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A Doll's Houseis a three-act play in prose by Henrik Ibsen. It premiered at the Royal Theatre in Copenhagen, Denmark, on 21 December 1879, having been published earlier that month. The play is significant for its critical attitude toward 19th-century marriage norms. It aroused great controversy at the time, as it concludes with the protagonist, Nora, leaving her husband an A Doll's Houseis a three-act play in prose by Henrik Ibsen. It premiered at the Royal Theatre in Copenhagen, Denmark, on 21 December 1879, having been published earlier that month. The play is significant for its critical attitude toward 19th-century marriage norms. It aroused great controversy at the time, as it concludes with the protagonist, Nora, leaving her husband and children because she wants to discover herself. Ibsen was inspired by the belief that "a woman cannot be herself in modern society," since it is "an exclusively male society, with laws made by men and with prosecutors and judges who assess feminine conduct from a masculine standpoint." Its ideas can also be seen as having a wider application: Michael Meyer argued that the play's theme is not women's rights, but rather "the need of every individual to find out the kind of person he or she really is and to strive to become that person." In a speech given to the Norwegian Association for Women's Rights in 1898, Ibsen insisted that he "must disclaim the honor of having consciously worked for the women's rights movement," since he wrote "without any conscious thought of making propaganda," his task having been "the description of humanity."


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A Doll's Houseis a three-act play in prose by Henrik Ibsen. It premiered at the Royal Theatre in Copenhagen, Denmark, on 21 December 1879, having been published earlier that month. The play is significant for its critical attitude toward 19th-century marriage norms. It aroused great controversy at the time, as it concludes with the protagonist, Nora, leaving her husband an A Doll's Houseis a three-act play in prose by Henrik Ibsen. It premiered at the Royal Theatre in Copenhagen, Denmark, on 21 December 1879, having been published earlier that month. The play is significant for its critical attitude toward 19th-century marriage norms. It aroused great controversy at the time, as it concludes with the protagonist, Nora, leaving her husband and children because she wants to discover herself. Ibsen was inspired by the belief that "a woman cannot be herself in modern society," since it is "an exclusively male society, with laws made by men and with prosecutors and judges who assess feminine conduct from a masculine standpoint." Its ideas can also be seen as having a wider application: Michael Meyer argued that the play's theme is not women's rights, but rather "the need of every individual to find out the kind of person he or she really is and to strive to become that person." In a speech given to the Norwegian Association for Women's Rights in 1898, Ibsen insisted that he "must disclaim the honor of having consciously worked for the women's rights movement," since he wrote "without any conscious thought of making propaganda," his task having been "the description of humanity."

30 review for A Doll's House (Illustrated): Classic Edition

  1. 5 out of 5

    Huda Yahya

    تعبت الدمية تعبت من الخيوط تحرك رأسها وذراعيها وتجبر قدميها على السير في طريق لا تبتغيه تعبت الدمية من الزينة ومن المنزل الملون بالزيف ومن السند المائل ومن التقاليد السخيفة ومن واجبات وقيود أشد سخافة قررت نورا أن تذهب لأجل نفسها لأجل هذا الشيء الذي كان عليها أن ترضيه لتستطيع أن تعيش لأنها في الحقيقة من لحم ودم وأعصاب وأسلاك عقلها تعمل تماما مثلها مثل أي ذكر فرضت عليها الدنيا أن توقره لمجرد أنه يحمل اسم رجل نورا ليست بدمية فكان عليها أن تترك بيت الدمى وتتنفس للمرة الأولى :::::::::::: نورا : لست أبالي بما يقول تعبت الدمية تعبت من الخيوط تحرك رأسها وذراعيها وتجبر قدميها على السير في طريق لا تبتغيه تعبت الدمية من الزينة ومن المنزل الملون بالزيف ومن السند المائل ومن التقاليد السخيفة ومن واجبات وقيود أشد سخافة قررت نورا أن تذهب لأجل نفسها لأجل هذا الشيء الذي كان عليها أن ترضيه لتستطيع أن تعيش‏ لأنها في الحقيقة من لحم ودم وأعصاب وأسلاك عقلها تعمل تماما مثلها مثل ‏أي ذكر فرضت عليها الدنيا أن توقره لمجرد أنه يحمل اسم رجل نورا ليست بدمية ‏ فكان عليها أن تترك بيت الدمى وتتنفس للمرة الأولى :::::::::::: ‏نورا : لست أبالي بما يقوله الناس ، فلا بد لي أن أذهب‎ . هيلمر : دون اكتراث بأقدس واجباتك ؟‎ نورا : وما هي أقدس واجباتي في نظرك ؟‎ هيلمر : وهل هذه مسألة تحتاج إلى شرح ؟ إنها واجباتك نحو زوجك ‏وأولادك‎ . نورا : لدي واجبات أخرى لا تقل عنها قداسة‎ . هيلمر : غير معقول . ماهي ؟‎ نورا : واجباتي نحو نفسي‎ . هيلمر : أنت زوجة وأم لأطفالي قبل أي شيء آخر‎ نورا : لم أعد أؤمن بذلك . إنني مخلوق آدمي عاقل .. مثلك تماماً .‏ ‎ :::::::::::: المسرحية مكتوبة في القرن التاسع عشر لم تصمت نورا حينها هربت من السيرك المزيف قالت : لا فلتخبروني إذا عن كل نورا منذ تاريخ نشر المسرحية ‏ ‎1879‎ كم نورا تعرفها أو تعرفينها..؟ كم نورا تقرأ كلماتي الآن .. وتغتصب ابتسامة في وجه من لا يستحقها راضخة..صامتة..مستسلمة.. نحن الآن في القرن الحادي والعشرين وهناك آلاف مثل نورا في كل مجتمع تبتلع اهانتها يوميا وتصمت ترضخ لاضطهادها يوميا في كل مكان‏ بيت ابيها بيت زوجها تسلط أخيها نظرات المارة التي لا ترحم المواصلات العامة..المدرسة..الجامعة..العمل كل مكان يشيئها ويحيلها كائن ضعيف مسكين مشتهى عليه ألا يضحك وألا يعلو صوته ‏ وألا يعترض وألا يرتدي هذا أو ذاك‏ فهو فتنة ولعنة ونعمة ومسرة ونصف الدنيا المجني عليه أبدا دوما دوما ‏ عليها أن ترضي الجميع ولا ترضي نفسها أبدا أبدا :::::::::::: المسرحية عظيمة كعظمة إبسن رائد المسرح الأشهر والذي بسطرين في آخر المسرحية أطلق آلاف من الآهات المختزنة عبر العصور صفقت نورا الباب وراءها ‏ ‏ في وجه الزوج والجمهور والقرن التاسع عشر كله وقالت ما يجب أن تقلنه جميعا لا!‏

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Ibsen’s famous A Doll’s House is a landmark in the development of truly independent female heroines, rejecting the patriarchy they were socialised to accept unconditionally. Nora, the main character, fails to make her husband understand that their perception of reality is incompatible as he keeps seeing her as a doll, acting out a pretty life for his pleasure and reputation. In the original version, Nora shows the path to independence by opting for the uncertain future of a life lived alone and Ibsen’s famous A Doll’s House is a landmark in the development of truly independent female heroines, rejecting the patriarchy they were socialised to accept unconditionally. Nora, the main character, fails to make her husband understand that their perception of reality is incompatible as he keeps seeing her as a doll, acting out a pretty life for his pleasure and reputation. In the original version, Nora shows the path to independence by opting for the uncertain future of a life lived alone and independently, but Ibsen was confronted with dominant misogyny and power play when German theatres in 1880 asked for “an alternative ending” (yes!), one in which Nora is emotionally blackmailed into staying with her family for the sake of the children. Curtain falls on that “barbaric act of violence”, as Ibsen himself put it when commenting on the "politically correct" alternative (http://ibsen.nb.no/id/11111794.0), a rewriting of literature to suit a misogynistic society protective of all documentation of the role of women. Well, unfortunately we are watching an all too real alternative ending to a century of increasing women’s rights at the moment as well. Across the world, "alternatives" to freedom of speech, movement, and choice are implemented in “so-called democratic processes”, hijacked by the resurrected mindsets of 19th century white, male, heterosexual, pseudo-Christian figures. Domestic violence, rape culture, law-making against family planning and abortion, the alternatives to women’s rights are scarily real. - Nora, keep walking!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bookdragon Sean

    Imagine what it would be like to live in a doll’s house: it's a house in which you are controlled and have no power to make any strong decisions; it's a house in which you are a play thing for someone else’s entertainment. This sounds a lot like a bad marriage, so it's a house in which your husband holds the purse strings, so to speak, and leaves you with no control over your family’s finances. Indeed, your husband keeps you on a very tight leash. Such is the perceived life of Nora Helma. Yet, t Imagine what it would be like to live in a doll’s house: it's a house in which you are controlled and have no power to make any strong decisions; it's a house in which you are a play thing for someone else’s entertainment. This sounds a lot like a bad marriage, so it's a house in which your husband holds the purse strings, so to speak, and leaves you with no control over your family’s finances. Indeed, your husband keeps you on a very tight leash. Such is the perceived life of Nora Helma. Yet, this work is in favour of women Note the word perceived for that is the appearance Nora gives to the outer world. Indeed, the doll’s house is a metaphor for Nora’s life in which she takes on the role of a doll. Her husband is now in charge and before then her farther. She has no idea who, or what, she is because she has been conditioned by society to behave in the manner of an acceptable wife, which is one that obeys her husband’s wishes. The result is a woman who appears week and controllable, but she has kept a big, big, secret from her husband that challenges everything he thinks her to be. She, this simple minded doll, has managed to borrow money (something unheard of for a women of this time) to keep her family afloat whilst her husband was too ill to work. So yeah, this play is very feminist. Ibsen has used Nora’s situation to comment on the ridiculous nature of marriage in the nineteenth century. The play is rooted in the then rising field of naturalism, which endeavoured to portray life accurately with no idealisations; thus, Nora’s marriage can be seen as an accurate portrayal of what most women had to put up with in their marriages. Ibsen shocked his audinece Moreover, this means that the play was an absolute shocker to the Victorian audience. This is not because of Nora’s disobedience, but the way her marriage has been used as a disguise to hide her freedom. Despite being in a controlling marriage she had managed to be able to borrow money off her own accord, by herself. This indicates that Nora’s role as a housewife was nothing more than a charade because she did, in fact, have some freedom to make her own choices such as the life changing one she makes at the end of the play. Thus, the play was a milestone for questioning the traditional view of marriage; it suggested that marriage was overbearing and controlling, but if one was careful they could gain some freedom from their bigoted spouse; it suggested that marriage appeared like a doll’s house in which the doll was destined to be free.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Dukkehjem = A doll's House, Henrik Ibsen A Doll's House also translated as A Doll House, is a three-act play written by Henrik Ibsen. It premiered at the Royal Theatre in Copenhagen, Denmark, on 21 December 1879, having been published earlier that month. The play is set in a Norwegian town circa 1879. عنوانها: خانه عروسک و اشباح؛ عروسکخانه؛ نویسنده: هنریک ایبسن؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش: ماه آگوست سال 1976 میلادی عنوان: خانه عروسک و اشباح؛ نویسنده: هنریک ایبسن؛ مترجم: مهدی فروغ؛ تهران، بنگاه ترجمه و نشر Dukkehjem = A doll's House, Henrik Ibsen A Doll's House also translated as A Doll House, is a three-act play written by Henrik Ibsen. It premiered at the Royal Theatre in Copenhagen, Denmark, on 21 December 1879, having been published earlier that month. The play is set in a Norwegian town circa 1879. عنوانها: خانه عروسک و اشباح؛ عروسکخانه؛ نویسنده: هنریک ایبسن؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش: ماه آگوست سال 1976 میلادی عنوان: خانه عروسک و اشباح؛ نویسنده: هنریک ایبسن؛ مترجم: مهدی فروغ؛ تهران، بنگاه ترجمه و نشر کتاب، 1339، در 289 ص، موضوع: دو نمایشنامه از نویسندگان نروژی - سده 19 م عنوان: عروسکخانه؛ نویسنده: هنریک ایبسن؛ مترجم: منوچهر انور؛ تهران، کارنامه، 1385، در 310 ص، نمایشنامه نروژی در سه پرده به همراه ایبسن شاعر، و چند اشاره به چالش ترجمه؛ پیشتر از اینها این نمایشنامه با عنوان «خانه عرسک» به همراه نمایشنامه ی «اشباح» ایبسن، دو نمایشنامه در یک جلد، منتشر شده است؛ ا. شربیانی

  5. 5 out of 5

    Helen Ροζουλί Εωσφόρος Vernus Portitor Arcanus Ταμετούρο Αμούν Arnum

    Πεντάστερο. Επειδή κοντά διακόσια χρονια πριν ο Ίψεν μας φανερώνει με το γραπτό του την αυτογνωσία,την ελεύθερη βούληση, την ανεξαρτησία, την ανιδιοτέλεια και την αγάπη, όχι μόνο μέσα απο μια γυναίκα όμορφη και άβουλη σαν κούκλα,μα και μέσα απο την ίδια την ανθρώπινη ύπαρξη. Η Νόρα είναι μια όμορφη νέα γυναίκα σύζυγος και μητέρα η οποία ζει και αγωνίζεται για την ευτυχία -πρωτίστως των άλλων- την οικογενειακή θαλπωρή, την απόλυτη φροντίδα και ικανοποίηση των παιδιών και του συζύγου της. Είναι υπ Πεντάστερο. Επειδή κοντά διακόσια χρονια πριν ο Ίψεν μας φανερώνει με το γραπτό του την αυτογνωσία,την ελεύθερη βούληση, την ανεξαρτησία, την ανιδιοτέλεια και την αγάπη, όχι μόνο μέσα απο μια γυναίκα όμορφη και άβουλη σαν κούκλα,μα και μέσα απο την ίδια την ανθρώπινη ύπαρξη. Η Νόρα είναι μια όμορφη νέα γυναίκα σύζυγος και μητέρα η οποία ζει και αγωνίζεται για την ευτυχία -πρωτίστως των άλλων- την οικογενειακή θαλπωρή, την απόλυτη φροντίδα και ικανοποίηση των παιδιών και του συζύγου της. Είναι υπάκουη,τρυφερή,υπομονετική και άβουλη σαν μικρό παιδί. Ετσι έμαθε να ζει. Πρώτα στα χέρια του μπαμπά της σαν ένα λατρεμένο και ανώριμο πλασματάκι και μετά στα χέρια του συζύγου της σαν μια κούκλα μόνο για την βιτρίνα και για την προσωπική του ικανοποίηση. Τη βαραίνει ένα μεγάλο μυστικό. Ένα ψέμμα που την κατατρέχει χρόνια ολόκληρα το οποίο αναγκάστηκε να πει για να σώσει ότι αγαπούσε. Όταν αυτό αποκαλύπτεται και βλέπει με τρόμο και αηδία τις συνέπειες, ξυπνάει απο το λήθαργο της παραμυθένιας της ζωής και παραιτείται απο την υπόσταση του κουκλόσπιτου της. Ενηλικιώνεται με σκληρό τρόπο και αποφασίζει πως μόνο μια είναι η λύση για να μπορέσει να ανακαλύψει τον εαυτό της και την πραγματική ζωή. Καλή ανάγνωση! Πολλούς ασπασμούς.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    This is the story of a marriage that superficially seems happy, but a critical turn of events reveals a sham relationship. Torvald and Nora Helmer, who've had some financial struggles, are delighted because Torvald has gotten major promotion at the bank where he works. But Nora, behind her lightheartedness and childish behavior - encouraged, always, by Torvald, who calls her diminutive, vaguely (or sometimes explicitly) insulting names names like "my sweet tooth" and "little spendthrift" - is hid This is the story of a marriage that superficially seems happy, but a critical turn of events reveals a sham relationship. Torvald and Nora Helmer, who've had some financial struggles, are delighted because Torvald has gotten major promotion at the bank where he works. But Nora, behind her lightheartedness and childish behavior - encouraged, always, by Torvald, who calls her diminutive, vaguely (or sometimes explicitly) insulting names names like "my sweet tooth" and "little spendthrift" - is hiding a major secret. She borrowed a substantial sum of money a few years ago to finance a trip to Italy to help Torvald recover from a major illness. She told Torvald the money was left to her by her father, but it was actually loaned to her by one Nils Krogstad, and she has been slowly paying it back. But now Nils is threatening to tell Nora's husband ... especially since he realized that Nora forged her father's signature as co-signer of the note. I first read this play many years ago as a college English major, and frankly it didn't leave much of an impression on me at the time. But rereading this now, as a married woman with children, the utter wrongness and superficiality of Torvald's and Nora's relationship hits me hard. Almost everything Torvald says to Nora diminishes her as a person:"Now, now, the little lark's wings mustn't droop. Come on, don't be a sulky squirrel." Nora, in turn, treats her children - especially her daughter - with the same type of carelessness of their value as a person. As the problem of the forged promissory looms closer to disclosure, Nora becomes more frantic. But she still thinks that Torvald, who has shown nothing but disdain for her mind and financial ability, will stand by her and protect her if her misdeed (which was done because of her love and concern for her husband) becomes public. This is one of the earliest feminist works of literature, written in 1879 by Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen. It's hard to believe that this hard-hitting play, about a woman who realizes she's been treated as a mindless doll all her life by her father and then her husband, and what she decides to do about it, was written over 130 years ago. It raises some important questions of true communication and finding yourself, not just for women but for all people. British actress Hattie Morahan, who played Nora, made some comments about it that really struck me:"... the things Ibsen writes mean it ceases to be about a particular milieu and becomes about marriage (or partnership) and money. These are universal anxieties, and it seems from talking to people that it resonates in the most visceral way, especially if they are or have been in a difficult relationship. Someone said to me the other night, 'That's the play that broke my parents' marriage up.' It shines a very harsh light on the messy heart of relationships, and how difficult it can be to be honest with another human being even if you love them."https://www.theguardian.com/stage/201.... I'll admit that the ending leaves me unsettled, with its burning all bridges approach. Although I have some sympathy with German actress Hedwig Niemann-Raabe, who famously refused to perform the play unless Ibsen rewrote the ending, I don't think changing it was the right decision from a literary point of view. As a literary work, the ending is tremendously powerful. However, as a practical guide to life, I'm not convinced that what Nora does is right. (view spoiler)[ She leaves her husband, which I can understand: he's tremendously selfish and has never treated her as anything but a mindless doll. Still, giving him at least a chance to change, once she realizes that they both need that change, would seem like the right thing to do in real life. What bothers me more is Nora also leaving her children and cutting off all communication with them as well, at least until she finds herself as a person. (hide spoiler)] I guess the question for me is, should you hurt innocent people in your quest to go pursue self-fulfillment? Nora, at least, didn't feel like she had a choice, but I wasn't convinced. In any case, this is a very thought-provoking play that's still relevant 137 years after it was written.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Mr. S, let me make myself very clear. I will never, never believe that Ibsen intended for Nora's grabbing of her husband's cloak as she ran out the door to indicate his guilt in her implied suicide. It was Christmas. In Norway. The woman was cold. (This is why I didn't do so well in your class, isn't it, Mr. S?)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Brina

    I read Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House back in high school as required reading but did not grasp the scope of his masterpiece then. Ibsen penned his classic play about the story of Nora and Thorvald Helmer at a time in his life when he was coping with his former love Laura being confined to an insane asylum. In 1872 Laura married a man other than Ibsen and he fell ill with a lethal disease. Their doctors prescribed a southern climate but Laura did not have funds to move her husband to such a clima I read Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House back in high school as required reading but did not grasp the scope of his masterpiece then. Ibsen penned his classic play about the story of Nora and Thorvald Helmer at a time in his life when he was coping with his former love Laura being confined to an insane asylum. In 1872 Laura married a man other than Ibsen and he fell ill with a lethal disease. Their doctors prescribed a southern climate but Laura did not have funds to move her husband to such a climate, so she borrowed the money from a trusting friend. On her return she still did not have the money to cover the loan, so she forged a bank note, which subsequently lead to her entering the asylum. Ibsen started work on A Doll's House shortly after this episode took place. Clearly it is an example of art imitating life as Nora is Laura, Thorvald her husband, et al. What I found the most interesting is Ibsen's view on the place of women in society. He believed that women were not objects who were chained to their husbands with no voice in society. On the contrary I feel he saw women as independent thinkers who were free to make their own decisions rather than the dolls stuck living their lives according to their husbands' wills. We see this with both the characters of Nora and Kristin Linde. I read A Doll's House in less than an hour as the text is less than one hundred pages long. It is what is contained in these pages that packs a punch and why A Doll's House has become timeless. A classic, I recommend to all who haven't read it before.

  9. 5 out of 5

    David

    First things first. Nora, the protagonist of Ibsen's A Doll's House, is a twit. There's no getting around it. We may choose to assign blame for her twittishness to her husband, her milieu, or her era, but this will never adequately mitigate her essential twit nature to that reader or spectator of the play who must endure her self-identification as her husband's 'squirrel' or her childlike idiocy. I myself couldn't stop wondering if Nora is an actual twit (i.e., a twit absolutely, regardless of h First things first. Nora, the protagonist of Ibsen's A Doll's House, is a twit. There's no getting around it. We may choose to assign blame for her twittishness to her husband, her milieu, or her era, but this will never adequately mitigate her essential twit nature to that reader or spectator of the play who must endure her self-identification as her husband's 'squirrel' or her childlike idiocy. I myself couldn't stop wondering if Nora is an actual twit (i.e., a twit absolutely, regardless of her context) or relative twit (i.e., a woman who seems a twit to us now as a result of the changes in custom, gender roles, and society itself). And I haven't of course ruled out a combination of the two. Then my mind became even more scrupulous. Was my judgment that Nora is a twit itself a condition of my entitled position in a (still) phallocentric society? I'm not kidding. I actually thought this. This is what a culture of loudly warring intellectual discourses does to a man. Am I guilty because I think Nora is twit? Well, I abandoned that idea. Now I am convinced that she really is a twit, but now I ascribe some of her twittishness to the artificiality of drama itself, especially at the end of the nineteenth century. I think I've temporarily settled on this opinion. But ask me tomorrow, and who knows? Since I've spent so much time convicting Nora of being a twit, it might seem surprising that I've given this play four stars. But really—there are plenty of fine stories to be told about twits and their ostensible transformations into non-twits. We shouldn't discriminate against twits. Don't they have hopes, dreams, sorrows, disappointments like the rest of us? A Doll's House is the story of a silly, naive Norwegian wife named Nora who is being blackmailed by an unsavory bank clerk; apparently, she forged a document some time before, but the backstory is too contorted and contrived to bother with here. (I'm more than a little annoyed that Ibsen couldn't come up with a more elegant MacGuffin—one that's not entirely reliant upon Nora's [guileless or stupid, as you see it] admission of wrongdoing to her blackmailer.) Nora works overtime to keep her husband Torvald from finding out about her transgression. (Here, a cultural difference comes into play: given the circumstances, it's difficult for a modern audience to imagine that Torvald would be outraged at her confession.) Eventually, he does find out though and rips Nora a proverbial new one. This leads up to a famous and infamous confrontation between husband and wife punctuated by Nora's door slam heard 'round the world. It's a fascinating and prescient play, no doubt, but it's also more than a little creaky—at least in translation. The conclusion, I think, retains much of its provocation today, well over a hundred years later. It is very difficult to watch or read the play and not react to Nora. She will always be subject to moral condemnation, but she's intriguing—even in her twittishness—because she isn't entirely right or wrong... She's just human. In an often infuriating way.

  10. 4 out of 5

    stephanie

    oh, nora. you are much maligned, and yet. i wonder why people find you so much more annoying than emma bovary, etc. i think there's so much about this play as a historical document that i appreciate and enjoy and love that sometimes i forget it's supposed to be a PLAY. that said, i don't think nora was *supposed* to be entirely sympathetic. i think her annoying behaviors are supposed to get on your nerves - but somewhere, i think, Ibsen hoped that you would see the way she acts is not simply who oh, nora. you are much maligned, and yet. i wonder why people find you so much more annoying than emma bovary, etc. i think there's so much about this play as a historical document that i appreciate and enjoy and love that sometimes i forget it's supposed to be a PLAY. that said, i don't think nora was *supposed* to be entirely sympathetic. i think her annoying behaviors are supposed to get on your nerves - but somewhere, i think, Ibsen hoped that you would see the way she acts is not simply who she is, but because of how she is brought up, the situation she is in, the situation women are in, the realities of life for a woman in that time. fascinating, in general, and a true testament to Ibsen that this is even being discussed today. i kind of adore this play, and not because i am a "feminist".

  11. 5 out of 5

    Carlie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I did not like this book because the main character got on my last nerves. A supposedly intelligent woman pretending to be an idiot to fit her husband's idea of what women are like? And in the end abandons her family. I have no sympathy for characters who punish the innocent children of their idiotic patnerships in order to "find themselves". Then again, I read this in high school so perhaps if I reread it I'll see what all the hoopla surrounding it is about. No wonder people hate feminists! If t I did not like this book because the main character got on my last nerves. A supposedly intelligent woman pretending to be an idiot to fit her husband's idea of what women are like? And in the end abandons her family. I have no sympathy for characters who punish the innocent children of their idiotic patnerships in order to "find themselves". Then again, I read this in high school so perhaps if I reread it I'll see what all the hoopla surrounding it is about. No wonder people hate feminists! If this is what passes for feminist fare, then I don't want to be one anymore. Women don't have to abandon their children to free themselves from this patriarchal society. It only makes you look like a bad selfish mother. A real feminist would not marry an idiot for money not love and produce offspring with him only to scar them for life later by abandoning them.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Duane

    Ibsen claimed he wasn't denouncing 19th century marriage norms with this play, he was just "describing humanity". I take that to mean he thinks these kinds of things, like wives leaving their husbands, happened everyday. In fact they probably did, or even worse, especially in literature, if Tolstoy's Anna or Flaubert's Emma can be used as examples. Whatever Ibsen's intent, the play had an impact, and it's success has helped solidify his position as one of the worlds best playwrights.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Laura لاورا

    Bambola sì, ma non troppo Un testo teatrale molto interessante, questo del norvegese Henrik Ibsen, considerato sin dalla fine dell'Ottocento – la sua pubblicazione risale ormai al lontano 1879 – a favore della causa femminista. In realtà, Nora Helmer, protagonista dell'opera, nonché rispettabile signora di buona famiglia borghese, non sembra affannarsi troppo dietro aspirazioni da donna emancipata e padrona di se stessa, come ha messo in luce la critica più autorevole. Già dalle prime battute, l'i Bambola sì, ma non troppo Un testo teatrale molto interessante, questo del norvegese Henrik Ibsen, considerato sin dalla fine dell'Ottocento – la sua pubblicazione risale ormai al lontano 1879 – a favore della causa femminista. In realtà, Nora Helmer, protagonista dell'opera, nonché rispettabile signora di buona famiglia borghese, non sembra affannarsi troppo dietro aspirazioni da donna emancipata e padrona di se stessa, come ha messo in luce la critica più autorevole. Già dalle prime battute, l'immagine che di lei si percepisce è quella di una persona particolarmente preoccupata (e in un certo qual modo ossessionata) per il lusso e il sempre apprezzato vil denaro, una moglie che esulta per l'imminente prospettiva di ben più cospicui guadagni da parte del marito, fresco di nomina di direttore di banca, facendosene addirittura vanto con chi conosce. “Già a capodanno entrerà nella Banca e avrà un lauto stipendio. Da oggi possiamo vivere molto diversamente... proprio come vogliamo. Cara Kristine, come mi sento felice! È davvero una gran bella cosa avere molti quattrini ed essere senza preoccupazioni.” A prima vista, una signora alquanto frivola e insulsa che non lascia di sé un'impressione positiva per buona parte dell'opera, così come insulsa, in verità, appare anche la figura del consorte, Torvald, che, con tutta evidenza, non le risparmia un trattamento da giocattolino sensuale e mero oggetto di proprietà consacrato dalla sacra morale del matrimonio borghese né vezzeggiativi (“lodoletta”, “scoiattolo” e altri di gusto discutibile) che la dicono lunga sulla sua considerazione del quoziente intellettivo di una moglie che – parole sue – “consuma mucchi di quattrini”. Pian piano, tuttavia, viene a galla l'illecito di cui la rispettabile signora si è macchiata e, soprattutto, il motivo a cui è imputabile tanta sventatezza. E allora s'inizia a intuire che la stessa donnetta frivola e insulsa è pronta a rischiare per il marito molto più di quanto quest'ultimo, preoccupato soltanto di salvare la faccia e la propria miserabile rispettabilità, sia disposto a fare per lei come si scoprirà tristemente alla fine. Ma è nelle ultimissime pagine che Nora si riscatta pienamente agli occhi del lettore, trasformandosi da bambola, ruolo che in fondo non le era poi così dispiaciuto interpretare, in “creatura umana” pensante e riversando pacatamente su un sempre più inebetito Torvald discorsi più esplosivi di una bomba. Torvald: Lasciare la tua casa, tuo marito e i tuoi figli! Pensa: che cosa dirà la gente? Nora: Questo non può riguardarmi. So soltanto che per me è necessario. Torvald: È rivoltante. Così ti sottrai ai tuoi doveri più sacri? Nora: Quali sarebbero secondo te i miei doveri più sacri? Torvald: Devo dirtelo io? Non sono i doveri verso tuo marito e verso le tue creature? Nora: Ho altri doveri che sono altrettanto sacri. Torvald: Non è vero. Che doveri potrebbero essere? Nora: I doveri verso me stessa. Torvald: In primo luogo sei moglie e madre. Nora: Non lo credo più. Credo d'essere prima di tutto una creatura umana al pari di te... o almeno voglio tentare di diventarlo. So bene, Torvald, che il mondo darà ragione a te e che qualcosa di simile si legge nei libri. Ma ciò che dice il mondo e ciò che si legge nei libri non può più essere norma per me. Io stessa devo riflettere per vederci chiaro nelle cose. Torvald: Possibile che tu non ci veda chiaro nella tua posizione, nella tua famiglia? Non hai in queste cose una guida infallibile? Non hai la religione? Nora: Oh, Torvald, non so neanche esattamente che cosa sia la religione. La signora Helmer, infine, rinuncia alla sua casa di bambola, dove lascia una fittizia felicità coniugale, marito e figli piccoli, poiché colui che riteneva il proprio compagno di vita, e invece non è altro che un estraneo, alla prova dei fatti non si dimostra abbastanza uomo, abbastanza protettivo, abbastanza rassicurante né, ancor meno, si offe d'immolarsi per lei. Non importa se Nora non incarna il femminismo che, a torto, si è visto in questa importante pagina del teatro ibseniano; è comunque una donna che dà prova di coraggio, coerenza, dignità e questo è sufficiente a consacrarla al pantheon dei personaggi più emblematici e degni di ricordo della grande letteratura senza tempo.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lyn

    A Doll’s House by Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen is alike with Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises in that it may more often than not be misinterpreted. First published in 1879, the play tells the story of Nora Helmer and her marriage to Torvald Helmer. But the play also depicts two other female characters and between the three Ibsen has composed a female triumvirate of the European nineteenth century Everywoman. Along with Nora are Kristine and Anne Marie, who Ibsen has displayed as a fema A Doll’s House by Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen is alike with Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises in that it may more often than not be misinterpreted. First published in 1879, the play tells the story of Nora Helmer and her marriage to Torvald Helmer. But the play also depicts two other female characters and between the three Ibsen has composed a female triumvirate of the European nineteenth century Everywoman. Along with Nora are Kristine and Anne Marie, who Ibsen has displayed as a female image of subservience, disadvantage and obliging self-sacrifice. But Ibsen’s caricature of Victorian dysfunction does not end with feminism; the male characters are wooden and enslaved to self-deprecating attitudes and behaviors that perpetuate the failures of society and contaminate an already poisonous culture. Most compelling, though, was reading this from the vantage of the twenty-first century. Some ultra-conservatives might share the nineteenth century interpretation of the play (Ibsen was castigated into amending the ending and later regretted the cave-in) but others may fail to see the consequences of the socio-economic results of a feminist movement (of which Ibsen as a modernist was in the far forward vanguard) that has played its part in changing, some for the better and some for the worse, Western civilization. Without a doubt an important drama on the world stage.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Shaindel

    I read this in college (of course) and didn't "get it" until I taught it a few years ago when I took over an Introduction to Drama as Literature course for another instructor. Wow, Ibsen understood how stifling marriage was for women in this era and how hypocritical men were. I would go into more detail but don't want to drop a "spoiler." A must-read, a classic, but I don't know at what age most readers will get it. This is why I think you should be required to have the practice marriage that do I read this in college (of course) and didn't "get it" until I taught it a few years ago when I took over an Introduction to Drama as Literature course for another instructor. Wow, Ibsen understood how stifling marriage was for women in this era and how hypocritical men were. I would go into more detail but don't want to drop a "spoiler." A must-read, a classic, but I don't know at what age most readers will get it. This is why I think you should be required to have the practice marriage that doesn't work--so you can understand literature.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Helga

    “It is so marvelous to live and be happy.” I have a confession to make. I always thought A Doll’s House was a children’s story. How wrong was I! So much to learn…so much to learn… A Doll’s House is a controversial three-act play about the self-discovery of one woman who goes against conventions and rules of a man-made society. Nora is a married woman, who does everything to make her husband and children happy and content. She is supposed to dress up and look pretty. She is referred to by her husba “It is so marvelous to live and be happy.” I have a confession to make. I always thought A Doll’s House was a children’s story. How wrong was I! So much to learn…so much to learn… A Doll’s House is a controversial three-act play about the self-discovery of one woman who goes against conventions and rules of a man-made society. Nora is a married woman, who does everything to make her husband and children happy and content. She is supposed to dress up and look pretty. She is referred to by her husband as “my little” this and that. She is the Doll. She has been the Doll in her father’s house and has merely changed one Doll House for another. But Nora has a secret. She has borrowed money from a dubious individual to help pay for improving her husband’s health. She has been economizing and saving money to pay back the debt while being called spendthrift and reckless by her husband. When the secret is disclosed, instead of thanking her, her husband becomes a self-righteous prig and calls her a hypocrite, a liar and a miserable creature and declares her not to be fit to bring up their children. Nora then awakens and makes a decision that changes everything. And her new life begins with the slamming of a door.

  17. 4 out of 5

    FeReSHte

    از بهترین هایی بود که خوندم..داستان پرکشش با شخصیت های کار شده و دوست داشتنی و پیام های پنهان و سوالاتی که مکررا در ذهن ایجاد می کرد و امان از پرده سوم ماجرا نمایشنامه خانه عروسک از زمان انتشارش، انتقادات زیادی رو برای خودش به ارمغان آورد. ایبسن با این نمایشنامه پیام هایی رو به خواننده منتقل می کنه که تاب آوردنش برای سال 1879 قابل تصور نیست. نورا و هلمر با دو بچه زندگی عاشقانه ای رو می گذرونند. هلمر ظاهرا عاشق نوراست ولی نه ما و نه حتی خود نورا نمی دونیم واکنش مرد داستان بعد از برملا شدن راز نورا از بهترین هایی بود که خوندم..داستان پرکشش با شخصیت های کار شده و دوست داشتنی و پیام های پنهان و سوالاتی که مکررا در ذهن ایجاد می کرد و امان از پرده سوم ماجرا نمایشنامه خانه عروسک از زمان انتشارش، انتقادات زیادی رو برای خودش به ارمغان آورد. ایبسن با این نمایشنامه پیام هایی رو به خواننده منتقل می کنه که تاب آوردنش برای سال 1879 قابل تصور نیست. نورا و هلمر با دو بچه زندگی عاشقانه ای رو می گذرونند. هلمر ظاهرا عاشق نوراست ولی نه ما و نه حتی خود نورا نمی دونیم واکنش مرد داستان بعد از برملا شدن راز نورا چه خواهد بود؟ این راز کار فداکارانه ولی غیرقانونیه که نورا به خاطر حفظ زندگی و سلامتی همسرش انجام داده که در درون بهش مفتخره حتی اگر جامعه این کار رو نادرست بدونه ایبسن با نقد نقش زن و شوهری در یک زندگی زناشویی اروپایی قرن نوزدهمی، آگاهی ای رو به مردم انتقال داد که تا قبل اون کمتر کسی جرات بیانش رو پیدا کرده بود. ایبسن معتقد بود " یک زن در دنیای مدرن امروزی نمی تونه خودش باشه چرا که دنیای امروز رو مردان هدایت و قضاوت می کنند و بر پایه قوانینی سراسر مردانه بنا شده، قوانینی که کمترین سنخیتی با درون زنان ندارند" گاهی فکر می کردم میشه داستان رو از حالت فمینیستی خارج کرد و بهش دیدگاهی "انسانی" داد...تصمیم درست چیه؟ تصمیمی مطابق قانون یا تصمیمی برخاسته از دل براساس بشردوستی و انسان دوستی درون؟ چون گاها طی خوندن این نماشنامه به یاد سوالاتی می افتادم که با خوندن "جنایت و مکافات" داستایوسکی در ذهنم ایجاد میشد به راحتی می تونستم به جای این که نورا رو در قالب یک "زن" ببینم اون رو در نقش یک "انسان" ببینم و به این بحث های فمینیستی خاتمه بدم خانه عروسک نامیست که نورا انتخاب کرده . به عقیده نورا هم پدر، قبل از ازدواج و هم شوهر، بعد از ازدواج اون رو عاشقانه دوست داشتند ولی این عشق تا زمانی تضمینی بود که نورا هم مثل عروسکی گوش به فرمان خواسته ها و انتظارات این دو مرد مهم زندگیش باشه بد نیست بدونیم که ایده اولیه نمایشنامه از زندگی "لورا کیلر" یکی از دوستان صمیمی هنریک ایبسن گرفته شده....زنی که در عالم واقعیت رازی داشت که بهش مفتخر بود ولی نه جامعه و نه خانواده ش تاییدش نکردند حتی اگر برای حفظ سلامتی همسرش دست به انجامش زده باشه

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mariel

    Helmer: Just think how a guilty man like that has to lie and play the hypocrite with every one, how he has to wear a mask in the presence of those near and dear to him, even before his own wife and children. And about the children- that is the most terrible part of it all, Nora. Nora: How? Helmer: Because such an atmosphere of lies infects and poisons the whole life of a home. Each breath the children take in such a house is full of the germs of evil. Nora (coming nearer him): Are you sure of that Helmer: Just think how a guilty man like that has to lie and play the hypocrite with every one, how he has to wear a mask in the presence of those near and dear to him, even before his own wife and children. And about the children- that is the most terrible part of it all, Nora. Nora: How? Helmer: Because such an atmosphere of lies infects and poisons the whole life of a home. Each breath the children take in such a house is full of the germs of evil. Nora (coming nearer him): Are you sure of that? Helmer: My dear, I have often seen it in the course of my life as a lawyer. Almost everyone who has gone to the bad early in life has had a deceitful mother. Nora: Why do you only say-- mother? I wanted to see Nora dance her Tarantella. I can see her husband correcting her steps, a dark Geppeto holding the strings. Curtain closed before she can hear the applause, or search for understanding eyes in the audience. How did she feel when she was put on the shelf again, only sure to be taken down again when he remembered to want her. I didn't need anything but the way he talks about Nora to someone else as if she wasn't in the room. I could hear his bitchy inner junior high school girl complaining to Nora about the woman he had been talking to before his two faced nature has had the chance to show itself. Those cookies are bad for your teeth. Where is my cute little dog. I think that the way to understand another person is through understanding yourself. Nora comes to understand that she has never understood anything. Before her husband Helmer there was her father. If we are to know him through Helmer he was a disreputable sort of person. I could see him petting Nora and teaching her to not want anything that matters. Helmer likes to think a lot about himself. I had a sense of him (mind not based on many interactions, although I'm positive they were enough) that he has morals to look good with his nice suit. Helmer would always dress well. Nora has to employ her imagination on how to look good with nothing to go on. She has slowly been paying back a fraudulent loan. The chips are called in A Doll's House when the weight is finally lifted from her shoulders. Helmer has the bank manager's position. Good for him. I can see his smug face with or without an actor to fill his bloated head. Nora is in the same sucky boat as a lot of people in the past few years. Loans given out to people who cannot afford to pay them back, let alone their interest rates. I'm not sure how she managed. It must have taken more energy than she realized until it was over to keep the game going. Smile for your husband. Be a sexy little kitten. Don't enjoy it too much. Sitcoms weren't invented yet when this was published (1897) or perhaps those pristine wives might have proven inspiring role models. I think that Nora let go of her illusions of dancing for a good cause when Helmer rejects her when he learns of her crimes. Accepting blackmail from the loaner is among them. I felt for her trying to hold onto the illusion a little longer, dancing a little longer. More than that I wanted her to get it over with already. Nora makes her speech to her husband about a life lived without choice. She's going to run away. No, I won't see you or the children ever again. It's a childish speech, made from a voice unused to speaking. It's hurt and it doesn't have words for anyone else. See, she plans to run away to her friend Christine first (the same Christine she didn't take the time to send a letter to when her friend's husband had died). Then her home village (bad idea. Everyone will know she left her husband) and then everything will fall into place. At least she will make her own choices. I hear that, but she doesn't ask Christine if this is okay. How adult is it to acknowledge you let two men live for you only to burden someone else with your troubles? Was there nowhere in her heart that didn't hope Christine would have her answers? Teach me how to live? I can believe it. It does make me wonder how far her words are going to carry. They are on wobbly Bambi legs. Her freedom from social scandal and likely jail is because Christine happened to have once been loved by the banker blackguard. Well, what about the doctor friend in love with Nora? He leaves his card that he is going off to die all alone. Maybe Nora knew he was in love with her and maybe she didn't. To her credit she didn't take money from him and solve the Helmer doom. Maybe all she wanted was for her life to not have been a lie. Why did it take Nora this long? She closed her eyes and danced? A childish hope or was it parts the callous voice that thought it for the best her friend go off to die by himself without a kind word for him. Don't trouble me with it, I don't want to hear it, this house is my own. I wonder what will happen to her on her own. I don't believe Christine isn't going to help her again. Christine walked into that house and asked Nora to ask all of those questions. She didn't have to see much of it. If Nora's world was as small as a doll's house maybe some of it was because she didn't take her experiences and push them back until they were bigger. She doesn't know anyone, let alone herself. I can't eat what cookies I want. She snuck them into her pocket and ate them on the sly. She should have eaten them in the open. But she didn't want to look into the audience and see something else. I wish I could see what happens to her when she goes into the world and it isn't a smiling audience. Then she'll be a real person. I read this/saw a televised version in high school drama class (I suspect this may be the case for others?). I remember that I wasn't too taken in by it. I don't think that I liked the actors too much. What I would like is an actress who could show when Nora hopes that Helmer is going to believe in her. This is why she stayed with him. It was a refusal to accept that she hadn't been living this way her whole life. She babies herself too. It isn't only Helmer who belittles her. That she took out that loan, forged her deceased father's name for it, and frittered away a small fortune on an Italian vacation to "save" her ill husband's life speaks to me the same as the young woman who blew money she didn't have. She reminds me of young women I know who go on massive credit card sprees on clothes and they can never afford it. It's digging a hole. If she wanted to dig a hole, and wanted Helmer to stick up for her anyway, her I want to choose for myself speech feels a bit of a lie. It's a bit temper tantrum-y. She runs away to Christine. I don't know. I want to feel this is a feminist play because there were (still are) many trapped under another person without the will or courage to break out. Maybe Nora was one of those people. Anyway, I hadn't meant to reread this initially. The Recognitions and Woodcutters got me curious about Ibsen again. I had this in my huge box of plays so that's how it happened. It's interesting to go back and compare how young me felt to how older me feels. Fourteen year old Mariel holds out sometimes. That's a relief, really. I read Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird between classes. Simply couldn't put it down. That is still one of the best feelings I've ever known. To get so lost in something, to believe in fictional people so much. I'm really happy that I'm thirty-three and never lost it. Nora is real to me only... I feel like I got the lay of the land and there's a part of her that she doesn't know so I can't know it? It's a play, though, so maybe I'm missing the part that a person shows and they don't know they are showing it. What did she look like when she was performing? What was she trying to get (other than money to pay off that stupid loan). Did she ever love anyone without thinking about how much they loved her?

  19. 5 out of 5

    Scarlet Cameo

    English review at the bottom El idilico retrato de un matrimonio del siglo XIX es el escenario de esta obra que lleva a la relflexión del papel del hombre y la mujer en la sociedad. En una relación común para la época tenemos a Nora, una sumisa, compaciente y perfecta esposa, que acata cada capricho de Torvaldo, el recto, sabio y proveedor esposo, esté último tiene un sentido de la moral, la responsabilidad y el orgullo que(hoy día) podríamos considerar chocante aunque en 1879 era el común. Pero, English review at the bottom El idilico retrato de un matrimonio del siglo XIX es el escenario de esta obra que lleva a la relflexión del papel del hombre y la mujer en la sociedad. En una relación común para la época tenemos a Nora, una sumisa, compaciente y perfecta esposa, que acata cada capricho de Torvaldo, el recto, sabio y proveedor esposo, esté último tiene un sentido de la moral, la responsabilidad y el orgullo que(hoy día) podríamos considerar chocante aunque en 1879 era el común. Pero, en este retrato ¿Qué sucede cuando Torvalo descubre que su maravillosa esposa no es tan perfecta como siempre lo ha creido? ¿Puede perdonarle el ser sólo humana? La relación entre ambos es odiosa, si bien se puede señalar a Nora como una mujer tonta y débil difiero de esa opinión, es una mujer que actúa como se espera que sea no como es realmente; mientras que Torvaldo es marcado como un imbecil que funge el papel de esposo y padre (de hecho esto último es recalcado en repetidas ocasiones por parte del matrimonio), lo cual tampoco es del todo correcto, sí bien él no es para nada de mi agrado ¿debo juzgarlo en base a la percepción de la realidad actual y no de la de su época? No debo (aunque por dentro lo hago) y por tanto no puedo señalarlo como un hombre tonto y machista. La premisa de la historia puede ser simple pero el desarrollo de la misma muestra un crecimiento impresionante en Nora quien, tras ocho años de esconder un "terrible"(?) secreto se ve entre Escila y Caribdis, y ella, al sacar el gato de la bolsa, dolorosamente dislumbra la realidad de su vida. De hecho esta situación lleva a que todos los personajes demuestren su verdadera naturaleza fuera de esa imagen de rectitud demostrada ante la sociedad. La escena final está rodeada de polémica y, pasado más de un siglo, en muchos aspectos estamos igual. Nora es señalada y estigmatizada por sus decisiones y, el otro culpable, es completamente ignorado o justificado en cierto modo. Con un mensaje que dependiendo del lector puede ser positivo o negativo y una metáfora que inequivocamente todos entendemos la lectura es placida y desesperante, una dicotomía que pocas veces funciona pero que aquí lo logra perfectamente. ___________________________________________________ The idyllic portrait of a marriage nineteenth century is the setting for this work that leads to reflection of the role of men and women in society. In a common relationship for the time we have to Nora, a submissive, compaciente and perfect wife who obeys every whim of Torvald, rectum, wise and husband supplier, the latter has a sense of morality, responsibility and pride ( today) we might consider shocking but in 1879 it was the common. But in this picture, what happens when Torvalo discovers that his wonderful wife is not as perfect as he has always believed? You can forgive the only human being? The relationship between the two is odious, but may point to Nora like a fool and weak woman differ from that opinion, is a woman who acts as expected is not as it really is; while Torvald is marked as a jerk who acts the role of husband and father (in fact the latter is stressed repeatedly by marriage), which is not entirely correct, although it is not at all to my liking should I judge him based on the perception of the current reality and not of its time? I should not (although inside I do) and therefore I can not identify it as a fool and macho man. The premise of the story may be simple but the development of it shows an impressive growth in Nora who, after eight years of hiding a "terrible" (?) secret is found between Scylla and Charybdis, and she, to get out the cat bag, painfully saw the reality of his life. In fact, this situation leads to all the characters to show their true nature beyond the image of rectitude demonstrated to society. The final scene is surrounded by controversy and more than a century later, in many ways, we are at the same point. Nora is singled out and stigmatized by their decisions and the other guilty, is completely ignored or justified in a way. With a message depending on the reader can be positive or negative and a metaphor that unequivocally all understand reading is placid and exasperating, a dichotomy that rarely works but here it succeeds perfectly.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Banks

    SUCH an important book (or play, if we're being precise). I love Ibsen's plays, not least for their disarming honesty and commentary on human nature (I'm a particular sucker for The Master Builder!) - and A Doll's House is an extraordinary feat of achievement, given that it was written in the late 19th century... and we all know how women were perceived back then... Nora's triumphant break-through, from vacuous housewife to fierce, independent woman, is a joy to read; not least because it was al SUCH an important book (or play, if we're being precise). I love Ibsen's plays, not least for their disarming honesty and commentary on human nature (I'm a particular sucker for The Master Builder!) - and A Doll's House is an extraordinary feat of achievement, given that it was written in the late 19th century... and we all know how women were perceived back then... Nora's triumphant break-through, from vacuous housewife to fierce, independent woman, is a joy to read; not least because it was also written by a man who clearly sympathised with females of the era, and didn't like the fact that they were treated as mindless property belonging to their husbands. Having said that, Ibsen himself would argue he was merely commenting on the rights of all humans to be true to themselves, not just women. He remains one of my favourite playwrights - if you haven't read / watched A Doll's House, you must!

  21. 5 out of 5

    حماس

    بيت الدمية من الدمية؟؟ إن الدمية هى تلك الفتاة عاشت أولًا مع أبيها فلم تسمع سوى أفكاره وآراءه وتخاف أن تقول له رأيًا مختلفًا فاكتسبت كل آرائه ومعتقداته ثم انتقلت لبيت زوجها فلم يختلف الأمر كثيرًا عن كونها تابعة له عاملها معاملة حسنة طوال 8 سنوات لكنهما لم يحاولا فهم بعضهما قط وهكذا فإن بطلة المسرحية تشعر وكأنها دمية لا هدف منها إلا تسلية أبيها ثم زوجها حتى أطفالها لا تربيهم بقدر ما تربيهم المربية فما القصة؟ القصة أن فتاتنا قررت أن يكون لها شأن أن لا يعدو وجودها فى الحياة كوجود دمية فاستغلت فرصة كان زوجها مريضًا بيت الدمية من الدمية؟؟ إن الدمية هى تلك الفتاة عاشت أولًا مع أبيها فلم تسمع سوى أفكاره وآراءه وتخاف أن تقول له رأيًا مختلفًا فاكتسبت كل آرائه ومعتقداته ثم انتقلت لبيت زوجها فلم يختلف الأمر كثيرًا عن كونها تابعة له عاملها معاملة حسنة طوال 8 سنوات لكنهما لم يحاولا فهم بعضهما قط وهكذا فإن بطلة المسرحية تشعر وكأنها دمية لا هدف منها إلا تسلية أبيها ثم زوجها حتى أطفالها لا تربيهم بقدر ما تربيهم المربية فما القصة؟ القصة أن فتاتنا قررت أن يكون لها شأن أن لا يعدو وجودها فى الحياة كوجود دمية فاستغلت فرصة كان زوجها مريضًا وقامت باستدانة مالٍ لعلاجه ولم تعلمه بذلك فعلت ذلك بنية حسنة ولكن خانها التقدير إذ زورت فى الكمبيالة التى وقّعت عليها علم زوجها بالحادثة فثار وسبّ وأرغى وأزبد وبعد زوال الخطر.. عاد لهدوئه وسامحها لكنها كانت تتوقع منه أن يتحمل هو تبعة أخطائها لم تكن لتسمح بذلك طبعًا فقط تمنت لو عرض عليها الأمر فقط تمنت لو رأت صدقًا مدى حبه لها فحبطت وخاب أملها وقررت الرحيل هاجرة زوجها وأطفالها حتى تجد نفسها وترحل فتاتنا.. _________ لا بد أنها أخطأت فى رحيلها بهذه الصورة لكن يبقى السؤال: هل جنت عليها ثقافة مجتمعها؟ أم هى التى هولت الأمر؟؟ هنريك ابسن كاتب نرويجى رائد المسرح الوقعى الحديث وتشكل مسرحياته ضجة كبيرة على المستوى الاجتماعى كما يتميز بالمغالاة فى وصف الشعور الاجتماعى تحوى مقدمة الكتاب ترجمة موجزه له تأثر به إلى حد بعيد برنارد شو حتى أنه يُسمى ابسن الإنجليز

  22. 4 out of 5

    Shriya

    You'll ask me, "Why five stars?" I'll answer, "Why not?" even though I felt like docking off one at first. Well, the reason is Nora and the last few dialogues of the play and probably my obsession with feminism (thanks to Ms. Atwood!) The play overwhelmed me so much that I am now ready to disagree with anyone who has anything to say against Nora and hit all those who call Ibsen a destroyer of domestic felicity. All I have to say is if you want to know why they call Ibsen "the father of pro You'll ask me, "Why five stars?" I'll answer, "Why not?" even though I felt like docking off one at first. Well, the reason is Nora and the last few dialogues of the play and probably my obsession with feminism (thanks to Ms. Atwood!) The play overwhelmed me so much that I am now ready to disagree with anyone who has anything to say against Nora and hit all those who call Ibsen a destroyer of domestic felicity. All I have to say is if you want to know why they call Ibsen "the father of prose drama", read 'A Doll's House'. If you want to know whether a man can also be a feminist, read 'A Doll's House'. For knowing what women are, what they can be and mainly to understand that just like men, women, too, are primarily human beings whose sacred duties include not only husband, hearth and home but also their own opinions, read 'A Doll's House'. True, the play isn't about what an ideal wife should be like but it certainly is about wives being more than dolls.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hend

    Nora a woman who comes to understand that her marriage wasnt as she supposed it to be , an illusion, and that her husband is a very different person from she once believed him to be..when he cant undergo one of the hardships in their life for her sake .... She leaves her husband and her children because she feels it is for their benefit.. her husband accused her of being a "child-wife"she feels that he was right, that she is a child who knows nothing of the world. Since she knows so little about Nora a woman who comes to understand that her marriage wasnt as she supposed it to be , an illusion, and that her husband is a very different person from she once believed him to be..when he cant undergo one of the hardships in their life for her sake .... She leaves her husband and her children because she feels it is for their benefit.. her husband accused her of being a "child-wife"she feels that he was right, that she is a child who knows nothing of the world. Since she knows so little about herself or society, she feels that she is an inadequate mother and wife..... her last words was that they could become a man and wife once again, but only if a miracle occurred....... i liked the last scene....

  24. 5 out of 5

    Piyangie

    This is a brilliant play by Henrik Ibsen which is also my first introduction to the author. The play mainly revolves around the theme of a woman's place in society as opposed to the woman's right of independence and individuality. Nora Helmer, the main protagonist, has a secret to conceal from her conservative husband. This secret is a cause of action that has been taken by her which is although partly a crime, has been done in good faith and to the advantage of her family at a difficult time. Ho This is a brilliant play by Henrik Ibsen which is also my first introduction to the author. The play mainly revolves around the theme of a woman's place in society as opposed to the woman's right of independence and individuality. Nora Helmer, the main protagonist, has a secret to conceal from her conservative husband. This secret is a cause of action that has been taken by her which is although partly a crime, has been done in good faith and to the advantage of her family at a difficult time. However, when the secret comes out in open, the consequences that follow show the women's position, their vulnerability and men's perception of women in the patriarchal society they live in. This play, to me, is Ibsen's voice which is raised to the world to say that it is time that women are to be looked as individuals, as humans with feelings, and as an important part of a society, especially in a family; it is time that they should be respected as equals; and that they should not be viewed mere possessions to keep and treat as the men fancy. Such a perception on women coming from a man of his era is praiseworthy. It is also a bold venture to write and stage such a play in a conservative society where it is decidedly being viewed as scandalous. Bravo to Ibsen for his brave effort in bringing out the "women voice".

  25. 4 out of 5

    emma

    3.25/5 i respect this play for how badass it was for its time, and i think everyone should read it at some point or another. (it has a lot to say about nineteenth century female oppression/gender roles/etc.) but the execution can be grating and come off as unrealistic, and ibsen's idea of men and women having separate, gendered moral compasses doesn't fully sit well with me. (he thought of western law being male, and it's unfair for women to have to live like men. sweeping generalizations about g 3.25/5 i respect this play for how badass it was for its time, and i think everyone should read it at some point or another. (it has a lot to say about nineteenth century female oppression/gender roles/etc.) but the execution can be grating and come off as unrealistic, and ibsen's idea of men and women having separate, gendered moral compasses doesn't fully sit well with me. (he thought of western law being male, and it's unfair for women to have to live like men. sweeping generalizations about genders aren't my fave.) all the same, this play has done more good than bad. bottom line: this is a definitely-read-in-your-lifetime book. and it's short and a play and easy to read. so in some ways i recommend!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Ebaid

    مرت سنتان تقريبا منذ قرأت هذه المسرحية لأول مرة. أنهيتها كاملة وأنا جالس بكافيتيريا ملحقة ببنزينة في أحد ضواحي المدينة، ولم يكن لدي الكثير لأقوله حينها، أما الآن فلدي الكثير لأحكيه لكم. *** في لحظة تهور خاطفة معتمدا على ما بيننا من عشم، سألتها عما تعتقده في زميلتنا التي ستتزوج قريبا. "هل ستكمل عملها بعد الزواج؟". تفرست ببطيء في ملامحي لمحاولة تبين إن كنت أمزح أو أنني سأكمل بما يجعل حديثي مفهوما، ثم زفرت يائسة من محاولة فهمي. "وهي هتحتاج تشتغل ليه يا بني، ما هي هتتجوز خلاص! ايه؟". ايه؟ بماذا أجيبها مرت سنتان تقريبا منذ قرأت هذه المسرحية لأول مرة. أنهيتها كاملة وأنا جالس بكافيتيريا ملحقة ببنزينة في أحد ضواحي المدينة، ولم يكن لدي الكثير لأقوله حينها، أما الآن فلدي الكثير لأحكيه لكم. *** في لحظة تهور خاطفة معتمدا على ما بيننا من عشم، سألتها عما تعتقده في زميلتنا التي ستتزوج قريبا. "هل ستكمل عملها بعد الزواج؟". تفرست ببطيء في ملامحي لمحاولة تبين إن كنت أمزح أو أنني سأكمل بما يجعل حديثي مفهوما، ثم زفرت يائسة من محاولة فهمي. "وهي هتحتاج تشتغل ليه يا بني، ما هي هتتجوز خلاص! ايه؟". ايه؟ بماذا أجيبها الآن؟ انها ورطة لم يخرجني منها سوى أنه طيبة ولا تلقي بالا لما لا تفهمه في هذا العالم كما صرحت لي قبلا. بالي لا يهنأ للأسف دونما إجابات مرضية. ماذا تريد فتيات بلادي من هذا العالم؟. لقد راقبت فتيان كثيرون عن كثب وغالبا ما كنت أجدهم ذوي أهداف محددة وطرق واضحة لبلوغها، أهدافهم سحطية ومتناقضة ربما،لفكنه يظل طريقهم الذي اختاروه. أما الفتيات فالتفتيش عن دوافعهم وسلوكهم فلم يكن يصل بي سوى للضياع وسط بحار التصرفات الغير مترابطة لديهن. لحسن الحظ أنني لست الوحيد الذي ارهق نفسه بالتفكير بهكذا أشياء. لحسن الحظ لدينا نظرية الدمية لتفسير إناث مجتمعاتنا الذكورية، فالفتيات لسن ذوات إردات حرة، وإنما هن كالدمى يحركهن مجموعة من الأوامر والسلطات الأبوية. الدمية على المسرح تكون تحت تحكم لاعب واحد، ولكن الأنثى هنا دمية يتحكم بها مجموعة كبيرة من الإرادات والأشخاص دونما أي ترابط عادة، وهذا ما سبب حيرتي في تبين ملامح شخصياتهن. وهذا أيضا ما يفسر لم تختفي منك فجأة فتاة صغيرة انسجمعت معها للتو، فهذا كان نداء إرادة والدتها يحركها في الاتجاه المضاد. هذا ما يفسر نظرة فتاة قابلتها في مطعم، ونظرت لك نظرات فاضحة لرغبتها التقرب منك وبادلتها نظرات مطمئنة، ولكنها ظلت في مكانها ولم تقترب منك، تنفيذا لرغبة دقن عاشت من مئات السنين لا ترديها أن تفعل ذلك. نظرية الدمية أيضا تفسر التناقض الغير مستساغ بين معامة تلك الفتاة لك بطيبة لا يشوبها شك، ثم يليه جفاء بعد موافقتها على الخطيب الذي كانت قد جائت لتأخذ رأيك فيه قبل عدة أيام، فهذه إرادة كبار مؤسسين قبيلتنا، لا إلتقاء بين رجل وإمرأة إلا لعلة الجنس!. تصنيع دمية مثالية لتسع كل تلك الإرادات يأخذ وقتا طويلاً في التربية ليأتي بثماره، فإذا تفحصت الإناث تحت السن المفترض لموسم التزاوج لربما وجدت بقايا إنسان ذو إرادة مستقلة. لي صديق ترك خطيبته ذات الأربعة عشر ربيعا بعد أن وجد بها عيب مشابه، فقد كانت ترفض بعض اقتراحاته التي لا تريدها معلنة تذمرها كطفلة صغيرة لم يعلمها أهلها ولا دينها الطاعة بعد. قد تبدو هذه الأمثلة مكررة وسحطية للبعض، وأنا أرجو هؤلاء أني تدبروا قليلا فيما يحدث حولهم. *** يسرد لنا ابسن في هذه المسرحية قصة إحدى الدمى ذات الحياة الطبيعية التي يصيبها ظرف غير عادي يجعلها تعيد التفكير في وضعها الحالي. كما قال راسل فقد يكون أدب ابسن خالي من العاطفة الدرامية كالتي لدى شكسبير، ولكنه يغنيها بنقاشات فعالة يحرك بها المجتمع. فمسرحية النرويجي ابسن التي بدأت عام 1879 أطلقت شرارة من الصراعات والمناقشات، بدأت بإجبار ابسن على تغيير نهاية المسرحية، وانتهت بسن انجلترا لقانون سنة 1881 يعطي الحق للمرأة في مباشرة الأعمال التجارية بنفسها دول ولي أمر، وهو الحق الذي لا تملكه النساء في السعودية حالياً. *** الترجمات العربية كالعادة حاولت محو كل ما يخالف عاداتنا وتقاليدنا، التي لا ذنب لنا فيها. فمثلاً عندما قالت دمية ابسن المدعة نورا " I am afraid, Torvald, I do not exactly know what religion is " تحولت في الترجمة التي معي لـ " يؤسفني يا تورفالد أنني أجهل من الجهل في هذه الناحية " *** وأيضا لا يفوتكم أغنية بيت الدمية لميلاني مارتينز، التي تتحدث عن مشكلة مشابهة بألحان مازالت أجزم بأنها مسروقة حتما من لحظة التفرد المسماة "لانا ديل ري" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HcVv9...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Teresa Proença

    Uma peça em três actos. Os dois primeiros li-os a um ritmo normal, intrigada mas sem especial emoção. A meio do terceiro acto, o palco vibra e o tempo altera-se; como uma cena em câmara lenta vi e senti, de coração apertado, as últimas dezasseis páginas: Nora já não é uma "boneca"; Nora é uma mulher viva. Creio que, actualmente, o final desta peça já não choque (muito) todos os espectadores/leitores, como aconteceu nos finais do século XIX, mas a situação retratada não é, de forma alguma, obsole Uma peça em três actos. Os dois primeiros li-os a um ritmo normal, intrigada mas sem especial emoção. A meio do terceiro acto, o palco vibra e o tempo altera-se; como uma cena em câmara lenta vi e senti, de coração apertado, as últimas dezasseis páginas: Nora já não é uma "boneca"; Nora é uma mulher viva. Creio que, actualmente, o final desta peça já não choque (muito) todos os espectadores/leitores, como aconteceu nos finais do século XIX, mas a situação retratada não é, de forma alguma, obsoleta. Embora noutro contexto, ainda existem muitas Noras bonecas; umas que não sabem que o são; outras que não conseguem deixar de o ser... "o nosso lar tem sido como um quarto de brinquedos. Tenho sido a tua boneca, tal como em casa do papá era a boneca dele; e as crianças têm sido os meus bonecos." "Tu nunca me amaste. Apenas achaste que era agradável estares apaixonado por mim."

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    A doll's house. What image comes to mind when you hear those words? A "perfect" family? A peaceful, innocent domestic situation? Friends dropping in? Preparations for a holiday celebration? Play-time! Yes, Nora and Torvald seem to have the perfect life. Certainly, they have weathered some challenges in life but they have survived. Here we see them with a lovely home, two servants, three playful children, friends, and enough money to celebrate Christmas in the traditional way. Nora plays with the A doll's house. What image comes to mind when you hear those words? A "perfect" family? A peaceful, innocent domestic situation? Friends dropping in? Preparations for a holiday celebration? Play-time! Yes, Nora and Torvald seem to have the perfect life. Certainly, they have weathered some challenges in life but they have survived. Here we see them with a lovely home, two servants, three playful children, friends, and enough money to celebrate Christmas in the traditional way. Nora plays with the children while Torvald chats with a friend in his study. Another friend arrives unexpectedly. There are fond memories of "the old days". How pleasant! But ... enter one more character - a childhood friend, a disgruntled colleague, a jilted lover, a partner in crime (all wrapped up in one person) - and the situation deteriorates quickly. Beneath the calm surface swirls an overwhelming tangle of secrets, fears, suspicions, deceptions, and expectations. Ignorant of her own complicity, Nora attempts to manage the situation but the tangle is too complex. The unravelling is beyond anyone's control. Nora is panic-stricken, anxious, and agitated; she distracts herself by "waiting for a wonderful thing to happen" after the Boxing Day costume party, after she dances her famous tarantella for all the party-goers. In the end, though, the " wonderful thing" was not what anyone expected - neither Nora nor Torvald nor the reader/audience. Play-time is over. The doll's house is a house of mirrors. The distortions are revealed for Nora to see. How will she respond? Listening to the Librivox recording of this play has been my first experience of the work of Henrik Ibsen. This single short review cannot do it justice. I continue to pore over my notes. I continue to be amazed. I need to hear it all again. You need to read it for yourself.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lisa N

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I can’t understand why this is considered by many to be the first true “feminist” play. I cannot stomach many more stories of “feminists” who feel the need to abandon home and family to “find” themselves. What is feminine about walking out on your children, and in this case not even saying good-bye? For a couple of days, I have been pondering what the masculine counterpart to a feminist is. I threw the question out to my family, and my 15-year-old daughter said, “You mean a jerk?” I think that s I can’t understand why this is considered by many to be the first true “feminist” play. I cannot stomach many more stories of “feminists” who feel the need to abandon home and family to “find” themselves. What is feminine about walking out on your children, and in this case not even saying good-bye? For a couple of days, I have been pondering what the masculine counterpart to a feminist is. I threw the question out to my family, and my 15-year-old daughter said, “You mean a jerk?” I think that sums up how I feel about the degeneration of feminism to the notion of self-centeredness and lack of responsibility for one’s actions. This play is very well-written, even intriguing, up until the end, but I’m giving it one star for the lousy ending.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Connie

    Written in 1879, "A Doll's House" was a very modern look at marriage for its time. The play's name comes from the way Nora is treated like a doll or a young child by Torvald, her domineering husband. Nora has a problem since she had secretly forged a note for a loan to finance a trip to a warm climate when her husband was seriously ill. Although Nora seems flighty and silly at the beginning of the play, one senses that she is acting that way partly to please and manipulate her husband. She has i Written in 1879, "A Doll's House" was a very modern look at marriage for its time. The play's name comes from the way Nora is treated like a doll or a young child by Torvald, her domineering husband. Nora has a problem since she had secretly forged a note for a loan to finance a trip to a warm climate when her husband was seriously ill. Although Nora seems flighty and silly at the beginning of the play, one senses that she is acting that way partly to please and manipulate her husband. She has imperfections, but there is a strong woman underneath who wants to experience the world. She needs to find herself as a human being outside the roles of wife and mother. This is a play that can be looked at from many points of view regarding a woman's moral obligations to her family as well as her obligations to herself. The play was entertaining with both comic and serious moments, and its ideas could generate a good discussion.

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