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Super-Homem: Herança Vermelha (Superman Red Son Complete)

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O Sonho Americano é substituido pelo Pesadelo Americano nesta história dum mundo alternativo em que o Super-Homem bebé, depois de escapar à destruição do planeta Krypton, aterra na União Soviética. Nesta história alternativa do universo DC o Super-Homem é o campeão do proletariado, e Lex Luthor o agente que procura continuamente defender os EUA do Comunismo, até à surpreen O Sonho Americano é substituido pelo Pesadelo Americano nesta história dum mundo alternativo em que o Super-Homem bebé, depois de escapar à destruição do planeta Krypton, aterra na União Soviética. Nesta história alternativa do universo DC o Super-Homem é o campeão do proletariado, e Lex Luthor o agente que procura continuamente defender os EUA do Comunismo, até à surpreendente conclusão desta saga. Mark Millar é um dos maiores argumentistas dos comics, e criou aqui uma das mais populares histórias de sempre da linha Elseworlds, acompanhado pelo traço dos artistas Dave Johnson e Kilian Plunkett.


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O Sonho Americano é substituido pelo Pesadelo Americano nesta história dum mundo alternativo em que o Super-Homem bebé, depois de escapar à destruição do planeta Krypton, aterra na União Soviética. Nesta história alternativa do universo DC o Super-Homem é o campeão do proletariado, e Lex Luthor o agente que procura continuamente defender os EUA do Comunismo, até à surpreen O Sonho Americano é substituido pelo Pesadelo Americano nesta história dum mundo alternativo em que o Super-Homem bebé, depois de escapar à destruição do planeta Krypton, aterra na União Soviética. Nesta história alternativa do universo DC o Super-Homem é o campeão do proletariado, e Lex Luthor o agente que procura continuamente defender os EUA do Comunismo, até à surpreendente conclusão desta saga. Mark Millar é um dos maiores argumentistas dos comics, e criou aqui uma das mais populares histórias de sempre da linha Elseworlds, acompanhado pelo traço dos artistas Dave Johnson e Kilian Plunkett.

30 review for Super-Homem: Herança Vermelha (Superman Red Son Complete)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    Honestly? The best Superhero comic I've read in years. I might say "The best Superhero comic I've ever read" if not for The Dark Knight and Watchmen. Very clever. Tightly written. Different enough to be interesting, but still true to the original source mythology of Superman. Highly recommended. Even if you don't really give a damn about superheroes.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    Nature or Nurture? Is Superman’s moral code hot-wired in his DNA or did being raised by the do-right Kents help establish his role as the world’s ultimate Boy Scout? What better way to examine this question than for Mark Millar to have Superman’s rocket ship land in a collective farm in Soviet Russia rather than in the American heartland. When Superman’s powers are realized by the Soviet government, Stalin elevates him to become champion of the common worker and a handy tool in the Cold War agains Nature or Nurture? Is Superman’s moral code hot-wired in his DNA or did being raised by the do-right Kents help establish his role as the world’s ultimate Boy Scout? What better way to examine this question than for Mark Millar to have Superman’s rocket ship land in a collective farm in Soviet Russia rather than in the American heartland. When Superman’s powers are realized by the Soviet government, Stalin elevates him to become champion of the common worker and a handy tool in the Cold War against the U.S. Despite the fact that Superman was raised in Soviet Russia, his humanity is still evident. When Stalin dies and he’s promoted to leader of the country, he does what he can to make Russia the “perfect” place. No bread lines, no tragedy, no dissent. So in the U.S.A., who’s the bulwark against the expected invasion of the godless, commie hordes Superman? Why it’s, um, Lex Luthor, husband of Lois Lane. Millar does some clever things turning the familiar DC universe on its ear with alternate looks at Wonder Woman, Oliver Queen and the Green Lanterns; however, it’s his take on Batman that really deserves kudos. Batman’s parents are gunned down in front of him by the KGB and he becomes an anarchist, bent on overthrowing the Soviet government. The sign of the Bat becomes the subversive rallying cry for change. Recommended as an alternative to those same-old, same-old Superman comics. Grant Morrison has taken credit for suggesting the twisty, tricksy ironic ending to Millar. You’ve been warned.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jan Philipzig

    Coulda Been a Contender... What if Superman had crash-landed and grown up in the Soviet Union rather than in the United States? What if he was… oh my God, dare I spell it out… a “commie”?! What would he be like? Would we still cheer him on? How would the Cold War have turned out? The premise behind Superman: Red Son is as obvious as it is intriguing: in the tradition of Watchmen, it allows – theoretically, at least – for an investigation of the genre’s underlying ideological and political assumpt Coulda Been a Contender... What if Superman had crash-landed and grown up in the Soviet Union rather than in the United States? What if he was… oh my God, dare I spell it out… a “commie”?! What would he be like? Would we still cheer him on? How would the Cold War have turned out? The premise behind Superman: Red Son is as obvious as it is intriguing: in the tradition of Watchmen, it allows – theoretically, at least – for an investigation of the genre’s underlying ideological and political assumptions. As it turns out, however, Millar is not all that interested in politics and ideologies - or even in his own characters, for that matter. What he is really looking for is something much more basic: an excuse to mess with DC continuity. We are introduced to alternate versions of various DC characters and historical figures, but their redefined life courses are hardly explained and certainly do not evolve organically out of the story’s premise. Why is Lois Lane married to Lex Luthor? Why is Jimmy Olsen a CIA agent? Does Wonder Woman even have a personality? Why has Nixon been assassinated instead of Kennedy? There’s no depth, no psychology, no political insight, no sense of time and place. Who cares, Millar seems to think - it’s provocative, that’s all that matters. As the revisionary text it purports to be, however, Superman: Red Son feels half-baked, rushed, and a little silly – as if Millar had spontaneously cooked up the whole thing while playing with his battered action figures, desperate for a new plot twist. Too bad, coulda been a contender...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    Could you imagine if Superman landed in Canada instead of the United States? What if Joe Shuster tried to persuade Jerry Siegel that Clark Kent should grow up on a farm in Alberta or the snowy terrain of northern Manitoba? Or God help us, Newfoundland? What kind of a hero would he be then? Far too polite to get physical. “It’s a bird! It’s a plane! Nah, that’s just Superman, eh.” Fortunately for us, the readers, Mark Millar gives us a more interesting scenario. What if Superman landed in Ukraine a Could you imagine if Superman landed in Canada instead of the United States? What if Joe Shuster tried to persuade Jerry Siegel that Clark Kent should grow up on a farm in Alberta or the snowy terrain of northern Manitoba? Or God help us, Newfoundland? What kind of a hero would he be then? Far too polite to get physical. “It’s a bird! It’s a plane! Nah, that’s just Superman, eh.” Fortunately for us, the readers, Mark Millar gives us a more interesting scenario. What if Superman landed in Ukraine and became a part of the USSR at the height of the Cold War? Becoming the right hand man and the eventual successor to Joseph Stalin, Superman puts the power in the palm of Communist Russia. Unfortunately for the United States, the dramatic shift in power creates chaos at home. While they still have the brilliant scientist Lex Luthor to claim as their own, he becomes obsessed with figuring out how to defeat Superman rather than using his intellect to advance his own society. What develops over the years is very interesting and Mark Millar guides us through an alternate timeline in world history. Just what would happen if “President Superman” ruled over Russia? Would he retain his values or would absolute power corrupt absolutely? The answers may surprise you. This experiment had a multitude of ways it could fall flat on its face and only a select few that would cause it to succeed. Fortunately for DC, Millar knew the right road to take. While this is the only core Superman series I’ve yet read, I have a hard time believing it can be topped (at least in my opinion). I knew enough about the character and the DC universe to keep my head above water, so you don’t need to be a comics historian to catch the jokes and changes in certain superheroes and supervillains. The only real problem I have is the ending. I don’t think it really needed to go quite as far as it did. It was interesting to see where everything ended up after the core conflict was settled but it seemed to go on and on and on. In the end, it’s merely a small complaint - I loved the hell out of this book. Cross Posted @ Every Read Thing

  5. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    It's a bird...it's a plane...It's Commie Superman! It was alright, but I'm not as in love with Red Son as everyone else seems to be. Intellectually, this is a good Superman What If story. *sigh* But it bored me. Sorry, but I had a hard time not putting this down. I can't give it less than 3 stars, because it really is an ingenious take on Superman. I can't give it more, because I had to put it on the back of my toilet to ensure I would finish it. Recommended for Superman fans looking for a What If co It's a bird...it's a plane...It's Commie Superman! It was alright, but I'm not as in love with Red Son as everyone else seems to be. Intellectually, this is a good Superman What If story. *sigh* But it bored me. Sorry, but I had a hard time not putting this down. I can't give it less than 3 stars, because it really is an ingenious take on Superman. I can't give it more, because I had to put it on the back of my toilet to ensure I would finish it. Recommended for Superman fans looking for a What If comic.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lono

    Mark Millar’s got the alternate reality/universe/elseworlds thing down. Between Superman: Red Son, Ultimate X-Men, and Old Man Logan, he has penned some bomb-ass shit. He’s got some haters out there. He certainly isn’t the most sensitive dude. But boy can he write some fun stuff. Anybody that can get me to sit through a Superman book has some talent. Sorry, not a lot of love for the boy in blue. Well in Red Son he’s actually the boy in grey. In this twist of fate story, Kal El crashes in Russia i Mark Millar’s got the alternate reality/universe/elseworlds thing down. Between Superman: Red Son, Ultimate X-Men, and Old Man Logan, he has penned some bomb-ass shit. He’s got some haters out there. He certainly isn’t the most sensitive dude. But boy can he write some fun stuff. Anybody that can get me to sit through a Superman book has some talent. Sorry, not a lot of love for the boy in blue. Well in Red Son he’s actually the boy in grey. In this twist of fate story, Kal El crashes in Russia instead of Kansas and is raised under Stalin’s communist regime. Cool idea. Some similarities remain. He grows up in a farming community, he initially is just interested in helping his people, and he ultimately falls into the service of his nation’s government. I read some complaints that Supes was not different or “evil” enough. I like that Millar just doesn’t do the communist = bad thing here. Superman is still basically a good guy that wants to do the right thing. Making him evil or “bad” might sorta imply that all people in Russia were malevolent Stalinists. And I’m pretty sure that was not the case. He does evolve in this universe a little differently than he did in traditional DC continuity. So does Lex. One thing remains the same though. Even though Luthor can balance the budget and cure cancer, he still hasn’t been able to improve on hair club for men. You’d think he would put 5 or 10 fuckin' minutes into that one, right?!? A ton of cool references in this one and a bunch of familiar faces show up including Lois, Perry, Jimmy, and of course, Lex. There are some familiar, yet different, versions of Batman, Wonder Woman, and a couple of other surprise Leaguers that also make appearances. I really dug this “Anarchy in black” version of the caped crusader. Even the hat. Princess Diana was initially a little bit too much of a lovesick school girl for me, but managed to come around by the end. Overall I really enjoyed Millar’s take on these classic heroes. Dave Johnson does a terrific job on the artwork with this book. Known mostly for his covers (100 Bullets, The Punisher, and some Batman stuff), I really enjoyed seeing him put in some work on this book. His style has always appealed to me and I wish he would do more interior stuff. Sorta reminded me a little of Eduardo Risso. Anyone that enjoys alternate reality or “Elseworlds” stories like Injustice: Gods Among Us, The Dark Knight Returns, Old Man Logan, or Kingdom Come would probably get a kick outta this one. If you’re a Millar fan and you haven't read this, your missing out. Get this review and more at:

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    What if Superman had landed in Soviet Russia instead of Smallville, Kansas? DC's "Elseworlds" series imagines an alternate take on the Superman story with "Comrade Superman" becoming ruler of Soviet Russia, slowly taking over the world while an independent America led by Lex Luthor fights against an increasingly unhinged and totalitarian-minded Man of Steel. Mark Millar has written no less than a masterpiece with "Superman: Red Son". We see the character of Superman evolve from an idealistic youn What if Superman had landed in Soviet Russia instead of Smallville, Kansas? DC's "Elseworlds" series imagines an alternate take on the Superman story with "Comrade Superman" becoming ruler of Soviet Russia, slowly taking over the world while an independent America led by Lex Luthor fights against an increasingly unhinged and totalitarian-minded Man of Steel. Mark Millar has written no less than a masterpiece with "Superman: Red Son". We see the character of Superman evolve from an idealistic young man to new ruler to an increasingly isolated and intolerable megalomaniac who takes his god-like powers and status and tries to make the world into a utopia. Red Superman is at turns heroic and then more dark until he's a terrifying figure of absolute power taken to the limit. Lex is the real star of the book and Millar does a fine job of making him at turns arrogant and ruthless but also charming and funny and with his tireless and imaginative efforts at bringing down the Superman, nothing less than a superhero in his own right. I like when writers add nuance to Luthor's character instead of single-minded cartoonist villainy and Millar hits the right chord with his characterisation of Luthor here. There are great moments throughout the book that make it a non-stop thriller for any comics fan: the re-imaginings of Wonder Woman, Bizarro, and Green Lantern are excellent but the Russian Batman takes the cake for best alternate take on a legend. Red Batman is an urban terrorist living in the sewers, going to extremes to destroy the invincible Superman and in one momentous scene reminiscent of Frank Miller's "The Dark Knight Returns", he almost does it before doing something extreme even Miller's Batman didn't. "Red Son" is easily one of the best Superman books out there and might be the best thing Mark Millar's ever written. He's on top form throughout, his imagination fizzing off of the page from one breath-taking set-piece to the next, aided by amazing art from Dave Johnson and Kilian Plunkett throughout, crescendoing in a completely unpredictable and inspired conclusion. This is a must-read for all superhero fans but it's also an excellent piece of dystopian fiction for readers who don't normally read comics. Highly recommended.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    What a fantastic idea. A counter-fantastical take on Superman, where the once Clark Kent comes to Earth in a communal farm in the Ukraine, USSR rather than the Kent farm outside Smallville, USA. Twelve hours difference in Superman's arrival is twelve hours that make all the difference. Soviet Superman works for Stalin instead of Eisenhower, and the Cold War takes a very different turn. The Warsaw Pact comes to dominate the Earth. Nixon is assassinated, Kennedy becomes a debauched old fool, Lex Lu What a fantastic idea. A counter-fantastical take on Superman, where the once Clark Kent comes to Earth in a communal farm in the Ukraine, USSR rather than the Kent farm outside Smallville, USA. Twelve hours difference in Superman's arrival is twelve hours that make all the difference. Soviet Superman works for Stalin instead of Eisenhower, and the Cold War takes a very different turn. The Warsaw Pact comes to dominate the Earth. Nixon is assassinated, Kennedy becomes a debauched old fool, Lex Luthor marries Lois Lane, James Olson is a CIA liaison, Milton Friedman becomes US President and ensures that only Chile and the USA maintain a free market economy, and Luthor creates Bizarro, a Green Lantern army, and countless supervillains -- all in an attempt to defeat the great Communist Superman. Red Superman then takes over the USSR after Stalin is assassinated, creating a world wide Utopia in a bloodless revolution. He makes a pact with Braniac (who shrinks Stalingrad for his great museum), allies with Wonder Woman, eradicates prisons with a futuristic lobotomy, and watches as a bastard son of Stalin gives rise to Batmanovic -- a counter-revolutionary obsessed with independent thought and freedom (Russo-Batman and his philosophical obsession are a pair of the graphic novel's weakest points). Mike Millar's creativity is undeniable, and the pencils by Johnson and Kilian Plunkett are perfect. But none of this is good enough. The three issue "prestige format mini-series" is far too small to accommodate a story of such strength and vision. It is merely a skeleton of something that could have been great. If each issue in the mini-series had been a year of comics, if DC had commissioned 36 issues rather than three, Red Son would have been one of the greatest comics ever written; instead, it is merely clever. I wanted to watch Superman as the Czar of the Warsaw Pact. I wanted to see his relationship with Diana/Wonder Woman unfold. I wanted to follow Lex Luthor's alternate growth as a sanctioned hero, and the ultimate move to his 5000 year Reich (a portion of the story that earned only a few pages). I wanted more of Bizarro and Braniac and the Green Lantern Corp and the Soviet Batman. I wanted MORE! So the lesson I learned from Red Son is this: less is not always more. I will forever appreciate Mark Millar's attempt at something groundbreaking, but the attempt will never mitigate my disappointment with its execution. Clever just isn't good enough. Sorry, Mr. Millar.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    "Superman: Pride of the Soviet state, symbol of our military might." Otherworld stories are the best, aren't they? My second read was better than the first because I picked up so many more details. I won't do any summary because it's far too interesting to reveal. This takes place (unofficially) on Earth 30 in the DCU. And let's just say this books contains probably the most fascinating versions of well-known characters like Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Hal Jordan, Lois Lane, Lex Luthor, Brain "Superman: Pride of the Soviet state, symbol of our military might." Otherworld stories are the best, aren't they? My second read was better than the first because I picked up so many more details. I won't do any summary because it's far too interesting to reveal. This takes place (unofficially) on Earth 30 in the DCU. And let's just say this books contains probably the most fascinating versions of well-known characters like Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Hal Jordan, Lois Lane, Lex Luthor, Brainiac, and Jimmy Olsen. Russian Batman is the coolest! I want that hat! Also featuring Joseph Stalin, Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, and Marilyn Monroe! The plot is masterfully written. It starts off slow, then it picks up speed and blasts off like a rocket. I like how morality is skewed, that it's difficult to differentiate between the heroes and villains, or if there's even a difference. I'm not familiar with any of these artists: illustrators Dave Johnson, Andrew Robinson, Kilian Plunkett, Walden Wong, colorist Paul Mounts, letterer Ken Lopez. But it looks incredible! Clean, polished, well-designed, original, and masterful without coming off as standardized. My wife is a graphic designer and I can tell that a ton of design work went into this. On the second read the ending worked much better for me. Superman finally comes to terms with who he's become and needless to say it's a shocker. I enjoyed the reveal near the end in the future, and greatly enjoyed the mind warp and twist on Superman's origin. Very clever of Mark Millar. Although I wish this was longer or had subsequent volumes (or was in Deluxe HC that was in print), rest assured it packs a punch and has moved into my top five Superman stories.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Every culture has its icons. Characters or figures that are recognizable by anybody who lives there, figures that are almost impossible not to know. And America is very good at producing those icons and spreading them worldwide. I remember reading somewhere - I don't remember where at the moment - that the United States' chief export is dreams, and I think there's definitely something to that. Of all the dreams to emerge from the American subconscious over the last century, Superman is one of the Every culture has its icons. Characters or figures that are recognizable by anybody who lives there, figures that are almost impossible not to know. And America is very good at producing those icons and spreading them worldwide. I remember reading somewhere - I don't remember where at the moment - that the United States' chief export is dreams, and I think there's definitely something to that. Of all the dreams to emerge from the American subconscious over the last century, Superman is one of the most enduring. Show that "S" shield to almost anyone on the planet and they'll probably know what it is. For most of his lifetime, he has stood for Truth, Justice and the American Way, with the third element to that tag line slowly vanishing as writers with a more global perspective take over the character. Regardless of his jingoistic past, Superman still remains a popular American figure. He represents what we would like to be, as a country. Powerful and just, upright and honest, but at the same time kind and generous and, at heart, good. Superman has the power to control the world, but he doesn't - he chooses not to - and we like to believe that it was his small-town, American upbringing that instilled such humility in him. This book examines how things might have gone. In the late '80s, DC Comics introduced their "Elseworlds" imprint, with a pretty simple mandate: take canon DC characters and place them in new situations or environments. This way you could see how Batman might have turned out in an America that had never gained its independence, or what would have happened to the JLA without Superman, or if The Flash had taken the bullet meant for JFK. It opened creative doors, allowing writers to tell new stories about familiar characters without disrupting the regular continuity of the DC Comics line. Of these, Superman: Red Son is one of the best. Mark Millar poses a simple question with a very complex answer: What if young Kal-L's rocket had landed in Soviet Ukraine instead of Kansas? What emerges is a fascinating tale of a Superman brought up under Stalinist philosophy. Still the good man that we know him to be, Superman nonetheless chooses a very different means of interacting with the world. We see from the first few pages that the man cannot stand still - he is constantly in motion trying to save people, not just in the Soviet Union, but anywhere in the world. It is his responsibility, he believes, to keep people safe, much in the manner of Soviet philosophy where the government controls nearly every aspect of its citizens' lives. Taken in by Stalin, Superman eventually rises to lead the Soviet Union to nearly world-wide dominance. Under his rule there are no accidents, no wars and no conflicts. Crime is nearly non-existent, and those who do not mesh well in this well ordered world are mentally reprogrammed until they do. There are dissidents, of course, like the mysterious Batman, a singular force of chaos in Superman's perfectly ordered world, but in the end, even he falls. The only true challenge to Superman's worldwide reign is the brilliant American scientist Lex Luthor, who has devoted his life to freeing mankind from alien tyranny. It's a brilliant take on the myth, with a lot of very familiar characters worked in. The art is gorgeous, with a style and a color palette that evokes thoughts of Soviet-era propaganda posters, yet never fails to be dynamic and fascinating. More important, however, is the message of the story. The idea that comics can have a message is something that a lot of people seem to ignore, fueling the idea that comics are just for kids. The message in Red Son is very important and very, very timely. The story was published in 2003, a time when America was in great pain. We had been badly hurt and wanted to set things right. By doing so, however, we caused far more damage to the world than we had ourselves endured. By trying to fix other people's problems, we created even more, and the harder we pushed, the more the world pushed back. And this was not a new trend - one of the negative labels often affixed to the United States is that of "world policeman." We have a long, long habit of trying to help everyone, whether that is the right thing to do or not. In that vein, the Superman of Red Son, despite being a Soviet, is a reflection of ourselves. He is a man of immense power, who decides to help everybody. His intentions are good, but good intentions are not always rewarded with good results. His world is orderly, yes - crime and violence are nearly unheard-of - but it comes at the price of individual freedom. People are no longer in control of their own destinies with Superman in charge, and while that may be a safe life, it is not one that I would like to live. The political message of this book is subtle, but it's there. More interestingly, it's a message that can be enjoyed by a broad spectrum of political views. If you're a liberal, then it's taking a stance against imperialism, against the imposition of one country's values and politics over others', all in the name of making the world a better place. If you're a conservative, it's a call for individual liberty. A government that provides everything for its people is just another form of oppression - without the freedom to make their own choices, for good or for ill, people are not truly free. In the end it's a complex tale, with no real good guys and no real bad guys. Except for Brainiac, who will probably never be anything but a bad guy. It's a story about the choices we make, both as citizens and as societies, and the understanding that we must have the freedom to make those choices. They may sometimes be the wrong ones, but making mistakes is part of the package. In the end, there can be no Superman to save us. We must save ourselves.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. (A) I don’t like Superman. (B) This is the best Superman story I’ve ever read. Twelve hours. That’s all it would have taken to change the course of history and turn the Superman we have grown up with into someone entirely different – or is he that different after all? In Red Son, the capsule from Krypton lands in Russia instead of the United States and, after the boy’s powers manifest, he is taken and raised by Joseph Stalin himself. Superman grows up a communist but, while he appreciates his adop (A) I don’t like Superman. (B) This is the best Superman story I’ve ever read. Twelve hours. That’s all it would have taken to change the course of history and turn the Superman we have grown up with into someone entirely different – or is he that different after all? In Red Son, the capsule from Krypton lands in Russia instead of the United States and, after the boy’s powers manifest, he is taken and raised by Joseph Stalin himself. Superman grows up a communist but, while he appreciates his adoptive father’s ideals, he does not approve of the violent methods. Stalin is grooming him to rule in his stead – just as the people want – but Superman cares nothing for politics. He just wants to help people. I loved this idea because I originally thought that the major motivation behind Superman’s desire to help everyone was primarily instilled in him by Ma and Pa Kent. This implies that it truly is his nature. I adored the scene with Stalin’s jealous son Pyotr who rages at Superman’s compulsive need to fix everything. When Stalin is murdered, Superman discovers that his super powers can’t save people from poverty. He realizes that the only way he can help everyone is to become president. He puts Russia in order and moves on to the entire world, with only the United States stubbornly refusing him. All the while, the brilliant Lex Luthor continually attempts to defeat Superman in new and interesting ways. This is a what if? story, but one that doesn’t just skim over the details or throw characters into this alternate realm without good reason for their existence*. Several popular DC characters appear in this story and I was very impressed with their manifestations. I loved how much depth Millar goes into for all the characters, even if for some it is brief. Even though this was an alternate version of the characters, I learned far more about them all than I ever have in their main stories. *The only character portrayal that really bothered me was Lois Lane – er Lois Luthor. The feisty, bull-headed reporter we know doesn’t really show her head here at all. Instead, we get Jean Grey without the Phoenix entity – a woman defined by the two important male figures in the story. Rather than being Superman’s girl, though they share that brief spark, she’s with Lex who doesn’t give a damn about her because he’s too busy being level 9 intelligence awesome. I would have liked to see Lois as a balancing force in Luthor’s life, but instead he discards her as his focus on Superman intensifies. At least he is polite enough to call her to let her know. And Lois just accepts this. While I appreciate her devotion and determination to stand by her man despite him having no obvious need for her, I just do not see this as Lois Lane and I don’t see any justification for her being with Luthor just because she isn’t with Superman in this incarnation. I was also a bit concerned with Luthor’s sociopathic portrayal as it began as somewhat caricature-ish. I prefer the Animated Series Luthor who is ridiculously intelligent, but not unaware of emotions. To me, that Luthor simply chooses not to acknowledge emotions, but recognizes that he and others have them and is able to factor emotion into any equation. This Luthor seems oblivious; closer to a mad scientist archetype. But by the end of the book, I was content with where Luthor’s careful machinations ended up. Otherwise, I loved the incarnations of Wonder Woman – the utter joy she expresses when she tells Superman that she’s happy to finally be talking to someone who can understand her and the sad realization when she comes to understand him. Batman – who’s parents death forges the same man, but this man isn’t merely a well funded crime fighter, and he's willing to go to any length to bring down Superman and the oppressive communist regime. The Green Lantern Corp and the selection of Hal Jordan as recipient of the ring makes so much more sense than what I’ve known in the past. And I loved poor, naïve Superman himself – yeah, you heard me. Millar takes the time to show us how smart Superman is, but makes it clear that reading a book really fast and retaining the knowledge does not equate with wisdom. Add to that his misguided idealism and Superman is a deadly force. He is so desperate to help everyone and fix everything that he doesn’t realize that we need be able to help ourselves. I love that Millar didn’t let Superman merely figure this out in the finale. It’s an issue that Superman himself raises and discusses with Diana, but ultimately fails to comprehend as he tightens his grip on humanity in desperate need to protect and fix us. And oh gods when everything came full circle in the end? Just. Brilliant.

  12. 4 out of 5

    J.G. Keely

    The fact that I only became an aficionado of comic books in college while receiving a degree in literary analysis gives me a slightly different take on the medium. For example: my understanding of Superman and Batman come mostly from reading the odder, subversive versions of them (Frank Miller's 'Dark Knight Returns', Loeb's 'Hush', Moore's 'Killing Joke') as well as allusive explorations of what the characters could have been (Astro City, Watchmen, Powers, Invincible, Enigma). Though I do have c The fact that I only became an aficionado of comic books in college while receiving a degree in literary analysis gives me a slightly different take on the medium. For example: my understanding of Superman and Batman come mostly from reading the odder, subversive versions of them (Frank Miller's 'Dark Knight Returns', Loeb's 'Hush', Moore's 'Killing Joke') as well as allusive explorations of what the characters could have been (Astro City, Watchmen, Powers, Invincible, Enigma). Though I do have cultural knowledge of their stories through various film and television permutations, tackling them as comic book characters is a more involved endeavor. That being said, I think I've enjoyed learning about them more through repeated references in other books than by trying to tackle them in the classic ongoing storylines, where the endless clones, faked deaths, deus ex machina endings, de-powerings, and gorilla weddings might begin to detract form character- building. Red Son was an interesting concept, exploring the myths of the characters with a simple experiment: change one variable and see what stays the same. Unfortunately, Millar's writing once again comes up short. He's such an awkward, adolescent goof that he can't quite get things to make sense. It's not as bad as his terrible later work, but it's not as interesting as the concept. The ending is almost interesting, playing with the idea of time travel, but it doesn't actually mean anything for the world or characters, so it ends up being a bit of flash that might feel smart, of you don't think about it. Part of what makes mainline comics dull and wacky is the fact that stories always get reset, things are always the same, over and over, and its rare that an author gets to actually explore a character in a meaningful way. Even if they do make an interesting change, the next author will just revert it, usually with some kind of stupid doombot/deal with the devil twist that makes no sense. But here's an example of the fact that getting wacky and really changing continuity isn't any more interesting, because unless there's strong writing behind it, the concept will still fall flat. My Suggested Reading In Comics

  13. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    The idea of reimagining Superman as a Soviet hero instead of an American one could've led to so many great political, moral, and societal questions, but instead Millar goes out of his way to write Superman as the exact same boring, perfect character we've seen for 70 years. We see all the same villains acting pretty much exactly how they always act. He isn't raised by the Kents in Kansas. He's raised in the Ukraine by some farmers we never meet, and yet still has the exact same moral compass as The idea of reimagining Superman as a Soviet hero instead of an American one could've led to so many great political, moral, and societal questions, but instead Millar goes out of his way to write Superman as the exact same boring, perfect character we've seen for 70 years. We see all the same villains acting pretty much exactly how they always act. He isn't raised by the Kents in Kansas. He's raised in the Ukraine by some farmers we never meet, and yet still has the exact same moral compass as the mainstream Superman. In this reality, Lois Lane is married to Lex Luthor. In some spectacularly cheesy and pointless scenes, Superman meets Lois and thinks "In another life, I could've married her." Who cares?! We KNOW the real Superman loves Lois Lane! What this story needs is a SOVIET OUTLOOK. Instead, we're treated to a Soviet Union that just completely changes its actions thanks to Superman being in charge. The traditional Superman upholds American beliefs. The red one should've done the same, instead of changing the Soviet beliefs to match his own hyper-moral character. Oh, except for one thing. Superman is shown to be a force of kindness and good throughout this story, and yet he eventually starts brainwashing anyone who disagrees with him. This seems to be done solely to suddenly and inexplicably introduce a "bad side" of Superman, which never even matters. This kind of uneven, poorly planned nonsense happens throughout the book, which is only saved by the art and a few decent action scenes. An incredibly disappointing, squandered opportunity.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    Red Son is an elseworlds story positing what might have happened if the pod carrying the infant Superman would have crash landed on a farm in the Soviet Union under Stalin's rule. It's a pretty awesome idea for an elseworlds story, but I thought it could have been much better than it was. I suppose I can cut some slack for the fact that it was only three issues long. The idea behind the overarching plot, though it comes at it from an entirely different setup, is that superheroes have the ability Red Son is an elseworlds story positing what might have happened if the pod carrying the infant Superman would have crash landed on a farm in the Soviet Union under Stalin's rule. It's a pretty awesome idea for an elseworlds story, but I thought it could have been much better than it was. I suppose I can cut some slack for the fact that it was only three issues long. The idea behind the overarching plot, though it comes at it from an entirely different setup, is that superheroes have the ability to change the world and help humanity - but should they? It’s sort of another riff on the "With great power comes great responsibility" idea - or maybe more along the lines of "Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely." The questions of this nature explored in Red Son are very similar to the questions asked in Kingdom Come. But where Kingdom Come posits that Superman is ultimately sort of more human than human, and would never forget his roots even if he got a little distracted in a quest to make the world a better place, Red Son seems to be saying that just being born and raised in Communist Russia would take things to an entirely different and necessarily bad end, that his desire to help humanity would inadvertently lead to his becoming a dictator. In a way this makes sense; Clark Kent is so inherent to Superman's character, and the very concept of him. It's interesting to think about what Superman would be like if Clark Kent were not the really good guy we know and love, but someone else entirely - 'born' somewhere else, and raised by different people in a different environment. But I think it's a little insulting to say that, even without changing much else in his upbringing - still growing up among hard working farm folk, even if they aren't gone into in any detail - just growing up in Communist Russia would take away all the goodness in Superman that would keep him from becoming the controlling leader of a totalitarian regime. It also portrays the perfect society Superman builds as being inherently flawed, while the virtually identical one Luther replaces it with is somehow happier and more stable, which just seems like rhetoric to me. That being said, the book is in many ways equally as critical of both anarchist martyrs and capitalist demi-gods. It seems to highlight the goods and ills of all three main political dogmas. And truthfully, it is only all the people opposed to Superman in the book who seem to think he is power mad and selfish. Superman is actually portrayed more as being caught up in the whirlwind and just wanting to help, which seems more natural to me. I suppose in a way, because he is so perfect, and because of his unfailing black and white morals, Superman always leans toward the line of Fascism - like Captain America, perhaps. That's something that gets to be explored more in this book, and I appreciate that. As far as form goes, the story is a bit rushed. A lot happens very fast, and for all the major player cameos that are given space (there's even an elseworlds communist Batman origin story and an unresolved revenge plot going along with that) there are other things not gone into enough or completely left out. Superman's childhood is pretty much glossed over - if the book is supposedly positing that a different origin/upbringing would change who Superman is (something I agree with and find fascinating) it would be nice if they focused on all aspects of that. I don't know very many (or any!) people whose entire personalities are formed more by their national climate and surrounding political dogma than by their parents and childhood experiences. I also think other books set around the cold war have given a better feel of what that time was like. Red Son, for all its emphasis on the Soviet Union and the competition with the United States, doesn't portray that period with any weight or realistic feeling. I also think the tone and voice of Superman are all wrong; he doesn't read like Superman at all - which is maybe to be understood, given the changes made to his character - but he doesn't seem much like a Stalinist either. He doesn't even sound Russian, in tone or mannerism. (I'm glad they avoided giving him some kind of dialect accent, though.) And finally, the book has an interesting looping effect in the story that I'm not sure I like... I think it's a bit cheesy. I also thought that the way Luthor finally 'defeats' Superman was a bit lame. Overall Red Son has a really cool concept, and despite all the little things that I found to be disappointing in the execution of story, it is interesting and entertaining this is probably one of the better Superman stories around. It can be hard to relate to the ever perfect man of steel, and sometimes his character is about as interesting or accessible as a cement wall. He seems to flourish in elseworlds stories, though, and Red Son is an excellent example of that.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    One of the best entries in the now defunct Elseworlds line. I miss seeing creators take imaginative risks with characters, but very few have paid off as completely as Millar's Red Son. It's a pretty simple, almost natural concept: what if, instead of landing in Kansas and becoming the prototype All American hero, Kal-El's little ship had landed in the USSR and he had become the prototype All Soviet hero? Millar clearly put an incredible amount of thought into his new reality. I can't recall a si One of the best entries in the now defunct Elseworlds line. I miss seeing creators take imaginative risks with characters, but very few have paid off as completely as Millar's Red Son. It's a pretty simple, almost natural concept: what if, instead of landing in Kansas and becoming the prototype All American hero, Kal-El's little ship had landed in the USSR and he had become the prototype All Soviet hero? Millar clearly put an incredible amount of thought into his new reality. I can't recall a single moment when I was reading along and thought to myself, "Wait, what about...?" because he had it all covered. I may not have thoroughly agreed with every decision he made (why would Jimmy suddenly be a CIA agent instead of a news photographer, other than that the story needed a familiar face in that position?) but nothing was outrageous or nonsensical. Except maybe the little fur hat Batman wears, but nothing's perfect. There are several good twists in the ending, but it still feels a little drawn out. Or, maybe, not drawn out enough. At the end, thousands of years are passing in just a few panels. I'm not sure it would have been better to fill in more details or to skip the time lapse entirely, but as is it's at a nicely awkward length. A bit of a step down from what was, until that point, an engaging book set at a good pace. Still, it's exactly the sort of thing that makes me miss Elseworlds.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. What if one of the greatest superheroes of all time didn’t have his rocketship crash-land in Smallville, Kansas? What if he were to have it rerouted into the Soviet Union? Would Superman grow up to become the same hero we have all known and rooted for? Under the hands of the great writer Mark Millar, we are presented with one of the best Elseworlds stories that has ever been written. Best-selling writer of the Kick-Ass series, Wolverine: Old Man You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. What if one of the greatest superheroes of all time didn’t have his rocketship crash-land in Smallville, Kansas? What if he were to have it rerouted into the Soviet Union? Would Superman grow up to become the same hero we have all known and rooted for? Under the hands of the great writer Mark Millar, we are presented with one of the best Elseworlds stories that has ever been written. Best-selling writer of the Kick-Ass series, Wolverine: Old Man Logan, Civil War (A Marvel Comics Event) and Wanted, among other comics, Mark Millar reimagines the mythology behind the Man of Steel and creates an alien superman surrounded with communist ideals whose very existence threatens to alter the position of the United States as a world superpower during the Cold War. Portrayed as the champion of the common worker, this Superman fights a « never-ending battle for Stalin, socialism and the international expansion of the Warsaw pact ». Throughout the story a whole lot of various known characters are introduced in this stand-alone story. From Jimmy Olsen to Lois Lane, Mark Millar does an impeccable job in putting these key characters from Superman’s lore in unique positions that create dynamics that you’d never thought you’d ever see them in. As if it wasn’t enough to be immersed in this particular political landscape, an homage to the DC mythology that respects the core essence of each superheroes’ lore and the very foundation of their relationship to each other is interspersed within the narrative in a very spectacular fashion. The best part of it all, as a personal fanboy of course, is the introduction of Batmankøff—yes, you read that right. The crux of his well-known story is brought into Superman: Red Son and turns him into an anarchist with a very furry hat. While Superman might see Russia as his home, an inevitable a destined adversary also seeks to take him down in America. Indeed. It is none other than Lex Luthor. Their singular rivalry is illustrated as something incontestable, as if it were destiny. The traits that are often attributed to both Lex Luthor and Superman are still easily discernible in their actions and arguments as one vouches to help the common man while the other is in it to help himself. While their personalities were perfectly nailed, it is also safe to mention that Mark Millar doesn’t miss the mark with every other character in this story, even if they don’t have as much panel-time. Even the twist to their personalities are genuine, believable and entertaining beyond reproach. With artwork that complements the quality of this story, there’s simply nothing that I could complain about. Pencillers Dave Johnson and Killian Plunkett bring all these characters to life with great designs that remain inspiring till the end. With iconic moments infused at a consistent and clever rate, this story packs a punch that promises to keep this story gripping from cover to cover. Inkers Andrew Robinson and Walden Wong, as well as colourist Paul Mounts, complete the artwork with outstanding details by setting the unique mood of the era. This story doesn’t only revel in its original take on these iconic characters during a time-period that we’re all so familiar with. It is also a look at the American and Russian politics and their long-standing complex relationship throughout time. Throughout the narrative, a whole analysis of two different political systems are explored (capitalism and communism) without ever dragging this action-packed story to the ground. What really sealed the deal with this story is the mind-blowing and twisted ending. As you think that you’ve seen it all coming and that things would end on a very America-is-glorious tone, the story adds in a whole time-altering and paradigm-shifting ending that simply puts a smile on your face. Easily, Superman: Red Son is a story that absolutely anyone could pick up and enjoy. Long-time fans of DC heroes will also undoubtedly find even more joy in seeing how Mark Millar twists countless heroes’ origin story and creates one of the best Elseworlds story that I have ever read. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  17. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    This is a good example of the difference between graphic novels and comic books. While, yes, this does feature Superman and Lex Luthor, this is as stark a departure you can get from Superman's Action Comics roots. It basically inverts everything you know about Superman by asking one simple question -- What if Superman's ship crashed in Soviet Russia instead of Kansas? Well exactly what happens I won't spoil, but it starts with Superman as Stalin's champion of Socialism, Louis Lane married to Lex This is a good example of the difference between graphic novels and comic books. While, yes, this does feature Superman and Lex Luthor, this is as stark a departure you can get from Superman's Action Comics roots. It basically inverts everything you know about Superman by asking one simple question -- What if Superman's ship crashed in Soviet Russia instead of Kansas? Well exactly what happens I won't spoil, but it starts with Superman as Stalin's champion of Socialism, Louis Lane married to Lex Luthor, and Jimmy Olsen as an agent in the CIA's Anti-Superman division, and later weaves in excellent sequences with an American Bizarro, a Soviet Batman, and Lex Luthor as the U.S. President. The story is told in shades of grey, as Superman is still doing what he believes to be morally right, while Luthor is just as villainous as ever. But with their allegiances reversed, it really punches the reader in the gut. The climax also lives up to the rest of the story, with earned twists and revelations, and the aftermath is as mind-bending as it is perfect. I only wish there were more pages dedicated to fleshing out some of the plot points -- such as the Brainiac attack, the Green Lantern Corps, and the mind control devices worn by rebellious comrades in Superman's Soviet regime. But all in all, this is a rare, must-read Superman story, as this is exactly the kind of out-of-the-box scenario it takes to make Superman a truly interesting character.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne

    This is part of my 'i gotta read more superman shit' plan and all it did was make me love batman more how does that happen, like leave Bruce i'm working on this highly scientific plan. I put off reading this for ages because i study history and the last thing i wanna do is read more history, especially altered fictional accounts of history but i needn't of worried. Russian history is my jam so i think i was expecting something different, maybe more political but it doesn't, it's mainly just supe This is part of my 'i gotta read more superman shit' plan and all it did was make me love batman more how does that happen, like leave Bruce i'm working on this highly scientific plan. I put off reading this for ages because i study history and the last thing i wanna do is read more history, especially altered fictional accounts of history but i needn't of worried. Russian history is my jam so i think i was expecting something different, maybe more political but it doesn't, it's mainly just superman being dumped into russia instead of the usa, so if you're put of reading this cause you know jack shit about the cold war, don't worry you don't need to catch up on your a-level history, you're good to go. I really liked it though, was something different, superman being bff's with stalin is just so weird. It was pretty interesting to see how these well known characters fit within this world and it just weirdly works. Gotta mention Batsy because i can't help myself, he is pretty bad ass in this, he's like swallowing bombs, wearing cool ass hats literally no shits to give like yes i am on board with this! Definitely worth picking up, although i usually love Millar's stuff so maybe thats why i liked it as much but it's good one!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nicolo Yu

    Mark Millar reinvents Superman into a Soviet superhero in this Elseworlds story appropriately named, "Red Son". What if the craft carrying Kal-El landed in Soviet heartland instead of Kansas? Millar writes a compelling and ultimately re-readable story of Superman ended up behind the Iron Curtain. It definitely changed how superheroes emerged for once and a Russian Batman emerges with a different reason for existing. This went one for two-thirds of the story, until Millar revealed his trump card. Mark Millar reinvents Superman into a Soviet superhero in this Elseworlds story appropriately named, "Red Son". What if the craft carrying Kal-El landed in Soviet heartland instead of Kansas? Millar writes a compelling and ultimately re-readable story of Superman ended up behind the Iron Curtain. It definitely changed how superheroes emerged for once and a Russian Batman emerges with a different reason for existing. This went one for two-thirds of the story, until Millar revealed his trump card. Superman's ideological allegiance was not the only part of the mythos he was giving a different interpretation. That one is for the reader. It's a integral part of the whole story and one should read it to enjoy. (view spoiler)[(Hint: It's about the origin of House El). (hide spoiler)]

  20. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    OK, so I recalled reading this, but I think I got it confused with Last Son of Krypton...because there's no WAY I wouldn't have gushed about how awesome this book is. Superman: Red So(u)n (You'll get it.) is, quite possibly, Mark Millar's finest work. This book is so full of little teasers and links to the original DCU that it's like a Where's Waldo game to find them all...I only read once, and I saw a few that were AWESOME. I could literally gush about this non-stop. It was one of those few books OK, so I recalled reading this, but I think I got it confused with Last Son of Krypton...because there's no WAY I wouldn't have gushed about how awesome this book is. Superman: Red So(u)n (You'll get it.) is, quite possibly, Mark Millar's finest work. This book is so full of little teasers and links to the original DCU that it's like a Where's Waldo game to find them all...I only read once, and I saw a few that were AWESOME. I could literally gush about this non-stop. It was one of those few books you read the panels over and over again just because it's so F'n awesome. It's also one where you cover the next page with your hand because you don't want to get ahead of things at all, you want to inhabit this story in real time. Millar has also done the impossible, and made a major character even better than I thought possible. (hint: I'm not talking about the main character.) Millar has taken the essence of what makes each character we encounter important, and twisted it around just enough to remain interesting, while still, importantly enough, remaining true to each character's roots. I don't want to give away too much, because reading this without any spoilers or clues other than the title and the obvious fact that Superman was going to be a Soviet Comrade instead of an American Citizen. If I was to sum up in words how much I loved this book...I think it would be: To the Power of Oh...then there's the ending. Mind. Blown. BOOM. I was so jazzed I said out loud "Holy S**t!" My wife came in to ask me what was wrong...then she saw the comic book, and started crying for some reason...anyhow. YAY! COMIC BOOK AWESOME! So so so so sooo good. I might not be able to be friends with you if you don't really enjoy this. Get this review and more at:

  21. 5 out of 5

    Pinkerton

    Dovete-leggere-questo-fumetto. Una reinterpretazione da applausi su alcuni dei personaggi di maggior rilievo della scuderia DC. Prendete l’azzurrone, il simbolo americano per eccellenza (un po’ come Cap lo è per la Marvel) e trasformatelo nel comunista n°1, ma uno di quelli da guerra fredda. All’inizio si parte con prevedibili luoghi comuni – che sono comunque uno spettacolo per il contrasto visivo che rappresentano rispetto al solito – e dopo questo tour, si parte: Intrighi politici e una situa Dovete-leggere-questo-fumetto. Una reinterpretazione da applausi su alcuni dei personaggi di maggior rilievo della scuderia DC. Prendete l’azzurrone, il simbolo americano per eccellenza (un po’ come Cap lo è per la Marvel) e trasformatelo nel comunista n°1, ma uno di quelli da guerra fredda. All’inizio si parte con prevedibili luoghi comuni – che sono comunque uno spettacolo per il contrasto visivo che rappresentano rispetto al solito – e dopo questo tour, si parte: Intrighi politici e una situazione che rende impossibile distinguere l’utopia dalla distopia ma soprattutto, il ruolo iconico che rivestono. Evidente tanto sul costume di questo Superman quanto nel leader degli scontenti, l’anarchia in nero, Batman. Il triangolo che coinvolge Wonder Woman (cacchio alcune sequenze in cui è presente mi hanno fatto venire le palpitazioni), l’evolversi degli eventi ed un modo così adulto di affrontare tutta la storia, sviluppandola non banalizzandola in una semplice scazzottata ma facendo dell’ideologia il perno centrale. È incredibile ed encomiabile quanta drammaticità, e sacrificio!, Millar sia riuscito a mettere in un racconto che inizia e finisce tutto qui, solo in questo volume. Si potrebbe chiamarlo uno what if… ma io preferisco definirlo semplicemente capolavoro. Toccante e riflessivo, talmente bello che andrebbe conservato in una bottiglia ;)

  22. 5 out of 5

    J

    Holy mother of god. This was amazing. I want to say this is the second best comic I have ever read, second only to Watchmen. Ideally prospective readers of this would have at least moderate knowledge of the DC Universe to catch all of the references to other heroes and events. But having moderate knowledge of twentieth century history is also really beneficial. Luckily, I'm a history major and a comic nerd, so I have both. I don't want to get into the plot too much as to avoid spoilers, but basica Holy mother of god. This was amazing. I want to say this is the second best comic I have ever read, second only to Watchmen. Ideally prospective readers of this would have at least moderate knowledge of the DC Universe to catch all of the references to other heroes and events. But having moderate knowledge of twentieth century history is also really beneficial. Luckily, I'm a history major and a comic nerd, so I have both. I don't want to get into the plot too much as to avoid spoilers, but basically Superman lands in the Ukraine instead of Kansas and is raised with Communist ideals, but he's still a good guy who doesn't want to kill anyone. At first reluctant to take power upon Stalin's death, he eventually realizes he needs to save the Soviet Union from poverty and crime and whatnot. So he does, and then his utopian (albeit totalitarian) rule expands nonviolently across the world, excluding the United States who have their own problems with this creeping communism. But basically the world turns completely totalitarian and then utopian and then (view spoiler)[ Earth blows up, but we are led to believe that the world has reverted into some minor form of dystopia at this point (hide spoiler)] . And then there's a killer twist at the end that almost knocked me out of my chair. But knowing about the DC Universe allows you to catch references to Oliver Queen, Barry Allen, etc. And knowing about recent history allows you to catch references to historical figures and events that happened differently (because alternate history). This was definitely right up my alley. The artwork was awesome, the dialogue was awesome, and the plot was phenomenal. I'll admit it took a little while to get going, but it picked up very well. I wouldn't call it exciting, but it's definitely gripping.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Danger

    As far as I’ve read into the character, this trade paperback (three issues long) is, in my opinion, the best Superman story. Even better than Morrison’s All-Star Superman. Using a ‘what-if’ scenario as the jumping off point (what if Superman landed in the Soviet Union in the late 30s as opposed to Smallville, Kansas) this really re-explores the DC Universe in a world in which Superman wasn’t fighting for the “American Way” but rather communist ideals. While not giving firm answers on the right a As far as I’ve read into the character, this trade paperback (three issues long) is, in my opinion, the best Superman story. Even better than Morrison’s All-Star Superman. Using a ‘what-if’ scenario as the jumping off point (what if Superman landed in the Soviet Union in the late 30s as opposed to Smallville, Kansas) this really re-explores the DC Universe in a world in which Superman wasn’t fighting for the “American Way” but rather communist ideals. While not giving firm answers on the right and wrong of a communist vs. capitalist utopia (it's murky at best) Superman does fall victim to his own hubris, as does Lex Luthor, who becomes President of the United States for his opposition to the alien. And the ending to this was almost Asmovian in its implication and perfection. I really dug this book, and if you’re even a passing DC or comics fan, this one is a can’t miss title.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Miriam

    What if the ship carrying infant Kal-l had crashed in Russia instead of America, and Superman had grown up to become a Soviet superhero, subduing the world for communism? Great idea, although I would have liked a slightly longer book with more time to get in depth characterization and explore more history.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jesse A

    My favorite Superman book so far. Brilliant!!!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Roy

    A very cool What if story. Superman, Russia, communism, Lex Luthor/USA...makes a cool story.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Hayden

    Twelve hours was all it took. Twelve hours, and the ship containing Kal-El (aka young Superman) didn't crash in Smallville Kansas, wasn't raised by Jonathan and Martha Kent, never went on to become the mighty symbol of American superiority. Twelve hours and Superman lands in the USSR, Communist-controlled Russia, and becomes the apprentice of Joseph Stalin; a young, indestructible Demigod hellbent on spreading Communism worldwide. I don't know why I bought this. I hate Superman as a character (I Twelve hours was all it took. Twelve hours, and the ship containing Kal-El (aka young Superman) didn't crash in Smallville Kansas, wasn't raised by Jonathan and Martha Kent, never went on to become the mighty symbol of American superiority. Twelve hours and Superman lands in the USSR, Communist-controlled Russia, and becomes the apprentice of Joseph Stalin; a young, indestructible Demigod hellbent on spreading Communism worldwide. I don't know why I bought this. I hate Superman as a character (I think his concept is too worn out to work in today's world), and I wasn't impressed by Mark Millar's Kick-Ass (I thought the film was a vast improvement on the graphic novel). But this was absolutely mindblowing. Millar essentially ran through the entire DC universe in a 200 page book. Lex Luthor is a brilliant government scientist obsessed with destroying the Soviet's Superpower, who sees the human race as pieces in his game of chess; Superman is a broken man, driven by his dream of turning Earth into a communist Utopia, a perfect world free of crime and accidents; Batman is an underground resistance leader in Moscow with ties to President Kennedy; Wonder Woman is an independent woman, haunted by the sacrifice she once made for the Man Of Steel; and the Green Lantern ring crash landed in Roswell New Mexico in 1947 before attaching itself to a young Air Force pilot named Hal Jordan (you might have heard of him). What surprised me even more was how the story stays out of the black & white Russia-bad-America-good type thing. It doesn't judge it's characters, leaving the reader to decide who's right and who's wrong (and believe me, you will change sides frequently). Red Son is an epic character drama that pits one of the oldest hero/villain pairs in one of the best superhero comics I've read since Watchmen, and draws it all down in a Kubrick-esque conclusion. I don't think I'll be able to get this one out of my head for awhile. 5/5

  28. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    What-If Superman story that imagines the man of steel crashing into a Ukrainian commune instead of a small Kansas farm, then going full alt-history from there. There were all sorts of reasons I shouldn't have liked this: the dialogue isn't great, the plotting and pacing is all over the map, the female character are all terribly crafted. But... I still kind of enjoyed it? There's an energy and verve to this comic that wound up kind of winning me over despite its flaws. It's helped along by some v What-If Superman story that imagines the man of steel crashing into a Ukrainian commune instead of a small Kansas farm, then going full alt-history from there. There were all sorts of reasons I shouldn't have liked this: the dialogue isn't great, the plotting and pacing is all over the map, the female character are all terribly crafted. But... I still kind of enjoyed it? There's an energy and verve to this comic that wound up kind of winning me over despite its flaws. It's helped along by some very fun, propaganda-inspired art and Batman in a ushanka. It introduced a lot of interesting issues but then failed to really explore them in much depth, though it's very possible that I missed some of the nuance along the way since I only have a superficial understanding of the Superman mythos. I do wish that the comic either decided to really explore Superman as a character (in a nice nature/nurture case study, as a friend pointed out) or decided to really delve into the politics. It dances around both, but never fully commit enough to make it really special. There several moments that are probably fun for DC fans - Lois Lane is married to Lex Luthor?!? - but they're lazily done. I mean, why is Lois married to him? He's a total dick to her, and she seems entirely indifferent to him? Jimmy Olsen is there; he doesn't really do anything. Wonder Woman is great for a couple of panels and then the writers are mean to her, then forget about her for no particular reason. Still, despite all of this, I can't say I didn't enjoy it. How can you not like this:

  29. 5 out of 5

    JB

    Great take on the Superman story. This book tells the story of what would/could have happend if Superman's ship had landed in the Soviet Union. I didn't like Superman as a person in this. As to be expected, growing up in the Soviet Union made him into another man entirely. He becomes a dictator, but for all the right reasons. At least that's what he thinks. I like how they came up with the alternate  stories of Batman and Green Lantern. Everything fell into place. In the end the Brainiac revelati Great take on the Superman story. This book tells the story of what would/could have happend if Superman's ship had landed in the Soviet Union. I didn't like Superman as a person in this. As to be expected, growing up in the Soviet Union made him into another man entirely. He becomes a dictator, but for all the right reasons. At least that's what he thinks. I like how they came up with the alternate  stories of Batman and Green Lantern. Everything fell into place. In the end the Brainiac revelation was great! And what about the last five pages? They blew my mind. Very unexpected ending to a great and original story.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Miguel

    Cumple la función de todo elseworld, sin caer en el panfleto lo cual es muy destacable así que es difícil encontrar algo que decir que ya no se haya hecho, me agrado lo "ruso" que era todo, en el sentido estereotipico de la palabra, pero aun así, una visión fresca del mito de superman, quizás un poco decepcionado con el final, porque se había dado la oportunidad perfecta para unirlo con el mundo original, pero el resto, perfecto.

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