, or had a quick temper. But Davy's actions are thought out and deliberate, and he does them because he likes making trouble, making his sister cry, and getting a reaction out of people. Very, very different, imo. In addition, this book felt a lot more sickly-sweet and moralized more. It wasn't nearly as good as the first (isn't that always the way?), and I don't think I'll continue on with the series, even though I did want to see Anne and Gilbert get together.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lana

    I'm not a violent person, but if I could punch any literary character in the face it would be $%^&*[email protected] Davy.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Evelina | AvalinahsBooks

    After the first book about Anne, I was a bit late to read this one. That's mostly due to the fact that at first it completely failed to draw me in. I felt like it's just filler up to like a third of the book in! Where's all the fun? Where did Anne's spunkiness go? But thankfully, the book picked up, and by the end I can say I enjoyed it almost as much as the first one. I'll certainly be reading on! I've decided to give you 5 reasons to read about Anne, so here we go. If you want to read this w After the first book about Anne, I was a bit late to read this one. That's mostly due to the fact that at first it completely failed to draw me in. I felt like it's just filler up to like a third of the book in! Where's all the fun? Where did Anne's spunkiness go? But thankfully, the book picked up, and by the end I can say I enjoyed it almost as much as the first one. I'll certainly be reading on! I've decided to give you 5 reasons to read about Anne, so here we go. If you want to read this with proper formatting, go ahead and read it here on my blog. The Shenanigans The funny scrapes Anne gets into is part of the fun in stories about her. So at first, as I was reading it, I was so baffled by the fact that Anne grew up – a school mistress now, what fun is there even going to be?? At first it does go like that, but it picks up, and you've got Anne traipsing around Green Gables making a fool of herself as always. Hilarity ensues. (I won't be kidding when I say I literally laughed out loud about the roof scene. Good lord.) The Kids There are a lot of children in this book, and if you've read Montgomery before, you'll know that she is great at writing them. From the best to the worst - you'll find kids with a heart, kids with a brain, and kids that basically crawled their way up from hell (I'm looking at you, Davy Keith.) Good or bad, they are truly entertaining to read about and something chug out some quite deep thoughts. (Although I was a little sad Dora was so disregarded because she was 'too good and docile') The Romance Oh, the romance. If you're thinking anything finally happens between Anne and Gilbert – well, think again. But Montgomery has some other romance to offer, and it's truly adorable in the way it can be only from this particular time - the turn of the century. So innocent, so beautiful and lovely, so plainly obviously orchestrated - in a way that makes you like it even more. Swoon! The Feel I will risk repeating myself, but I can't take away from the book. Anne of Avonlea will let you enjoy another "episode" oh the calm and quiet that you loved when you were reading the first book. Most of us long for something like that... once we get old and overworked enough, I suppose. The promise of green, rolling fields, sunshine and flowers picked in the field............. The Promise For More As it's the second book, you're getting into a sort of pleasant sync with the story. And you don't want it to end. The ending of Anne of Avonlea promises our heroine a nice, bright future just round the bend, and you'll want to find out all about it. It reminds me the time I was going off to university myself, off to a new start, to a life I knew nothing about. So let's hope that it will be as Anne would probably hope it would be: So that's why I think you should continue with this series! It might be slow to start, but it gets good afterwards. I'm sure you'll enjoy it if you pick it up. Read Post On My Blog | My Bookstagram | Bookish Twitter

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Hackett (SuperSpaceChick)

    I can't even put into words how much I adore this series<3

  12. 5 out of 5

    Britany

    OH Marilla! Anne's back! She older and wiser and more beautiful than that gangly red-headed girl that first came to Avonlea. This book walks us through Anne as a older teenager, she's back as a schoolteacher at the local school with difficult pupils, she refuses to rule by corporal punishment, but simply to treat her students with kindness. Marilla ends up adopting two twins who are orphaned- Dora & Davy and little Davy just stole my heart in this story. My other favorite was Miss Lavender a OH Marilla! Anne's back! She older and wiser and more beautiful than that gangly red-headed girl that first came to Avonlea. This book walks us through Anne as a older teenager, she's back as a schoolteacher at the local school with difficult pupils, she refuses to rule by corporal punishment, but simply to treat her students with kindness. Marilla ends up adopting two twins who are orphaned- Dora & Davy and little Davy just stole my heart in this story. My other favorite was Miss Lavender and her story. Another batch of Anne was just what I needed to break up some of the deeper, darker reading out there right now. I must confess after reading Anne of Green Gables, I was enthralled. I then did watch Anne with an E on Netflix and became HOOKED! Cannot wait to now continue on with the series as all kindred spirits must.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    I loved the book Anne of Green Gables so much. I enjoyed this book, but it did not have the same impact on me that the first one did. There was much about this book that I loved, but I did miss Anne as a child. She is becoming an adult, a better adult than most. I did love the hilarious things the children said. I mean they were things I could hear any child saying. Davey was a little crazy. That kid has some sociopathic tendencies. Still, he was so funny. He enjoyed causing some excitement aroun I loved the book Anne of Green Gables so much. I enjoyed this book, but it did not have the same impact on me that the first one did. There was much about this book that I loved, but I did miss Anne as a child. She is becoming an adult, a better adult than most. I did love the hilarious things the children said. I mean they were things I could hear any child saying. Davey was a little crazy. That kid has some sociopathic tendencies. Still, he was so funny. He enjoyed causing some excitement around that place. It was pretty amazing. Davey's poor sister though was so boring even the adults thought she was boring. Paul was another good student. I liked him. He was very Anne-like. The children were the highlight of the book. Lucy Montgomery really know how to write children. It is her gift. Anne is a teacher at like 16 going on 17. She teaches for one year before she is going on to college. This is the year that the book covers. She is a young teacher. She also doesn't want to squash the imagination and hopes of children. She wants to befriend them instead of corporeal punishment. That is funny too as everyone keeps telling her to beat the children. I thought the book was a little long in places and the story dragged a little. I am also used to a faster pace thanks to modern literature. It's nice to slow down the pace of story and read something different. Still, the language does cast a spell and Prince Edward Island seems magical. I look forward to reading the next one. This is a wonderful series.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Celeste

    Full review now posted! Anne of Green Gables is one of my favorite books ever. But the story doesn’t stop there! I’ve never read the entire series, so I’m on a mission to do just that. This second installment I have read before, and I love it just as much as the preceding book. Here, Anne takes her first halting steps into adulthood, and the change is both charming and sad. Anne will always be a free spirit, but seeing her temper that spiritedness enough to become an effective teacher was fascina Full review now posted! Anne of Green Gables is one of my favorite books ever. But the story doesn’t stop there! I’ve never read the entire series, so I’m on a mission to do just that. This second installment I have read before, and I love it just as much as the preceding book. Here, Anne takes her first halting steps into adulthood, and the change is both charming and sad. Anne will always be a free spirit, but seeing her temper that spiritedness enough to become an effective teacher was fascinating to behold. I’ve always loved schoolmarm stories. There’s something about one-room schoolhouses and having to teach to so many age groups simultaneously that blows my mind. I’m a teacher, but I can’t even fathom having to teach every subject to every age group every single day. I don’t know how teachers of the past did it. The thing is, I know that if I had lived in the same time period, I would have sought out to do exactly that. Though it was undoubtedly hard work, there’s a romance to being a schoolmarm that has always appealed to me. Because of this, I love reading about school teachers of the past. I have to say, Anne Shirley made a remarkable schoolmarm. She’s kind and thoughtful and is just barely out of childhood herself, so she remembers what it’s like to be on the other side of the blackboard, so to speak. All of those traits coupled with her renowned imagination means that Anne can relate to her students better than most, and that she finds new and unique methods of teaching them. One of my favorite parts of this book was the introduction of two new little boys: Paul Irving and Davy. I don’t think you could possibly find two more radically different boys in real life or in fiction. Paul Irving is a sweet, smart, thoughtful boy with an imagination that rivals Anne’s, and he and Anne are undoubtedly kindred spirits. Davy is a spitfire, a rambunctious boy with the greatest propensity for questioning I’ve ever seen. And the questions that boy comes up with! There’s no way I could’ve kept a straight face while trying to answer some of those questions. Though both boys are as different as can be, they’re both incredibly dear to Anne. In this book we also visit Echo Lodge for the first time and meet Miss Lavendar, another kindred spirit. Miss Lavendar is an old maid unlike any other. She refuses to go gently into spinsterhood, and has instead built a beautiful if lonely life for herself. Echo Lodge is beautiful and magical, almost like a fairy realm. And Miss Lavendar makes a stunning fairy queen; the only way you could guess her age is by her snow-white hair. She’s just as imaginative as Anne, and she gets a wonderful happy ending in this book. The book ends with Anne and Gilbert both deciding to head off to college. Even though I love knowing where their story is heading (after all, theirs is often billed as one of the greatest romances in fiction), I’m loving every second of the journey. It’s so nice to have a romantic element that isn’t instantaneous, but instead builds over the course of multiple books. Romance when approached this way just feels both more realistic and more wholesome to me. Can you tell I love this series? I wish I had discovered it when I was a child, but I’m enjoying it immensely now as an adult. If you love historical fiction with a bright and uplifting worldview, you owe it to yourself to read this series. It’s one of easiest classics to read that I’ve yet to come across. For more of my reviews, as well as my own fiction and thoughts on life, check out my blog, Celestial Musings.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Miranda Reads

    Why did Anne have to grow up so fast? The first book was fabulous! Lots of fun mischief but the second has her at 16 already! Where did those four years go? Laura Ingalls Wilder didn't skimp out on the childhood. I enjoyed this book - seeing Anne blossom into a young school teacher (aside: Why did everyone get such great jobs out of high school?? Same with Laura Ingalls Wilder. They just handed out jobs to anyone who would take them!) A pet peeve of mine was really played upon. All kids are prec Why did Anne have to grow up so fast? The first book was fabulous! Lots of fun mischief but the second has her at 16 already! Where did those four years go? Laura Ingalls Wilder didn't skimp out on the childhood. I enjoyed this book - seeing Anne blossom into a young school teacher (aside: Why did everyone get such great jobs out of high school?? Same with Laura Ingalls Wilder. They just handed out jobs to anyone who would take them!) A pet peeve of mine was really played upon. All kids are precocious angels. Yes, Anne has some struggles but you know from the start that she's going to overcome them magnificently. It's a little too predictable. And the precocious moments were bordering annoying. Anyone else feel for poor Dora? Her twin brother, Davy, is a ,b>complete bullying snot yet Anne and Marilla just adore him (they even admit that the care more for that little snit)?! Sure Dora is quiet, but she is dutiful and obedient and deserves twice as much attention as they are lavishing on that horrible Davy. Still loved this book though!! Audiobook Comments Read by Barbara Caruso and she really let this audio shine. Blog | Instagram

  16. 5 out of 5

    Helene Jeppesen

    This sequel was just as good as the first one "Anne of Green Gables". It was nice, comfortable, endearing and at times hilarious. In this book, we get to follow Anne as she grows up to become a woman, and the new set of characters (as well as the well-known ones from the first book) are great. Montgomery has managed to create a world which can only bring a smile to your face, and so I'm obviously excited to get back to it whenever I decide to pick up the third book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    I enjoyed Anne of Avonlea but I did not find it as engaging as Anne of Green Gables. Here's why. Anne of Green Gables gave the reader lots to look forward to. Will Marilla let Anne stay? When will Anne meet Diana? Will she ever forgive Gilbert? While reading Anne of Avonlea, I didn't find myself asking any such questions or looking forward to anything. The book didn't seem to be leading up to anything as far as Anne was concerned. It read more like a series of situations involving Anne while the I enjoyed Anne of Avonlea but I did not find it as engaging as Anne of Green Gables. Here's why. Anne of Green Gables gave the reader lots to look forward to. Will Marilla let Anne stay? When will Anne meet Diana? Will she ever forgive Gilbert? While reading Anne of Avonlea, I didn't find myself asking any such questions or looking forward to anything. The book didn't seem to be leading up to anything as far as Anne was concerned. It read more like a series of situations involving Anne while the actual "story" was happening to another character named Miss Lavender. Marilla adoped twins in this one and Montgomery focused so much on the boy, Davy, that I couldn't help but wonder why she bothered to write in his twin sister Dora at all. Anne of Avonlea basically felt like a "passing of time" for Anne. I kept waiting for something to happen to her but it just didn't. I'd still like to continue with the series to see how things progress. Even though Anne of Avonlea didn't quite meet my expectations I found it a charming read and would recommend it to anyone who enjoyed Anne of Green Gables. It was nice to visit the old beloved characters again.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Norah Una Sumner

    I didn't like this one as much as the first book (there's just not enough Gilbert, am I right?) but I definitely enjoyed continuing this adventure with Anne. There are so many new characters in this one but, unfortunately, I didn't seem to love all of them. The writing stays just as beautiful as it was in the first book. Also, that last paragraph. Be still my beating heart. Can't wait to start Anne of the Island!

  19. 5 out of 5

    WhatIReallyRead

    I've read Anne of Green Gables over 7 years ago and it became a favorite, but I never continued the series. Picking the second book up so many years later, I was a little nervous I might not like it, but I my fears turned out to be groundless. Anne of Avonlea reads like a collection of anecdotes of a village life. It is fluffy and cute, innocent without being preachy and gives one a warm feeling inside. It was also funny - I laughed out loud many times throughout the book. Avonlea is full of good I've read Anne of Green Gables over 7 years ago and it became a favorite, but I never continued the series. Picking the second book up so many years later, I was a little nervous I might not like it, but I my fears turned out to be groundless. Anne of Avonlea reads like a collection of anecdotes of a village life. It is fluffy and cute, innocent without being preachy and gives one a warm feeling inside. It was also funny - I laughed out loud many times throughout the book. Avonlea is full of good people. They help each other. They do the best they can. They fail (mostly in a hilarious way), but still, they try. And this is your ticket to watch them do it. Anne is growing up and faces new questions about the world and about herself. Though she is mostly in the background in this book, serving as an observer who integrates all the short stories about the side-characters. The book was delightful and insubstantial, like a mousse dessert. It is definitely not plot-driven - it passes over you like a collection of clouds and you may make of it what you will. I think I'll continue on reading the series, but probably translated to one of the languages I need improvement in.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Elaina

    One thing I really like about the Anne of Green Gables series is the characters, of course! ^_^ You grow to love all of them, old and new ones alike! :) As for some of the new, I liked Paul Irving, one of Anne’s students at the Avonlea school. He was such a sweet and kind little boy! I also enjoyed Davy’s character. He was one of the twins that Anne and Marilla took in after their mother had died. He was such a trip :P Davy was always getting into trouble or caught eating the jam preserves Maril One thing I really like about the Anne of Green Gables series is the characters, of course! ^_^ You grow to love all of them, old and new ones alike! :) As for some of the new, I liked Paul Irving, one of Anne’s students at the Avonlea school. He was such a sweet and kind little boy! I also enjoyed Davy’s character. He was one of the twins that Anne and Marilla took in after their mother had died. He was such a trip :P Davy was always getting into trouble or caught eating the jam preserves Marilla had made…he just was a fun character to read about and always made me laugh, although he was pretty mischievous too! One other new characters I really liked was Miss Lavender Lewis! We didn’t see her I think until either the middle or close to the end of the book I am pretty sure. It was entertaining when we got to see the conversations she had with Anne when she would visit Miss Lavender :) Of course, I still love all of the old characters from the first book too!! Anne, Gilbert, Diana, Mrs. Lynde, and Marilla are all of my favorites! I was kind of sad that there wasn’t a whole lot of Gilbert in this book :/ There was barely any at all except for random times when a character would mention his name…I don’t remember there being many scenes where he actually talked though :( I did really like the ending and I thought it was sweet ^_^ This wasn’t my favorite out of the two I’ve read, but I still enjoyed it and I thought it got more interesting once you knew all of the characters better like Paul and Davy :) I am sure I will like the next book more though because I think I know what happens in it ;) That’s all I am going to say about that lol

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    "Don't you know that it is only very foolish folk who talk sense all the time?" Another Series of Letters. Manchester, A woman picked a leaf out of my hair on the bus today (true story… it's very windy and I don’t brush my hair there are a lot of trees near me). Also, I’m pretty sure One Direction (and their fan girls) were on the same bus this morning. (Brits… you’ll understand my pain. Everyone else, you don’t want to know...I promise you.) Also, the postman didn’t knock on the door and just "Don't you know that it is only very foolish folk who talk sense all the time?" Another Series of Letters. Manchester, A woman picked a leaf out of my hair on the bus today (true story… it's very windy and I don’t brush my hair there are a lot of trees near me). Also, I’m pretty sure One Direction (and their fan girls) were on the same bus this morning. (Brits… you’ll understand my pain. Everyone else, you don’t want to know...I promise you.) Also, the postman didn’t knock on the door and just shoved one of those ‘SORRY YOU WEREN’T IN’ things through my letter box. That would not be tolerated on Prince Edward Island. You’re making my decision to move all the more easier. Yours faithfully, Miss Williams. Dear L.M, Re: Moving into your mind. Did you get my previous letters? Have you had chance to think about me moving into your mind? Only I have a few friends who would probably be quite interested too. We won’t make much noise, we’ll take off our shoes before entering and we’ll always use a coaster. Please think about it! Kind Regards, J. Williams. Dearest Anne, I fear I must apologise for laughing so heartily at the firecracker incident. I promise I was laughing with you and not at you. I hope my honesty and my apology will still allow me to be your kindred spirit. Lots of love, Jo. P.S. Re: Gilbert. ANNE. You have no idea how much I wanted to strangle you with that descending veil of yours at the end. Dear Gilbert, Sigh. If only you were real your heart didn’t beat in time with another’s. Yours Truly, Jo. Miss L- They say life starts at 40….. And I’m sure the handsome prince will help. ;-) –J.W Paul, Stay away from Davy, I don't want your innocent and sweet mind messed up by him. He is obviously up to no good and only naughty people will be silly enough to play with him. Best wishes, Jo. Davy- Meet me in Dora’s room. I’ve got those toads you asked for- J.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Darcy

    Spoiler alert: I'm going to read all the rest of these and give them all five stars.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    4.5 stars. Review to follow

  24. 4 out of 5

    steph

    I remember reading this book at 12 or 13 and being underwhelmed by it. And then re-reading it two or three years later and just wanting to skip ahead to book #3 because it did not have enough of the romance between Gilbert and Anne that book 3 has. But upon slow re-read now, I realize that this book is fantastic on its own. Anne at ages 16 to 18 is wonderful. She doesn't chatter so much as she did when she was younger but instead her stories are more elegant and lovely and I love how romantic she I remember reading this book at 12 or 13 and being underwhelmed by it. And then re-reading it two or three years later and just wanting to skip ahead to book #3 because it did not have enough of the romance between Gilbert and Anne that book 3 has. But upon slow re-read now, I realize that this book is fantastic on its own. Anne at ages 16 to 18 is wonderful. She doesn't chatter so much as she did when she was younger but instead her stories are more elegant and lovely and I love how romantic she still is but at a different level then her at 11 years old. We get the introduction of Paul Irving, Miss Lavender, Charlotta the Fourth, Davy and Dora and Mr Harrison. We get to read about Uncle Abe and his prophesy, Anthony Pye and Anne's Jonas day and the Avonlea Village Improvement Society (which is NOT for the improvement of people btw). And then the ending, which has one of my favorite paragraphs of all the books. “For a moment Anne's heart fluttered queerly and for the first time her eyes faltered under Gilbert's gaze and a rosy flush stained the paleness of her face. It was as if a veil that had hung before her inner consciousness had been lifted, giving to her view a revelation of unsuspected feelings and realities. Perhaps, after all, romance did not come into one's life with pomp and blare, like a gay knight riding down; perhaps it crept to one's side like an old friend through quiet ways; perhaps it revealed itself in seeming prose, until some sudden shaft of illumination flung athwart its pages betrayed the rhythm and the music, perhaps. . . perhaps. . .love unfolded naturally out of a beautiful friendship, as a golden-hearted rose slipping from its green sheath. ”

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mel

    I just realized I never really did anything with this book, but I decided to dnf it. I listened to about half and realized I had fallen out of love with Anne Shirley. She was such a beautiful creative unique child, but as a grown up she’s lost a lot of her charm and i just wasn’t digging what I had listened to. I will sadly be dnfing the series but the first book will always be dear to me.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chantal

    Non bello quanto il primo a mio parere, ma mi è piaciuto vedere Anna più adulta e tutte le strambe vicende in cui è stata coinvolta. Il finale mi ha fatto scendere la lacrimuccia, sono felice, proprio felice! Devo leggere il terzo che prevedo feels a non finire!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Marie

    This isn't as good as the first, in my opinion. I was hoping for more interaction with Anne and Gilbert. Though they are both members of the Avonlea Village Improvement Society, the two of them actually do not have many scenes together since he teaches at a school that is further away and is only home on weekends (I think?) and during summer break. The addition of the troublemaking orphan Davy to the story nearly ruined this book for me. He has a twin sister named Dora who is a total angel, but A This isn't as good as the first, in my opinion. I was hoping for more interaction with Anne and Gilbert. Though they are both members of the Avonlea Village Improvement Society, the two of them actually do not have many scenes together since he teaches at a school that is further away and is only home on weekends (I think?) and during summer break. The addition of the troublemaking orphan Davy to the story nearly ruined this book for me. He has a twin sister named Dora who is a total angel, but Anne plainly states (and Marilla feels the same way) that she loves Davy more. I didn't find him charming, adorable, funny, precious, etc. I wish I could erase his existence in these pages. I hated how Anne was around him: she would feel guilty for punishing his bad behavior and she would give in whenever he turned on the charm around her. Everything I loved about Anne would disappear when she's around this boy. You can't even argue that Anne prefers him because he was a troublemaker like she was when she was a child, because while Anne did get into crazy predicaments, she always had good intentions behind her actions. Davy does not. He makes mischief because he can, because he's bored. I hated how poor Dora would be ignored, but I guess that's really the author's fault since she didn't think of her as much of a character. I still plan on reading at least the third book in the series, but I really, really hope Davy is nowhere to be found in it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jazzy

    I love how Anne makes all the little routine things in life seem so magical and heartfelt. Inspires me to live a life that’s full of those kinds of thoughts and dreams. Life is so much more beautiful because there are books like these and characters like Anne to help inspire readers. :)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lora

    When I was younger, my mother and I would watch reruns of Dennis the Menace. Truth be told, the only enjoyment I got out of these sessions was spending time with my mother. You see, Dennis was, to me, exactly what the title proclaims him to be: a menace. Since I was very young I've had a strong aversion to any one who causes trouble for others or keeps getting into scrapes, be they intentional or not. As anyone who's read Anne's first installment can imagine, this made it a bit difficult for me t When I was younger, my mother and I would watch reruns of Dennis the Menace. Truth be told, the only enjoyment I got out of these sessions was spending time with my mother. You see, Dennis was, to me, exactly what the title proclaims him to be: a menace. Since I was very young I've had a strong aversion to any one who causes trouble for others or keeps getting into scrapes, be they intentional or not. As anyone who's read Anne's first installment can imagine, this made it a bit difficult for me to take to her character. In Anne of Green Gables, Anne is rather rash and even careless in her decision making. But boy has she grown up now! I didn't think Montgomery would make young Anne grow so fast, rather I thought her character would take several installments just to reach age sixteen. Gladly, this isn't the case. In Anne of Avonlea, Anne starts off at the age of half-past sixteen; and the book ends two years later. I must admit she's won my admiration from here on out. Anne is the sort of girl who makes you think they invented the word "spitfire" as a means to describe her alone, and coupled with her copious amount of enthusiasm and optimism, I dare say it is nearly impossible for one to not fall for her eventually! And in the second part of her story, we see Anne strungle with her new position as schoolma'am at the Avonlea school. To top this off, she must aid Marilla in the caring of two children whom Marilla has chosen to adopt: the naughty but adorable Davy, and the prim and and slightly-dull Dora. Sprinkle on mulitple new acquaintances, several furnerals, two engagements, a wedding . . . and you've got an awfully busy two years for our dear Anne. This series is clearly something I'd have missed out on had Jo not spoken so highly of it through her lovely reviews, so thank you, Jo. I find myself slowly but surely warming to the characters and their world more with each chapter. And of course, as with all classics, the writing is stunning. "A September day on Prince Edward Island hills; a crisp wind blowing up over the sand dunes from the sea; a long red road, winding through fields and woods, now looping itself about a corner of thick-set spruces, now threading a plantation of young maples with great feathery sheets of ferns beneath them, now dipping down into a hollow where a brook flashed out of the woods and into them again, now basking in open sunshine between ribbons of goldenrod and smoke-blue asters; air athrill with the pipings of myriads of crickets, those glad little pensioners of the summer hills; a plump brown pony ambling along the road; two girls behind him, full to the lips with the simple, priceless joy of youth and life." Naturally, this sort of passage always stirs up some envy in my blood; I can't help but wish I could write like that. Although I suppose there is some comfort --- and, for other reasons, sadness --- in knowing that practically no one writes this way anymore. Although I still can't bring myself to give this a higher rating than the one you'll read momentarily, I assure all who read this that I'm enjoying myself very much while following Anne through her journeys in life. I'll be sure to read Anne of the Island soon. 3.5 stars

  30. 4 out of 5

    Susann

    When I began my re-read of this, I thought that I would end up giving it 3 stars. In my memory, the book was a string of episodes with a much too poetically precocious Paul. But Montgomery brings meaning to these episodes and shows how Anne grows and how Avonlea changes during Anne's two years as schoolmarm. Paul is still too much for my tastes and I do wish Montgomery had given Dora *some* personality. I'm sure she wanted to contrast her against Davy, but that doesn't meant that poor Dora has t When I began my re-read of this, I thought that I would end up giving it 3 stars. In my memory, the book was a string of episodes with a much too poetically precocious Paul. But Montgomery brings meaning to these episodes and shows how Anne grows and how Avonlea changes during Anne's two years as schoolmarm. Paul is still too much for my tastes and I do wish Montgomery had given Dora *some* personality. I'm sure she wanted to contrast her against Davy, but that doesn't meant that poor Dora has to be a little Stepford child. I hadn't remembered that Anne wears no colors for the two years after Matthew's death, but that doesn't stop Montgomery from making me envy all those muslin dresses Anne and Diana wear. And how about this simple line that I wish I could incorporate into my conversations: "...there were nights when Anne could not sleep for wondering whether she had done right in advising Miss Lavendar to select brown rather than navy blue for her traveling dress, and to have her gray silk made princess." Best line, though, belongs to Mrs. Lynde who sums up Mrs. Cotton perfectly with, "She washes her dishes sitting down." I won this copy in a summer reading library program. Is now the time to confess that I still want to pronounce it "uh-VON-lee-uh" instead of "A-von-lee?"

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