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Prinz Kaspian von Narnia (The Chronicles of Narnia (Publication Order) #2)

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NARNIA...ist in höchster Gefahr! Seine Tiere und Bäume wurden ausgelöscht, ebenso die Zwerge und Faune. Der grausame Herrscher und Thronräuber Miraz setzt alles daran, die Erinnerung an die alte Welt von Narnia zu verbannen. Mutig stellt sich Prinz Kaspian seinem Onkel entgegen. Er bläst in sein Zauberhorn und erhält so die Hilfe von Peter, Susan, Edmund und Lucy, die nach NARNIA...ist in höchster Gefahr! Seine Tiere und Bäume wurden ausgelöscht, ebenso die Zwerge und Faune. Der grausame Herrscher und Thronräuber Miraz setzt alles daran, die Erinnerung an die alte Welt von Narnia zu verbannen. Mutig stellt sich Prinz Kaspian seinem Onkel entgegen. Er bläst in sein Zauberhorn und erhält so die Hilfe von Peter, Susan, Edmund und Lucy, die nach Narnia zurückkehren. Ein abenteuerlicher Kampf beginnt.


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NARNIA...ist in höchster Gefahr! Seine Tiere und Bäume wurden ausgelöscht, ebenso die Zwerge und Faune. Der grausame Herrscher und Thronräuber Miraz setzt alles daran, die Erinnerung an die alte Welt von Narnia zu verbannen. Mutig stellt sich Prinz Kaspian seinem Onkel entgegen. Er bläst in sein Zauberhorn und erhält so die Hilfe von Peter, Susan, Edmund und Lucy, die nach NARNIA...ist in höchster Gefahr! Seine Tiere und Bäume wurden ausgelöscht, ebenso die Zwerge und Faune. Der grausame Herrscher und Thronräuber Miraz setzt alles daran, die Erinnerung an die alte Welt von Narnia zu verbannen. Mutig stellt sich Prinz Kaspian seinem Onkel entgegen. Er bläst in sein Zauberhorn und erhält so die Hilfe von Peter, Susan, Edmund und Lucy, die nach Narnia zurückkehren. Ein abenteuerlicher Kampf beginnt.

30 review for Prinz Kaspian von Narnia (The Chronicles of Narnia (Publication Order) #2)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    I read this aloud to my older boy, age 6. It's a good book, and he enjoyed it, but didn't ring the bell in the same way Lion, Witch and the Wardrobe did. I think the biggest reason for this, was that it wasn't as accessible to him. The first issue was the non-linear story. Which has the potential to confuse. Later, Lewis splits the party in a way that divides the action in the story. But the biggest issue is that the characters lapse into archaic, courtly English when the a bunch of the people are I read this aloud to my older boy, age 6. It's a good book, and he enjoyed it, but didn't ring the bell in the same way Lion, Witch and the Wardrobe did. I think the biggest reason for this, was that it wasn't as accessible to him. The first issue was the non-linear story. Which has the potential to confuse. Later, Lewis splits the party in a way that divides the action in the story. But the biggest issue is that the characters lapse into archaic, courtly English when the a bunch of the people are talking at the end of the book. (Because the siblings used to be kings and queens, and they're talking with the nobility of the Telemarines.) It's not just unfamiliar language to children. It's unfamiliar and archaic language. (Doubly archaic now, as Lewis wrote these 50 years ago.) My boy couldn't follow it at all, as there were 2-4 unfamiliar terms used in every sentence, and context can only stretch so far.) Because of that, Oot couldn't understand whole sections of the climax of the book, when the Telmarines were talking among themselves, and planning on betraying their king. (A vital plot point he couldn't get because it was only made explicit in this dialogue.) As a result, I had to skim, skip, or summarize big chunks of the book so he could get it. Maybe in a year or two, he would have been fine. (Also, keep in mind that my boy is extremely vocabulary. We've been reading to him since he was six months old. Results with your own child may vary.) Sexism a little more present here, but not oppressive or malicious. Still, you can't deny that the boys go off to duel and do battle stuff, while the girls hang out with Aslan and go wake the trees. This book had better characters that the first book of the series. Nikabrik is a great example of a good guy gone bad. Trumpkin and Trufflehunter are great as well. But Reepicheep is the real star here. Perhaps the best character in all of Narnia, excepting Aslan himself. Lastly, and mostly as a side note, Lewis really knocked it out of the park in terms of names. Nikabrik is a great name for a venomous black dwarf. Glenstorm the proud centaur. Wimbleweather the dim but kind giant. And Reepicheep, of course. I don't know if a name has ever fit a character better than "Reepicheep" does....

  2. 4 out of 5

    Barry Pierce

    Hamlet with badgers.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Miranda Reads

    You doubt your value. Don't run from who you are. The Pevensie siblings (Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy) spent the last year daydreaming about Narnia. Despite the horrors of the White Witch, but they constantly think about returning to Narnia for they are only truly themselves when they are with Aslan. Feeling like the voice she liked best in all the world was calling her name. And when they suddenly find themselves thrust back into Narnia, they discover one very, very important thing: Things You doubt your value. Don't run from who you are. The Pevensie siblings (Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy) spent the last year daydreaming about Narnia. Despite the horrors of the White Witch, but they constantly think about returning to Narnia for they are only truly themselves when they are with Aslan. Feeling like the voice she liked best in all the world was calling her name. And when they suddenly find themselves thrust back into Narnia, they discover one very, very important thing: Things never happen the same way twice. The siblings soon realize that time moves far differently in Narnia than it does in the real world. A thousand years have passed and everyone they once knew have long since passed. It's up to them to put the one, true prince on Narnia's throne and right the world that has gone so far astray. I did appreciate how C. S. Lewis wrote his female characters with a bit of spunk and sass in them: “That's the worst of girls," said Edmund to Peter and the Dwarf. "They never can carry a map in their heads." "That's because our heads have something inside them," said Lucy. Though, I did notice that the gals never got to do any sword-fighting and did spend a lot of time being protected by their brothers. Ah well. It was a sign of the times. And while I really enjoyed catching up with Lucy and co., I was hugely disappointed to learn about the time-jump. I just couldn't believe that C. S. Lewis wrote off the Beaver family and Mr. Tumnus so quickly. We still have Aslan but I missed the side-characters I fell in love with. Audiobook Comments Read by Lynn Redgrave and it was rather well done. Enjoyable to listen to!

  4. 5 out of 5

    P

    “Things never happen the same way twice.” Admittedly Prince Caspian was boring at first for I didn't like the symbolic meaning of the whole book. It was hard to read and that incredible ending nearly shut me out from enjoying, it's abrupt and unsatisfied at all. Although I quie liked the movie, the book is so much different. The pace is excruciatingly slow. I didn't like the over-descriptive narration talking about everything including flowers, sky, and trees. “Wouldn't it be dreadful if some “Things never happen the same way twice.” Admittedly Prince Caspian was boring at first for I didn't like the symbolic meaning of the whole book. It was hard to read and that incredible ending nearly shut me out from enjoying, it's abrupt and unsatisfied at all. Although I quie liked the movie, the book is so much different. The pace is excruciatingly slow. I didn't like the over-descriptive narration talking about everything including flowers, sky, and trees. “Wouldn't it be dreadful if some day in our own world, at home, men start going wild inside, like the animals here, and still look like men, so that you'd never know which were which.” The first part of this book was acceptable, especially when Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy comes back to Narnia, the vibes of the book is nearly the same as the previous one. But around the middle, the story was a downfall, there're so many subtle meanings between the pages, it gave me such a headache that I had to think about it many times. However, this book isn't awful. It has the enjoyable parts to keep my attention until the last page. Prince Caspian is as intriguing as always, so much alike his character in the movie. “Feeling like the voice she liked best in all the world was calling her name.” https://goo.gl/2jOuq2

  5. 5 out of 5

    Whitney Atkinson

    I'm mad at myself because I wanted to read the first of the Narnia series before reading this one for class, but I didn't quite make it. I loved this story because I love Lucy and Aslan and Caspian, but there were a lot of side characters who I didn't care much about and the villain in this book wasn't so interesting. Nevertheless, a muuuuch easier read than Lord of the Rings!!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Prince Caspian: the return to Narnia (Chronicles of Narnia, #2) عنوان: ماجراهای نارنیا - کتاب 2: شاهزاده کاسپین؛ نویسنده: کلاویو استیپلز لوئیس ( 1898 - 1963 ) مترجم: امید اقتداری؛ منوچهر کریم زاده؛ تهران، 1379؛ در 208 ص؛ شابک: 9647100043؛ چاپ سوم 1384؛ هفت جلد در 1368 صفحه؛ موضوع: داستانهای خیال انگیز برای نوجوانان از نویسندگان انگلیسی قرن 20 م مترجم: پیمان اسماعیلیان خامنه؛ تهران، قدیانی، 1386؛ در 284 ص؛ شابک: 9644178521؛ مترجم: مهناز داوودی؛ تهران، پنجره، 1387؛ در 200 ص؛ شابک: 9789648890877؛ خرسه Prince Caspian: the return to Narnia (Chronicles of Narnia, #2) عنوان: ماجراهای نارنیا - کتاب 2: شاهزاده کاسپین؛ نویسنده: کلاویو استیپلز لوئیس ( 1898 - 1963 ) مترجم: امید اقتداری؛ منوچهر کریم زاده؛ تهران، 1379؛ در 208 ص؛ شابک: 9647100043؛ چاپ سوم 1384؛ هفت جلد در 1368 صفحه؛ موضوع: داستانهای خیال انگیز برای نوجوانان از نویسندگان انگلیسی قرن 20 م مترجم: پیمان اسماعیلیان خامنه؛ تهران، قدیانی، 1386؛ در 284 ص؛ شابک: 9644178521؛ مترجم: مهناز داوودی؛ تهران، پنجره، 1387؛ در 200 ص؛ شابک: 9789648890877؛ خرسهای شکم گنده، خیلی مشتاق بودند که، اول ضیافت برگزار شود، و گردهمایی بماند برای بعد. شاید برای فردا. ص 79 س 17 کتاب

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sophia Triad

    One year has passed since Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy went to Narnia through an old Wardrobe and met the bad white witch and the righteous lion. Now they are sitting on a seat at a railway station with trunks and playboxes piled up round them on their way to school. But Narnia needs them back. More precisely PRINCE CASPIAN, the true king of Narnia needs them back. And the children are ready for a new adventure in the land that thousand - years ago they used to be Kings and Queens themselves. One year has passed since Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy went to Narnia through an old Wardrobe and met the bad white witch and the righteous lion. Now they are sitting on a seat at a railway station with trunks and playboxes piled up round them on their way to school. But Narnia needs them back. More precisely PRINCE CASPIAN, the true king of Narnia needs them back. And the children are ready for a new adventure in the land that thousand - years ago they used to be Kings and Queens themselves. Because time passes at different speeds in Narnia. And now the landscape has changed and the men are ruling the fairytale land. The talking animals and the mythical creatures are hiding trying to survive. Everyone remembers Narnia's golden age and everyone is hoping that a just King will appear and will bring prosperity and safety again to the rightful population of Narnia. There two stories in this book that mingle: The story of the prince Caspian and how he claims this throne and the story of the four children’s return to Narnia. It may look confusing when you read it, but everything will make sense after a certain point in the book. Then begin a new paragraph….. Sometimes The Chronicles of Narnia remind me the Neverending Story.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dannii Elle

    This is my fourth journey into the fantastical lands of Narnia, as I have chosen to read the series in chronological rather than publication order. From the very first line I knew I was sure to love this book as it details the return of the Pevensie children from The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, the most famous and my most beloved Narnia tale. Only one year later in the human world, and centuries later in Narnian time, the children return to find their beloved castle an ivy-clad ruin and th This is my fourth journey into the fantastical lands of Narnia, as I have chosen to read the series in chronological rather than publication order. From the very first line I knew I was sure to love this book as it details the return of the Pevensie children from The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, the most famous and my most beloved Narnia tale. Only one year later in the human world, and centuries later in Narnian time, the children return to find their beloved castle an ivy-clad ruin and the land they knew and loved altered beyond all recognition. Another form of evil has taken control of the lands and the children must once again work with the magical Narnian beasts to free it from the tyrant's control. Whilst I adored the actual story, some elements of it did make me wince a little. Referring to some little girls as 'plump' and mentioning their 'fat legs' seemed like an unnecessary addition to the text but I also need to remember that these books weren't penned in this century, where such writing is unacceptable. This entire series touches me on such a deep emotional level, despite the simplicity of the tales. It is such a wonderful feeling to read something that ends with such purity and goodness. I think this is the magic of reading stories aimed at children: in the adult genre this suspended belief would not be tolerated and the 'happily ever afters' would not be believed. We often look for more complex conclusions, but it is so refreshing to read something where good is sure to conquer evil and be content that all that is wrong will be rightfully restored.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Elaina

    Ahhh!! I just love these books so much!! ^_^ They make you feel like you are watching a movie in your head while you are reading every word! (If that makes any sense lol) I love the little bits of humor that C.S. Lewis through in every once and a while like this quote, “That's the worst of girls," said Edmund to Peter and the Dwarf. "They never can carry a map in their heads." "That's because our heads have something inside them," said Lucy.” I don't know why I love that quote so much, but I do :p Ahhh!! I just love these books so much!! ^_^ They make you feel like you are watching a movie in your head while you are reading every word! (If that makes any sense lol) I love the little bits of humor that C.S. Lewis through in every once and a while like this quote, “That's the worst of girls," said Edmund to Peter and the Dwarf. "They never can carry a map in their heads." "That's because our heads have something inside them," said Lucy.” I don't know why I love that quote so much, but I do :p I definitely recommend this series and of course, the movies are amazing as well! :) I really hope that they make a movie for the Silver Chair soon! Now onto the Voyage of the Dawn Treader next! :D

  10. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    November 19, 2008. I've read these books a zillion and one times and surely I shall read them a zillion more. Because every single time, I realize new truths and find more honor in their pages. Today, I've read a passage that I find disturbing and quite out of character for CS Lewis: p.72 "Shall we go farther up for you, up to the crags? There's an Ogre or two and a Hag that we could introduce you to, up there." "Certainly not," said Caspian. "I should think not, indeed," said Trufflehunter. "We November 19, 2008. I've read these books a zillion and one times and surely I shall read them a zillion more. Because every single time, I realize new truths and find more honor in their pages. Today, I've read a passage that I find disturbing and quite out of character for CS Lewis: p.72 "Shall we go farther up for you, up to the crags? There's an Ogre or two and a Hag that we could introduce you to, up there." "Certainly not," said Caspian. "I should think not, indeed," said Trufflehunter. "We want none of that sort on our side." Seems a bit racist, if you ask me. It really makes me wonder exactly what CS Lewis is getting at here. It's totally the opposite of what happens in The Last Battle when Aslan sorts the good guys from the bad guys by whether they're good oir evil in their hearts. So anyway, it seems weird and I don't like it. The Hag does ends up being a bad guy in the end, but still... I dunno. I'll keep reading and blame the racism on the 1950s for now. Oh yeah, as a side note, whenever I read British literature, I talk to myself in a British accent and rhythm for a while afterward. It's so dorky!!! Later... I've read a bit more now. The race issue didn't come up again. The battle scenes are not the same as you might see these days. There's something more frank and quick about them. Lewis doesn't explain every little move and maneuver, so in fact, if you're reading too fast, you might even miss a fight going on. Here's an example of a battle overview without much in the way of specifics: P. 187 But the new bout went well. Peter now seemed to be able to make some use of his shield, and he certainly made good use of his feet. He was almost playing Tig with Miraz now, keeping out of range shifting his ground, making the enemy work. I think if this book had been written today by a different author, it might be about 500 pages of battle scenes. I'm glad its not. Instead, the book is more about people standing on the side of good. Here's a passage that I just love which describes Edmund who may be a boy, but is also a king: P.174An hour later two great lords in the army of Miraz, the Lord Glozelle and the Lord Sopespian, strolling along their lines and picking their teeth after breakfast, looked up and saw coming down to them from the wood the Centaur and Giant Wembleweather, whom they had seen before in battle, and between them a figure they could not recognise. Nor indeed would the other boys at Edmund's school have recognised him if they could have seen him at that moment. For Aslan had breathed on him at their meeting and a kind of greatness hung about him. Ahhhhh... See? For Narnia and the North! Also, you Tolkien fans will recognize the onslaught of trees which comes in at the end of the battle--Two Towers--and the river emerging (with the help of Bacchus and his grapevines) to take out the bridge and thwart the enemy in its path--Fellowship. Who came up with it first, I wonder... :) Later still... As I finish reading this lovely little novel, allow me to drop off to sleep with feet towards the fire and good friends on either side... Thank you, Mr. Lewis. I have had a time.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    I read this several times as a kid. It was never high up in the series for me. I have to admit that the movie Disney made did such a great job with it that I now appreciate this book more. I didn't much care for Prince Caspian until I saw the movie (Yes, maybe it had something to do with the actor). Still, this is part of a great series and I'm glad another generation has the chance to enjoy them. Men from Earth have oppressed Narnia. Of course they have. The children are called back to help put I read this several times as a kid. It was never high up in the series for me. I have to admit that the movie Disney made did such a great job with it that I now appreciate this book more. I didn't much care for Prince Caspian until I saw the movie (Yes, maybe it had something to do with the actor). Still, this is part of a great series and I'm glad another generation has the chance to enjoy them. Men from Earth have oppressed Narnia. Of course they have. The children are called back to help put Prince Caspian back on the thrown. The weird part for me is that C. S. has Peter and Susan too old to come back. They were there for only 2 books and he has ditched them as characters until book 7. Very odd, but it works in the end.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Merphy Napier

    A really strong start but it sort of dropped of half way through and felt like it was dragging (despite being only 200 pages). I'm really excited to read the next one though. I want to get back to Narnia!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Katie Ziegler (Life Between Words)

    I think I may like this story even better than The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe. Is that heresy to say? Nothing can replace that first step through the wardrobe into Narnia...but in terms of plot, I think I like Prince Caspian better.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shannon (leaninglights)

    What can you say. Another fantastic adventure in Narnia! And of course, I cried at the end.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bookwraiths

    Reviewed at Bookwraiths Reviews Prince Caspian is the second book in The Chronicles of Narnia. C.S. Lewis begins this tale by revisiting the Pevensie children, who have survived WW II and are at a train station waiting to head off to boarding school. While discussing their concerns about being separated, they are suddenly pulled into another world, which they do not immediately recognize as Narnia. Indeed, the land has changed to such an extent that it is only after finding several relics from th Reviewed at Bookwraiths Reviews Prince Caspian is the second book in The Chronicles of Narnia. C.S. Lewis begins this tale by revisiting the Pevensie children, who have survived WW II and are at a train station waiting to head off to boarding school. While discussing their concerns about being separated, they are suddenly pulled into another world, which they do not immediately recognize as Narnia. Indeed, the land has changed to such an extent that it is only after finding several relics from the past that they even begin to suspect that they are not only in Narnia but actually camped in the ruins of Cair Paravel: their former capital and home, where they reigned as high kings and queens of Narnia. Quickly, the siblings begin to understand that while only a small amount of time has passed in their world, many centuries have rolled by in their former home, which has resulted in the ruination of the castle and a changing of the very land itself. This new state of affairs is soon confirmed for the Pevensie children by one Trumpkin the dwarf, who they rescue from the Telmarines: the overlords of the new Narnia. What transpires after Trumpkin’s rescue is what I call the flashback story. Through Trumpkin, C.S. Lewis basically tells Peter, Edmund, Susan, and Lucy (and by default the reader/listener) all about the new Narnia and our title character, Prince Caspian. We hear about the invasion of the Telmarines, the fading of the old ways, the disappearance of the talking animals of Narnia, and the slow waning of all things magical in Narnia. But we also are told about the rightful heir of this new Narnia, Prince Caspian, who wishes to restore the land to its Golden Age when Peter, Edmund, Susan and Lucy ruled from Cair Paravel and who is even now in hiding with the Old Narnians, trying desperately to restore overthrow his wicked uncle and bring peace, prosperity, and magic back to the land. Only after hearing all this back story, does C.S. Lewis allow our four children to head out into the world on their grand adventure to aid Prince Caspian and thereby restore Narnia to its former glory. I enjoyed this book via audio book (which is a fairly new “reading” medium for me) and found the experience enjoyable and the actors’ performances well done. Specifically, this audio book did a great job of presenting the ambiance of Narnia’s different locals by description as well as sound effects, which on the whole livened up a fairly straightforward tale. As far as the story itself, I found myself conflicted on it: liking some things about it yet disliking others. LIKES 1) C.S. Lewis did not try to just rewrite The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, but gives the reader a whole new Narnia experience. While the old Narnians - fauns, centaurs, talking animals, nymphs, living trees - are still around, they are now in hiding; driven to the edge of extinction by the Telmarines, who have not only conquered the land but turned it into a near non-magical world. This leads to a darker feeling to the story and allows a reader to see Peter, Edmund, Susan and Lucy both overjoyed at being back in Narnia but aghast at its desecration. 2) Lewis allows the Pevensie children to actually grow up. Peter and Susan are shown as near adults, who are becoming blind to the magic in Narnia, while Edmund and Lucy rise to the forefront as the keepers of that magic. Especially illustrative of the “growth” of the characters were Lucy’s struggle to rediscover Aslan and Edmund’s stance as her steadfast supporter. DISLIKES 1) There just isn’t much suspense in this story. The children show up, rescue Trumpkin, get told all about what is going on then head out to join up with Prince Caspian. The majority of the story Peter, Edmund, Susan and Lucy really do not do anything, and even at the climax of the adventure, they are more bystanders than participants. Honestly, all the suspense and actions, which is described in the story, deal with Caspian and are “told” to us in flashback, not experienced as Caspian is living them. While I understand why C.S. Lewis crafted the story this way (The four children are a reader’s link to Narnia) I believe Caspian’s story itself would have been a more rousing tale. 2) Things just work out too easily, even for what is obviously intended as a children’s story. For instance, Caspian grows up, becomes enamored with stories of ancient Narnia and up pops a half-dwarf tutor, who can provide all the lore Caspian needs. When he seeks refuge, the mysterious and little seen “old” Narnians turn up and take the Telmarine Prince into their hearts almost immediately. Each of these things seemed a bit rushed to me, but then again, it could be yet another draw back of flashback stories. All in all, this was an enjoyable listening experience, and much better than the movie - at least in my opinion.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Book #4 in The Chronicles of Narnia, Prince Caspian reunites readers with Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy who find themselves traveling back to Narnia. But this Narnia is different from the one which they left. In fact, many years have passed and their time in Narnia has become something of a legend that no one quite believes to be true. That also includes the great lion known as Aslan. The quartet soon become entwined with the fate of a young man known as Prince Caspian. Caspian is fleeing from Book #4 in The Chronicles of Narnia, Prince Caspian reunites readers with Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy who find themselves traveling back to Narnia. But this Narnia is different from the one which they left. In fact, many years have passed and their time in Narnia has become something of a legend that no one quite believes to be true. That also includes the great lion known as Aslan. The quartet soon become entwined with the fate of a young man known as Prince Caspian. Caspian is fleeing from his uncle, the king, who wants to kill him. Adventure and magic follow and a lot of new characters snuggle their way into reader's hearts. I must confess that when reading The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe as a child, Lucy was always my favorite. With Prince Caspian, I am adding dear Edmund to the list. But goodness Peter and Susan were so condescending to their sister. I took this as a hint from C.S. Lewis that this will be their last Narnian adventure. This book more than makes up for book 3 (The Horse and his boy)which failed to impress me.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Danny Phanton

    Por Narnia, por el león Me fascinó, mi favorito hasta el momento, me encantaron los nuevos personajes en la historia, la forma en que se fue desarrollando la historia desde qué volvieron a llegar a Narnia los hermanos y sin duda como Lewis tiene esa manera única de narrar sus libros, en forma de que te lo esta contando como si alguien te contará un relato, o esa manera en no ir contando cosas que no servirían a la trama, todo directo y lo que tiene que ser. Hasta ahora es mi favorito de la saga, Por Narnia, por el león Me fascinó, mi favorito hasta el momento, me encantaron los nuevos personajes en la historia, la forma en que se fue desarrollando la historia desde qué volvieron a llegar a Narnia los hermanos y sin duda como Lewis tiene esa manera única de narrar sus libros, en forma de que te lo esta contando como si alguien te contará un relato, o esa manera en no ir contando cosas que no servirían a la trama, todo directo y lo que tiene que ser. Hasta ahora es mi favorito de la saga, me encantó. (view spoiler)[Triste que Susan y Peter ya no tienen que volver (hide spoiler)] pero así es la vida. Ahora a ver la película, a ver que tal la adaptaron.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nenia ✨ Queen of Literary Trash, Protector of Out-of-Print Gems, Khaleesi of Bodice Rippers, Mother of Smut, the Unrepentant, Breaker of Convention ✨ Campbell

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I recently decided to reread the Narnia series, only I decided to go about it in chronological order instead of publication order. What does this change? It means you read THE MAGICIAN'S NEPHEW first, instead of THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE, that there's a book about totally random characters sandwiched in between TLTW (THE HORSE AND HIS BOY) before the series settles back into the usual order. I never really liked PRINCE CASPIAN bef Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I recently decided to reread the Narnia series, only I decided to go about it in chronological order instead of publication order. What does this change? It means you read THE MAGICIAN'S NEPHEW first, instead of THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE, that there's a book about totally random characters sandwiched in between TLTW (THE HORSE AND HIS BOY) before the series settles back into the usual order. I never really liked PRINCE CASPIAN before. I tried reading it as a teenager and ended up not finishing, and in the BBC series based on these books (which I watched many times), parts of the Prince Caspian TV movie were almost unwatchable because the battle scenes were so tedious. I think that's where this book chiefly differs from the other books, which are more adventure-type stories, whereas this is like a child's version of GoT. The Pevensie kids are all waiting at a train station to be sent to boarding school when they find themselves sucked back into Narnia. Or, at least, what they think is Narnia, because it's completely different from the Narnia they knew. As it turns out, several hundred years have gone by since they ended up returning home via the Lantern Wastes, and magic has all but been forgotten. They find out from a dwarf that these invaders called "Telmarines" appeared in Narnia one day and assumed rule, and while the current heir is Prince Caspian, his evil uncle has staged a coup to assume regent, and since his wife is pregnant, plans to kill off Caspian, too. All of the talking animals and magic creatures have been forced into hiding, but they are about to come out and stage a civil war. Caspian, who has Susan's magic horn (you know, the one Aslan gave to her instead of a weapon because he sucks), brought her, Peter, Lucy, and Edmund here just in time for the final battle, which ends up being weirdly anticlimactic. Then things get weirder. I didn't really liked the characters in this book that much. It was like all the development they underwent in TLTW had flown out the window. Susan, in particular, is portrayed as a raging you-know-what, whereas Peter is even more condescending, and Lucy even more sulky when she doesn't get her way. Edmund was actually decent here, and I think it's probably because his actions in TLTW ironically made him a much better person, because he's still haunted by his bad choices. Prince Caspian wasn't much better. He was very immature. I liked him much better in the TV movie. Also, does anyone else think it's weird/unfair that at this point, Susan and Peter are told that they can never come back to Narnia because they're too old? What does that mean? The Telmarines were all much older when they came to Narnia, so presumably age is not an issue. Peter drops it so casually, too, and doesn't go into detail or seem much bothered about it at all, when you would think that such a reveal would be utterly devastating. After all, if you consider the end of TLTW canon, Peter actually spent decades living in Narnia, becoming an adult before reverting back to a boy (what), so he really did spend half his life here essentially, only to be kicked out by a holier-than-thou lion. Additionally, I'm super curious about how time works in this series. THE MAGICIAN'S NEPHEW treats us to the genesis of Narnia, and that was about one hundred years before this book (set in Victorian times), and given how time works in Narnia, we can probably assume that was millions of years ago in Narnia times. I think in this book, about a year has passed in between TLTW and PRINCE CASPIAN, which equates to a couple hundred years in Narnia. But then, when the kids find out about the horn, they ask what time it was blown, and the dwarf tells them "Oh, around 9am." And someone - I forget who - says, "Oh, that's the time we were sitting at the train station!" I found that really jarring, because it's been made pretty clear up to that point that time in Narnia doesn't correspond to our world much at all (hence the reason her siblings first thought she was lying when she thought she'd been in Narnia for hours and only a few seconds had gone by). That seems like a pretty egregious mistake. I'm surprised C.S. Lewis's publisher didn't catch that, the first time around. 3 to 3.5 stars

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nikoleta

    Υπέροχο, ένα από τα καλύτερα παραμυθικά φαντασυ βιβλία που έχω διαβάσει!!! Ζώα που μιλούν, δρυάδες, νάνοι, φαυνοι... όλοι οι μαγικοί κόσμοι, τα μαγικά όντα και οι παλιοί μύθοι παρελαύνουν αρμονικά στον τόπο που τον λένε Νάρνια! Είναι σκέτο ξεμυάλισμα αυτή η σειρά!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Markus

    It's been years since I allowed myself the pleasure of rereading the Narnia books. And now I have two pleasures in reading these books: enjoying my old childhood joy, and analyzing the writing itself. One thing I remember noticing even as a child is the absolute dearth of femaleness. I don't mean female characters per se: in terms of having someone to care about and directly identify with, there's always a female child as well as a male one. (Everyone loves Lucy.) I mean that Lewis seems not to h It's been years since I allowed myself the pleasure of rereading the Narnia books. And now I have two pleasures in reading these books: enjoying my old childhood joy, and analyzing the writing itself. One thing I remember noticing even as a child is the absolute dearth of femaleness. I don't mean female characters per se: in terms of having someone to care about and directly identify with, there's always a female child as well as a male one. (Everyone loves Lucy.) I mean that Lewis seems not to have understood that where there are sons, there must be mothers. (Belated warning: There will be spoilers. These books are over 60 years old, and there have been movies made of some of them. If you're over the age of 18 and you haven't read the Narnia books yet, clearly you have no plans to. Which I think is a shame, but hey, you're the boss of you.) Getting back to what I was saying about motherless sons: I'm speaking in a strictly biological sense, and boy howdy does Lewis seem to be squeamish about the strictly biological. When young prince Caspian is forced to flee into the wilderness, he befriends and allies himself with the talking beasts and magical creatures who have gone into hiding since the invasion of the Telmarines. (Excellent name, btw. Lewis is as gifted at naming as Dickens was.) In the course of this delightful search for what's left of the magical beings of Narnia, who does Caspian meet? There are dwarves and dwarf-folk -- descendants of dwarves who are part-human. All of these are male. It feels as if dwarves would have to marry humans in order to carry on the race, since we never, ever, ever hear anything about female dwarves. Probably because in Lewis' world, women are beautiful and good, or beautiful and evil, or ugly and evil; but they're never ugly (or even just ordinary-looking) and good. And the fact is, female dwarves wouldn't be gorgeous to human eyes. Lewis seems uncomfortable with this. (To be fair, so was his good friend, Tolkien. Terry Pratchett seems to be the first major writer to tackle the issue of female dwarves, and he does so delightfully in the Discworld novels.) So: lots of dwarves. All male. Who else? Three talking bears, all male. A giant squirrel, male. Glenstorm the centaur and his three sons. Um, male. Probably because centaurs are always portrayed as bare-chested rather than clothed, and Lewis goes along with that. Having a female centaur would mean having a topless woman or introducing the idea of centaur fashion, and Lewis seems uncomfortable with that. So we have a centaur with three male children and a wife who either died or keeps herself decently tucked away, which seems distinctly un-centaurlike. But okay. (The centaurs even offer refreshments to Caspian and his friends: oatcakes, and wine, and cheese. Boy-centaurs who cook are more okay to Lewis than female centaurs who do anything. Not that I'm bitter.) Who else? Twelve talking, fighting mice. All male. Several other talking animals, all male. (Unless Hogglestock the Hedgehog is female, which I sort of doubt, but I guess it's possible.) Fauns -- male. And a giant. Male. As I said, I remember wondering even as a child where the mothers and daughters and wives were. You kind of can't carry a species on without them. But Lewis is determined to manage somehow. You'd never know from reading this review so far that I love these books. I do. They're humorous and moving and just plain terrific stories. So many lines of dialogue have stuck with me over the years. I love it when Trumpkin the dwarf finds the Pevensie children and is awkwardly explaining that, well, he and his band of rebels had been hoping for some serious military help against the evil King Miraz when they decided to call back the four ancient rulers of Narnia: "I suppose you are the four children out of the old stories," said Trumpkin. "And I'm very glad to meet you of course. And it's very interesting, no doubt. But -- no offence?" -- and he hesitated again. "Do get on and say whatever you're going to say," said Edmund. "Well then (no offence)," said Trumpkin. "But, you know, the King and Trufflehunter and Master Cornelius were expecting -- well, if you see what I mean, help. To put it in another way, I think they'd be imagining you as great warriors. As it is -- we're awfully fond of children and all that, but just at the moment, in the middle of a war -- but I'm sure you understand." The contest that follows, in which the children courteously invite the dwarf to compete with them in fencing and archery (and absolutely trounce him) is as delightful to read now as it was when I was a kid. It's such a joy to have a book in which children are active, competent, skillful characters. I think that's why these books continue to be read and enjoyed. Plenty has changed technologically in the years since they were written, but kids still love having the chance to be heroes. And the Pevensies are ordinary kids who get to do amazing things. Now: another thing I noticed this time around that I also puzzled over as a child was how odd some of Aslan's behavior is. Unless you specifically know that his rules and actions are a metaphor for Christianity, his choices are baffling. Why when he came to lead the children to the right path to reach Caspian did he put Lucy to the test that way? He tormented all of them with his elusiveness, and for what? Plot-wise, it makes no sense. If you know that it's "really" about having Christian faith, it clicks. Especially if you understand that some believers (certainly Lewis was one of them) are firmly convinced that people who say they don't believe in the Christian God secretly do, in their deepest heart of hearts. Here's Susan, talking to Lucy about Aslan: "I really believed it was him -- he, I mean -- yesterday. When he warned us not to go down to the fir-wood. And I really believed it was him tonight, when you woke us up. I mean, deep down inside. Or I could have, if I'd let myself. But I just wanted to get out of the woods and -- and -- oh, I don't know." I don't know either. I'm too straightforward to be able to make much sense of that sort of thing. Again, these stories are strong enough to stand up to their own weaknesses. I loved them then and I love them now. But it's fun to take a keener look at them now that I'm a so-called grownup.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Urmi ✨ BookishPixieOfForbiddenForest✨

    Things never happen the same way twice” I always love the Narnian adventures(though I find the books a bit too kiddy!) So, this was indeed a fantastic adventure but I liked the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe more (which really took my breath away *Aslan...my...Love*). This book will definitely appeal to the middle grade students who want a bit of a what-to-say, Fantasy touch in their pretty little lives. So, in this book, the Pevensie siblings are back to help a prince denied of his rightful th Things never happen the same way twice” I always love the Narnian adventures(though I find the books a bit too kiddy!) So, this was indeed a fantastic adventure but I liked the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe more (which really took my breath away *Aslan...my...Love*). This book will definitely appeal to the middle grade students who want a bit of a what-to-say, Fantasy touch in their pretty little lives. So, in this book, the Pevensie siblings are back to help a prince denied of his rightful throne as he gathers an army in a desperate attempt to rid his land of a false king. But in the end, it is a battle of honor between two men alone that will decide the fate of an entire world. But I don't actually know why I feel like this book had something missing...like something very crucial(that's why 4/5 stars)... But I love all the characters and the world building and the settings and dot-dot-dot...And Narnia's always gonna be my all-time favorite dream destination right after Hogwarts... Looking forward to reading the other books in the series!!! “Aslan: You doubt your value. Don't run from who you are”

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amin

    " هیچ چیز دوبار یک جور رخ نمی دهد " فانتزی های دلنشین فانتزی هایی هستند که وقتی سرت رو از رو کتاب بر میداری تا به کارهای دیگه ات برسی ، همچنان ماجرا هاش رو توی ذهنت حلاجی می کنی، بهش فکر میکنی و حتی خوابش رو میبینی. داستان هایی که از دنیای نه چندان جذاب اطرافت جدات می کنه. نارنیا همین کار رو میکنه. شاید فکر کنید دوباره ماجرای به دردسر افتادن نارنیا و کمک پسران آدم و دختران حوا و اصلان برای نجات اونه ولی همون طور که اصلان می گه : هیچ چیز دوبار یکجور رخ نمیده. با شخصیت های دوست داشتنی تری رو به رو م " هیچ چیز دوبار یک جور رخ نمی دهد " فانتزی های دلنشین فانتزی هایی هستند که وقتی سرت رو از رو کتاب بر میداری تا به کارهای دیگه ات برسی ، همچنان ماجرا هاش رو توی ذهنت حلاجی می کنی، بهش فکر میکنی و حتی خوابش رو میبینی. داستان هایی که از دنیای نه چندان جذاب اطرافت جدات می کنه. نارنیا همین کار رو میکنه. شاید فکر کنید دوباره ماجرای به دردسر افتادن نارنیا و کمک پسران آدم و دختران حوا و اصلان برای نجات اونه ولی همون طور که اصلان می گه : هیچ چیز دوبار یکجور رخ نمیده. با شخصیت های دوست داشتنی تری رو به رو میشیم. که با بعضی هاشون در ادامه مجموعه همراهیم. ریپی جیپ قهرمان، کاسپین و ترامپکین و و و . گره های داستان و روندش به نظر من از کتاب اول بهتر و جذاب تره. لحظات هیجان انگیز داستان که نفس رو بند میاره خیلی خوب در اومده ( لحظه ای که پیتر و ادموند و ترامپکین پشت در اتاق مرکزی جایگاه اصلان گوش واستادن یا نبرد پیتر با میراز ) . بخش غم انگیز ماجرا باز هم پایان ماجرا بود. جایی که با پیتر و سوزان برای همیشه خداحافظی می کنیم ( نمیخوام اسپویل بشه . ولی شاید هم آخرین بار نباشه ;) ). ولی من همچنان به آینده ای فکر می کنم که برای سوزان رخ میده و همچنان حسرت میخورم و با خودم میگم چطور ؟ چطور ؟ چطور؟ ... " به نظر تو این وحشتناک نیست که روزگاری در جهان خود ما آدمها مثل جانوران اینجا از درون وحشی شوند،در حالی که قیافه شان همچنان مثل آدم ها باشد و نشود فهمید کی به کی است ؟ "

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Daviau

    I’m really glad I’m reading these in publication order and not chronological order this time. I’m finding it’s making a difference in the way the series flows and I’m enjoying it more this way so far. But no matter what order I read these books in, I love them just the same! This book introduces one of my favourite characters of the series Reepicheep, I just love how brave he is despite his size!

  24. 5 out of 5

    midnightfaerie

    Note: Just finished reading this one with my 5 yr old, and we loved it! I'm enjoying it much better this time around. Maybe because I didn't understand all the implications the first time, or maybe because I'm seeing it through the eyes of my child. Either way, I love C.S. Lewis more each time I read him! And I've decided not to tell my son about the analogy to Christianity. I want him to figure it out for himself. But just the other day he compared God to Aslan and Spiderman all in the same sen Note: Just finished reading this one with my 5 yr old, and we loved it! I'm enjoying it much better this time around. Maybe because I didn't understand all the implications the first time, or maybe because I'm seeing it through the eyes of my child. Either way, I love C.S. Lewis more each time I read him! And I've decided not to tell my son about the analogy to Christianity. I want him to figure it out for himself. But just the other day he compared God to Aslan and Spiderman all in the same sentence! This is the review I wrote for the overall series: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by CS Lewis is one of the books in his series, the Chronicles of Narnia in which Christianity is portrayed through various fantasy creatures. God, for instance is portrayed as a talking Lion. What a wonderful series! What child hasn’t climbed into a closet and explored the back cracks in hope of finding an entrance to a new and exciting world after reading this book? I used to sit in a closet with the door closed and a flashlight reading my favorite books after reading this series, in hopes that someday a door would open and take me to another realm. Of course, the white witch is my favorite character. I’m always attracted to the bad ones. The Lion, Aslan, is a wonderful character as well, but I have to admit, knowing that he was an analogy for God, changed my view of the story a bit and left me a bit disappointed. He was a bit cheesy. Or maybe typical is a better word. Which is why I almost wish I wouldn’t have known the true meaning of the books until after I read them. In any case, the stories were great, the first one being the best. (You always lose a little of the naiveté of the children as they get older) But the movies did them justice as well. Reading them again as an adult, found me a little bored, but still enchanted overall with the series. The next movie is due out soon and I can only hope they will continue to make the movies which were incredible. I highly recommend this series and consider it a classic as well. ClassicsDefined.com

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Baker

    It's been a while since I've picked up a Narnia book and I forgot how much I love them. I started reading them in chronological order, but then realized it was a mistake, so now I'm reading them in publication order. I love Peter, Edmund, Susan and Lucy, and I'd follow them anywhere. The characters are so life-like! This series is just an enjoyable adventure all around.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Carmen de la Rosa

    Disfrute este libro tanto como los dos libros anteriores, era una historia hermosa. El mundo de Narnia es emocionante como siempre. Los personajes cobran vida antes que lo imagines y te sientes instantáneamente sumergido en él. Aunque realmente los libros de narnia tienen algunos elementos que me hacen estremecer un poco. Referir a algunas niñas como 'infantiles' y mencionar sus 'piernas gordas' parece un elemento innecesario al texto, pero también necesito recordar que estos libros no fueron esc Disfrute este libro tanto como los dos libros anteriores, era una historia hermosa. El mundo de Narnia es emocionante como siempre. Los personajes cobran vida antes que lo imagines y te sientes instantáneamente sumergido en él. Aunque realmente los libros de narnia tienen algunos elementos que me hacen estremecer un poco. Referir a algunas niñas como 'infantiles' y mencionar sus 'piernas gordas' parece un elemento innecesario al texto, pero también necesito recordar que estos libros no fueron escritos en este siglo, donde tal escritura es inaceptable. Una vez más, estas historias son lo suficientemente fuertes como para hacer frente a sus propias debilidades. Toda esta serie me conmueve en un nivel emocional tan profundo, a pesar de la simplicidad de los cuentos. Es una sensación maravillosa, leer algo que termina con tanta pureza y bondad. Son graciosas y conmovedoras y simplemente historias increíbles. Creo que esta es la magia de leer historias dirigidas a niños: en el género adulto, esta creencia terminada, no sería tolerada y no se creería "felices por siempre". A menudo buscamos conclusiones más complejas, pero es tan refrescante leer algo donde el bien está seguro de vencer al mal y estar contento de que todo lo que está mal será restaurado con razón.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Franco Santos

    Cada vez que tengo que escribir o pensar sobre Las Crónicas de Narnia, una oleada de sentimientos y recuerdos se apoderan de mi ser. Una de las palabras que usaría para describir mi infancia sería: Narnia. Este tomo me pareció inferior a sus predecesores, no obstante, me gustó. Sinceramente no recuerdo mucho, tengo que releer la saga, pero sí me acuerdo de que El Príncipe Caspian se me hizo un poco pesado en algunas partes. El inicio me encantó, sin embargo la trama se iba diluyendo a medida que Cada vez que tengo que escribir o pensar sobre Las Crónicas de Narnia, una oleada de sentimientos y recuerdos se apoderan de mi ser. Una de las palabras que usaría para describir mi infancia sería: Narnia. Este tomo me pareció inferior a sus predecesores, no obstante, me gustó. Sinceramente no recuerdo mucho, tengo que releer la saga, pero sí me acuerdo de que El Príncipe Caspian se me hizo un poco pesado en algunas partes. El inicio me encantó, sin embargo la trama se iba diluyendo a medida que avanzaba.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Steven Wedgeworth

    Some of the best theological nuggets appear in this one. Reepicheep is at his most inspirational as well. And don't miss the fact that it is the bad dwarf who doesn't smoke!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Michael Jones

    I just wanted to call attention to what a profound lesson it is when Lucy hears and sees Aslan and the others don't. The response of the others very much parallels the way people respond sometimes when you KNOW you are following the Lord to undertake a certain endeavor. Some, like Susan will tell you you're always dreaming and go back to bed. Some, like Edmund will point out that you've been right before and stick up for you even though he can't quite see what you are suggesting. Some, like Peter w I just wanted to call attention to what a profound lesson it is when Lucy hears and sees Aslan and the others don't. The response of the others very much parallels the way people respond sometimes when you KNOW you are following the Lord to undertake a certain endeavor. Some, like Susan will tell you you're always dreaming and go back to bed. Some, like Edmund will point out that you've been right before and stick up for you even though he can't quite see what you are suggesting. Some, like Peter will admit that you are probably right but then let the pragmatic, circumstantial side of things dictate and kill your trust in God. Some, like Trumpkin the dwarf are completely blind and so have no idea what you're talking about. But the blessed thing is that when you follow Aslan anyway, often the others around you end up being willing to try what you are saying. There is a good page here if you happen to live in a family that doesn't go to church. Just begin going yourself. Who knows, the others may follow! Also, these chapters are precious encouragement if you feel like you haven't really connected with Jesus lately.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah Rodda

    Such a joy to read this to my children.

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