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King Solomon's Mines (Illustrated) + Free AudioBook (Allan Quatermain #1)

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[THIS KINDLE BOOK QUALITY IS GUARANTEED: It has been carefully edited with a fully interactive content.] King Solomon's Mines (1885) is a popular novel by the Victorian adventure writer and fabulist Sir H. Rider Haggard. It tells of a search of an unexplored region of Africa by a group of adventurers led by Allan Quatermain for the missing brother of one of the party. It i [THIS KINDLE BOOK QUALITY IS GUARANTEED: It has been carefully edited with a fully interactive content.] King Solomon's Mines (1885) is a popular novel by the Victorian adventure writer and fabulist Sir H. Rider Haggard. It tells of a search of an unexplored region of Africa by a group of adventurers led by Allan Quatermain for the missing brother of one of the party. It is the first English adventure novel set in Africa, and is considered to be the genesis of the Lost World literary genre. BONUS : • King Solomon's Mines Audiobook. • Biography of H. Rider Haggard. ABOUT THE PUBLISHER: Rutilus classics publishes great works of literature at an affordable price. Our books have been carefully edited with a fully interactive content.


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[THIS KINDLE BOOK QUALITY IS GUARANTEED: It has been carefully edited with a fully interactive content.] King Solomon's Mines (1885) is a popular novel by the Victorian adventure writer and fabulist Sir H. Rider Haggard. It tells of a search of an unexplored region of Africa by a group of adventurers led by Allan Quatermain for the missing brother of one of the party. It i [THIS KINDLE BOOK QUALITY IS GUARANTEED: It has been carefully edited with a fully interactive content.] King Solomon's Mines (1885) is a popular novel by the Victorian adventure writer and fabulist Sir H. Rider Haggard. It tells of a search of an unexplored region of Africa by a group of adventurers led by Allan Quatermain for the missing brother of one of the party. It is the first English adventure novel set in Africa, and is considered to be the genesis of the Lost World literary genre. BONUS : • King Solomon's Mines Audiobook. • Biography of H. Rider Haggard. ABOUT THE PUBLISHER: Rutilus classics publishes great works of literature at an affordable price. Our books have been carefully edited with a fully interactive content.

30 review for King Solomon's Mines (Illustrated) + Free AudioBook (Allan Quatermain #1)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bookdragon Sean

    I sincerely recommend this book that useless degenerate sack of shit that sits in the White House today, indeed, that orange buffoon that is playing at presidency would most likely enjoy this considering his latest move as leader of the U.S.A. For those that don’t know, he is currently contemplating a reversal of the importations of hunting trophies into America; ultimately, encouraging big game hunting in Africa. Americans will be able to go overseas, murder an elephant and come back with its t I sincerely recommend this book that useless degenerate sack of shit that sits in the White House today, indeed, that orange buffoon that is playing at presidency would most likely enjoy this considering his latest move as leader of the U.S.A. For those that don’t know, he is currently contemplating a reversal of the importations of hunting trophies into America; ultimately, encouraging big game hunting in Africa. Americans will be able to go overseas, murder an elephant and come back with its tusks to hang on their walls to boost their little egos. As I write this the final decision has been put on hold because, no doubt, the orange sack of shit has noticed that the backlash will affect his popularity even further. What a leader. Hopefully, tomorrow will bring good news. Original Review -I’m not going to apologise for my language (although I seem to have offended one reader) such words convey the meaning only they could. This novel was absolutely revolting. For all its disgustingness the view point displayed here is a product of history, a vile one, but a product nonetheless. Unlike Conrad, Haggard lacked the artistic skill and the intelligence to create a character that allows him to assume a possible distance from the work. With Conrad there is controversy. With Haggard there is the caricature of Victorian Imperialism and arrogance. Sure, you may argue that Haggard displays the Africans as civilised. And to an extent he does. They have their own martial culture. But through the eyes of his characters this still translates as primitive. Through a lens of Imperialism it is a patronising relationship. The African is ready to be guided and taught the errors of his culture’s ways. To the white man they are debased and primitive. But, for me, this wasn’t the most repulsive thing about the writing. What do the white men do when they go to Africa? This other world? They try to claim it. They go about shooting everything for no apparent reason. Is this how man shows his supposed superiority? Is this how a civilisation exerts its supremacy? Shooting a random giraffe through the neck is considered fair game, bagging a few lions is good sportsmanship and slaughtering an elephant is the best of the best: it is a real accomplishment: a real achievement for a Victorian adventurer. So not only do we have disgusting attitudes toward imperialism, but we have a blatant display of a terrible aspect of the Victorian mind set. We see deplorable men who think they are more than the natural world. The Romantic generation would vomit if they read such unsentimental literature. I want to vomit. Where is the fucking empathy? Did it die with Percy Shelley, Coleridge and Clare? Where is the heart? Hunting is revolting. Shooting animals to boost your own ego is even worse. This is the worst kind of character. The viewpoints of these characters are very much in line with Haggard’s himself; he lived the life of a so called Victorian adventurer. Many did. But not many wrote about it quite like this. He is nothing but a tiny man with a tiny ego. Let’s talk about the glories of hunting shall we? Fuck you Haggard, and fuck your infantile plot. I can’t read this drivel. This book was written for men like Haggard, stupid Victorian men with small minds and no heart. They are the brutes. They are the uncivilised savage. And this is what children were given to read at the time? This is what they saw as an “adventure?” How could Achebe attack Conrad when drivel like this is the cannon? This is a disgusting product of history, one the world is better off forgetting. ************************* Lap it up Trump, this book clearly shares much of your outdated world view.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hossam Arafat

    رواية رائعة مليئة بالمغامرات تدور معظم أحداثها في أفريقيا حيث الغموض و الفضول لأكتشاف المزيد من الاسرار عن تلك القارة العجوز البكر تبدأ الرواية بسير" كيرتس" و الذى يذهب إلى أفريقيا في محاولة للعثور على أخيه المفقود مستعيناً بخدمات "آلان كوترمين" لتبدا رحلة للعثور على الأخ المفقود الذى كان يسعى قبل الأختفاء للعثور على كنوز الملك سليمان الشهيرة التي يقال أنه أخفاها في بعض الجبال خلف الصحراء الكتاب بالطبع يحوى الكثير من الوصف و التفاصيل عن تلك الرحلة ، لكنها تفاصيل لا يمل منها القارئ، تسلسل الأحداث ب رواية رائعة مليئة بالمغامرات تدور معظم أحداثها في أفريقيا حيث الغموض و الفضول لأكتشاف المزيد من الاسرار عن تلك القارة العجوز البكر تبدأ الرواية بسير" كيرتس" و الذى يذهب إلى أفريقيا في محاولة للعثور على أخيه المفقود مستعيناً بخدمات "آلان كوترمين" لتبدا رحلة للعثور على الأخ المفقود الذى كان يسعى قبل الأختفاء للعثور على كنوز الملك سليمان الشهيرة التي يقال أنه أخفاها في بعض الجبال خلف الصحراء الكتاب بالطبع يحوى الكثير من الوصف و التفاصيل عن تلك الرحلة ، لكنها تفاصيل لا يمل منها القارئ، تسلسل الأحداث بطئ في البداية لكنه سريع في النصف الثاني من الرواية، النهاية حزينة و متسرعة بعض الشئ لكنها أضافت سحرا خاصاً على الرواية كتاب رائع أرشحه لمحبي قراءة أدب المغامرات و التشويق

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sanjay Gautam

    I always fascinated treasure hunt books and this book did really surpassed my expectations. A real adventure it was! Its a story of: survival, revenge, making of a king, greatest treasure hunt, and friendship. I was hooked from the start and the story just got more riveting with every page. This book reminded me of many adventure movies, both from Hollywood and Bollywood (it is the nickname for the Hindi language film industry, based in Mumbai, India). And now I can guess from where those movie I always fascinated treasure hunt books and this book did really surpassed my expectations. A real adventure it was! Its a story of: survival, revenge, making of a king, greatest treasure hunt, and friendship. I was hooked from the start and the story just got more riveting with every page. This book reminded me of many adventure movies, both from Hollywood and Bollywood (it is the nickname for the Hindi language film industry, based in Mumbai, India). And now I can guess from where those movies have got their inspiration. Unlike movies, which always have some love story interwoven in the script, there is but a very minor love story which ends quite differently and abruptly, and I kinda liked it. Even though many subplots were quite predictable, I was never left disappointed, rather it was a very interesting story filled with thrill and suspense (and I was always eager and excited to find what's going to happen next), which culminates with a happy ending. Highly recommended!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    This book is the response to a five-shilling dare from Haggard's brother that he couldn't write a book half as good as Treasure Island. Haggard was enormously popular in his time; he and Robert Louis Stevenson were the two dominant adventure writers It's enormously imaginative. Alan Quatermain is a brilliant character, a wiry and wily old Ulysses who describes himself as a coward. There's a scene near the end involving artificial stalagmites that's exhilaratingly evocative and creative (and creep This book is the response to a five-shilling dare from Haggard's brother that he couldn't write a book half as good as Treasure Island. Haggard was enormously popular in his time; he and Robert Louis Stevenson were the two dominant adventure writers It's enormously imaginative. Alan Quatermain is a brilliant character, a wiry and wily old Ulysses who describes himself as a coward. There's a scene near the end involving artificial stalagmites that's exhilaratingly evocative and creative (and creepy). And at the same time, you see a bunch of now-familiar bits appearing for the first time; it's impossible to miss the gleam of Indiana Jones in Quatermain's eye. So why isn't Haggard as well-loved today as he was back then? It might be consistency; Stevenson has Kidnapped, Treasure Island and Jekyll & Hyde as three classics, and Haggard only has this and maybe She, which I haven't read. And Jekyll & Hyde is kindof on a level slightly higher than any of these pure adventure stories, as fun as they are. But it's probably also due to Haggard's awkward views on race. This is a novel of the colonial era. It depicts white men exploiting native populations for treasure, and it has a reputation as racist. Is it actually racist? Er...how's "not as racist as people seem to think" sound? Like I'm equivocating? Okay, to get into this you're gonna have to (view spoiler)[: Quatermain and his men arrive in a fictional African nation and promptly exploit local politics to overthrow the local king and install one more friendly to their mission, which is to loot the kingdom of its treasure. They cheerfully present themselves as gods and take advantage of the locals' superstition, and it's quite clear that the natives need the intervention of the white gods to bring justice to their kingdom. So far, so bad. On the other hand: they unknowingly bring with them the exiled, rightful ruler of the kingdom, who is in fact exploiting them in order to return to power. This guy knows perfectly well they're not gods, and is alternately amused and annoyed at their charades. He, and several other native characters, are presented as shrewd, tactically adept, dignified men. Quatermain's crew help him back to the throne and then leave, under stern orders that white people (and particularly their missionaries) are never to set foot in his land again. This, then, is clearly not a colonialist book. Both the locals and the whites are in accordance that continued white interference would be annoying at best and catastrophic at worst. Given the times, and that Haggard was himself part of the colonial infrastructure, one could argue that this is a pretty liberal view. Haggard repeatedly compares this African society to European society: "In Kukualand, as among the Germans [...], every able-bodied man is a soldier" (Ch. IX). Cruel Africans are compared to cruel Europeans: "'One,' counted Twala the king, just like a black Madame DeFarge," before doing something particularly ghastly (Ch. X). (Yeah, I kinda loved that Tale of Two Cities reference.) In both cases, the message is that this is a savage, cruel land, and so is Europe. And listen to the tone of contempt in the king's farewell speech: "Ye have the stones; now you would go to Natal and across the moving black water and sell them, and be rich, as it is the desire of the white man's heart to be." (Ch. XIX) It's not perfect. Quatermain's crew make the new king promise not to go indiscriminately slaughtering his people like the old one did, and he sortof grumbles about it, although you never have the impression he was planning on doing that anyway. The view here seems to be of an Africa that could use a little interference from Europe - but temporary and wise interference. So, y'know, that's not how Africa has ever seen it. But it's also not how many Europeans of the time saw it. Honestly, I was more troubled by Quatermain's tendency to shoot every animal he saw than by his behavior toward the locals. (hide spoiler)] That may have been more discussion of race than you really wanted, but I'm trying to rescue this book here. Like Heart of Darkness, it's troubling, but it's also better than its reputation. And it's so much fucking fun to read, man. It's worth a little rehabilitation.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nayra.Hassan

    هل أنا جنتلمان؟ هكذا تساءل ألان كوارترمين في ذكرى ميلاده ال55 لقد عملت بيدي منذ سن 11 و لقد قتلت عشرات الرجال لكني لم الوث يدي بدم بريء لقد صرعت 65اسدا و كان لابد ان ينهش ساقي الأسد السادس و الستين فلنشد الرحال لافريقيا مع رواية حملات 🗻 كلاسيكية {لكن نحن في أفريقيا اصلا💃}نتعرف على البريطانيين مهاوييس التنقيب عن الكنوز و الآثار حملة انقاذ ممزوجة بالبحث عن كنز و بالطبع سرعان ما تتحول ككل قصص المغامرات "لصراع على البقاء احياء" و قطعة واحدة اهم ما في هذه الروايات التي تنتمي لعهد الاستعمار 1885 الا نحم هل أنا جنتلمان؟ هكذا تساءل ألان كوارترمين في ذكرى ميلاده ال55 لقد عملت بيدي منذ سن 11 و لقد قتلت عشرات الرجال لكني لم الوث يدي بدم بريء لقد صرعت 65اسدا و كان لابد ان ينهش ساقي الأسد السادس و الستين فلنشد الرحال لافريقيا مع رواية حملات 🗻 كلاسيكية {لكن نحن في أفريقيا اصلا💃}نتعرف على البريطانيين مهاوييس التنقيب عن الكنوز و الآثار حملة انقاذ ممزوجة بالبحث عن كنز و بالطبع سرعان ما تتحول ككل قصص المغامرات "لصراع على البقاء احياء" و قطعة واحدة اهم ما في هذه الروايات التي تنتمي لعهد الاستعمار 1885 الا نحملها الكثير و لا ننتظر منها معلومات مؤكدة ابدا ..فلا تنتظر معلومات شافية عن النبي سليمان عليه السلام و لا بلقيس و لا كنوزهما مجرد رواية مغامرات سطحية الشخصيات مليئة بالاكشن و المفاجآت التي صارت بلهاء الان .. و بالتالي ستظل نموذجية لتتحول لأفلام مرارا كما حدث منذ الثلاثينات حتى ألفيتنا الحالية و لكن يبدو الى اللان ان شون كونري هو افضل من تقمص شخصية كوارترماين

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jan-Maat

    I got my copy of this book on holiday in Devon as a child, probably on a Wednesday afternoon. The bookshop was shut, but there was a shelf of books outside with sign asking you to put the money under the door if you wanted something and for twenty pence I had myself a copy. It is a Vikings meet Zulus story, noble savages and fearless adventurers (view spoiler)[ with false teeth (hide spoiler)] crossed with the mythical wealth of King Solomon from the old testament with a hidden heir and a treasur I got my copy of this book on holiday in Devon as a child, probably on a Wednesday afternoon. The bookshop was shut, but there was a shelf of books outside with sign asking you to put the money under the door if you wanted something and for twenty pence I had myself a copy. It is a Vikings meet Zulus story, noble savages and fearless adventurers (view spoiler)[ with false teeth (hide spoiler)] crossed with the mythical wealth of King Solomon from the old testament with a hidden heir and a treasure map book. It comes of course with the best advice for any traveller determined to bring about a coup de etat in a hidden kingdom populated by noble savages - always know when the next eclipse is due. Of particular interest in the nineteenth century racial thinking of the author is that when the White men are armoured in antique battle gear and armed with battle axes and spears they are revealed to be intrinsically skilled in their use. Which I suppose just goes to show why racists have such high self-esteem. Naturally not all the savages are noble - some of them (dramatic pause) are women, or as they are also known in the story: witches. Ah, there is nothing quite like Victorian values.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Wanda

    ***2017 Summer Lovin’ Reading List*** King Solomon’s Mines is very much a product of its Victorian, colonial times. Don’t go into this book expecting anything else. Allan Quartermain is an unlikely protagonist, an elephant hunter, something that would get him publically shamed on the internet nowadays. This is very much an adventure tale, set in deepest, darkest Africa. White men have no doubt that they are at the very tippy-top of the social hierarchy and have no compunctions about expressing ***2017 Summer Lovin’ Reading List*** King Solomon’s Mines is very much a product of its Victorian, colonial times. Don’t go into this book expecting anything else. Allan Quartermain is an unlikely protagonist, an elephant hunter, something that would get him publically shamed on the internet nowadays. This is very much an adventure tale, set in deepest, darkest Africa. White men have no doubt that they are at the very tippy-top of the social hierarchy and have no compunctions about expressing that belief. They believe Africans to be primitive, superstitious, and prefer them subservient. An African may be king in his own lost-kingdom, but must still admit his unworthiness to equality with a ne’er-do-well hunter like Quartermain. Not recommended for the overly politically correct, but providing many insights into the colonial mindset that still plagues us today. A fantastical adventure in the Victorian style.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Henry Avila

    Allan Quatermain, is hired by Sir Henry Curtis, to find his younger brother, George. Quatermain, a hunter among other things, could use the money and agrees to guide the dangerous expedition. Along with Sir Henry, is Captain John Good, former British navy officer and a close friend of Curtis. Both believe George, has traveled to the interior of Africa,(set in late 1800's) seeking his fortune. Having quarreled with Sir Henry , the penniless and proud man left England, not wanting to depend on his Allan Quatermain, is hired by Sir Henry Curtis, to find his younger brother, George. Quatermain, a hunter among other things, could use the money and agrees to guide the dangerous expedition. Along with Sir Henry, is Captain John Good, former British navy officer and a close friend of Curtis. Both believe George, has traveled to the interior of Africa,(set in late 1800's) seeking his fortune. Having quarreled with Sir Henry , the penniless and proud man left England, not wanting to depend on his wealthy older brother.George was looking for the legendary King Solomon's Mines!Meeting Umbopa, a mysterious African man,who seems to know a great deal about the unknown territory, they need to explore. And Umbopa consents to go with the Englishmen there. Journeying through a waterless desert, they barely survive the ordeal. Next comes a warlike tribe in Kukuanaland, the strange country ruled by Twala , their unfriendly king.Also an evil ageless witch Gagool,who helps Twala ,terrorize the people.And who the whole tribe fears. Diamonds ,numerous as grains of sand are found, but where is George ? And how to get out of Kukuanaland? Umbopa reveals he's Ignosi,the rightful king. When many tribesmen join him, in his quest to overthrow Twala , civil war breaks out. Blood flows freely, until the conflict is ended.Can they escape through the mountains and back to England? An enjoyable adventure novel, from the zenith days of the British Empire.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Every so often I get the feeling that a good old timey adventure book would be a good thing to read. This is (hopefully) the last time I think this as the results are always dire. Conan Doyle's "The Lost World" was one hell of a struggle. Chesterton's "The Man Who Was Thursday" was dreadful. However, Rider Haggard's "King Solomon's Mines" takes the prize for most unreadable load of old toss ever. 3 Englishmen ponce into Africa on a treasure hunt. They cross romantic terrain, shoot majestic anima Every so often I get the feeling that a good old timey adventure book would be a good thing to read. This is (hopefully) the last time I think this as the results are always dire. Conan Doyle's "The Lost World" was one hell of a struggle. Chesterton's "The Man Who Was Thursday" was dreadful. However, Rider Haggard's "King Solomon's Mines" takes the prize for most unreadable load of old toss ever. 3 Englishmen ponce into Africa on a treasure hunt. They cross romantic terrain, shoot majestic animals, patronise and insult black people, before leaving with a few pocketfuls of giant diamonds back to Blighty. What ho! Sounds a bit of a lark, what? It's not. First off, Haggard has his hero Quatermain say in the first chapter that they went to Africa, did this, did that, and made it back home with the treasure. Oh great, now I'm really on the edge of my seat. Now when Quatermain and chums are in danger and the chapter ends on a "cliffhanger" (by Victorian standards) I'll know that they make it out because this was explained in the first chapter! Also, Haggard has the annoying habit of describing every single meaningless detail in a scene. So when they cross the desert, you have endless descriptions of wind, and how thirsty everyone is, and how if they don't make it they'll die and the characters start whinging and don't stop and will they make it..? Look an oasis, we're saved! No tension whatsoever anyway, we all know they make it BECAUSE THEY SAY SO AT THE START! All this needless exposition and attempts at drama are useless if we know the characters make it. The most offending attempt at literature in this amazingly labelled "classic" is the way Haggard deals with Africans. They're all "noble savages" who for some reason speak like medieval dukes. "Thou hast", "ye", "sayest not", "hark", etc all make regular appearances in their speech but does he honestly think Africans speak like that?! The Englishmen patronise the Africans like pets and Haggard has the Africans run about like gormless children, either behaving "nobly" ie. standing around bored saying nothing, or like coked up teens with a hormone imbalance, ie. screaming, tearing hair, killing people randomly. No attempt at characterisation is made and none of the characters seem at all real. In fact they all sound remarkably the same, like a middle class educated Englishman. This is the most tedious novel I've ever read, it actually made me angry while I was reading. Haggard can't seem to accept the reader has the capacity to fill in the gaps. For example, rather than say "they went to the ridge and sat down", he has to say "they gathered up their things (items are listed and digressed), and after several parting words (list numerous mundane words), hastened up the path (description of path and weather), while we wondered about (list everything thats happened thus far) and upon reaching the ridge (list various mundane observations the characters have made while walking) we sat down and gazed at the view (list needless description of mountain range)." It's EXHAUSTING. I hurled the book away from me every time I sat it down (about every 3 chapters) and am amazed at my tolerance for poor writing. How is this a classic? It's not at all on the level of "Great Expectations" or "The Picture of Dorian Gray" or numerous other examples. There's no profundity, no great story, no great writing. Haggard is a very minor writer and his contribution to literature is very small, if at all recognisable. I am amazed this is listed as a classic when it is the 1880s version of a Lee Child novel. Give this a wide book berth, it's appalling.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mohammed Atef

    رواية جيدة مليئة بالمغامرات والمتعة وتسلسل الأحداث بها سريع وغير متوقع أحياناً

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    Okay, good adventure story that has been around for a long time. it's been made into several movies (none of which actually resemble the book all that much. For one thing, there's no heroine...at all. There's only two semi-main female characters in the entire book). First, there are things in this book that will offend some readers. They are "unintentional" the book is a product of it's time, the late 1800s. The racial attitudes here are from that era and anyone picking up the book should be awar Okay, good adventure story that has been around for a long time. it's been made into several movies (none of which actually resemble the book all that much. For one thing, there's no heroine...at all. There's only two semi-main female characters in the entire book). First, there are things in this book that will offend some readers. They are "unintentional" the book is a product of it's time, the late 1800s. The racial attitudes here are from that era and anyone picking up the book should be aware of that going in. There are a couple of things that I'm sure will be found offensive to many (and ironically so in some ways as the writer is actually "being racially liberal" for his day). If possible, forgive these dated faults and see the positive story that's here. But, no one can blame those who find the book too unpalatable to read. It's just the way it is. Okay, that being said the story is imaginative and rolls along pretty reliably. The writing style holds up pretty well though there are times when it gets a bit tedious. Hang on it's just being a bit flowery and detailed. It picks back up. There is a "slight" anticlimax tied into the ending but it's just used to tie up a dangling story thread. Again, not a bad thing. So, be aware of the fact that there are some troubling 19th century racial stereotypes and read it for the story. Pretty good.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Hend

    من أفضل كتب المغامرات التي قرأتها الفكرة جيدة رغم غرابتها، وتسلسل الأحداث سريع ومشوق للغاية، والنهاية جيدة

  13. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Free download available at Project Gutenberg. Opening lines: It is a curious thing that at my age— fifty-five last birthday— I should find myself taking up a pen to try to write a history. Quotations: I asked a page or two back, what is a gentleman? I'll answer the question now: A Royal Naval officer is, in a general sort of way, though of course there may be a black sheep among them here and there. For to my mind, however beautiful a view may be, it requires the presence of man to make it complete, Free download available at Project Gutenberg. Opening lines: It is a curious thing that at my age— fifty-five last birthday— I should find myself taking up a pen to try to write a history. Quotations: I asked a page or two back, what is a gentleman? I'll answer the question now: A Royal Naval officer is, in a general sort of way, though of course there may be a black sheep among them here and there. For to my mind, however beautiful a view may be, it requires the presence of man to make it complete, but perhaps that is because I have lived so much in the wilderness, and therefore know the value of civilisation, though to be sure it drives away the game. The Garden of Eden, no doubt, looked fair before man was, but I always think that it must have been fairer when Eve adorned it. But there is no journey upon this earth that a man may not make if he sets his heart to it. Listen! what is life? It is a feather, it is the seed of the grass, blown hither and thither, sometimes multiplying itself and dying in the act, sometimes carried away into the heavens. Life is nothing. Life is all. It is the Hand with which we hold off Death. It is the glow-worm that shines in the night-time and is black in the morning; it is the white breath of the oxen in winter; it is the little shadow that runs across the grass and loses itself at sunset." Our future was so completely unknown, and I think that the unknown and the awful always bring a man nearer to his Maker. Yet man dies not whilst the world, at once his mother and his monument, remains. There are two things in the world, as I have found out, which cannot be prevented: you cannot keep a Zulu from fighting, or a sailor from falling in love upon the slightest provocation!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Corey

    Typically, I’m a fan of Victorian adventure and mystery novels. In fact, I’ve been saving H. Rider Haggard’s masterpiece, “King Solomon’s Mines,” for almost two years because I thought I would enjoy it so much. Sadly, I was much deceived in the character of Haggard’s “great” adventure novel. The story goes that Haggard read “Treasure Island” (which I incidentally very much enjoyed), decided that he could easily write something better and made a bet to that effect. And with the idea of besting Ro Typically, I’m a fan of Victorian adventure and mystery novels. In fact, I’ve been saving H. Rider Haggard’s masterpiece, “King Solomon’s Mines,” for almost two years because I thought I would enjoy it so much. Sadly, I was much deceived in the character of Haggard’s “great” adventure novel. The story goes that Haggard read “Treasure Island” (which I incidentally very much enjoyed), decided that he could easily write something better and made a bet to that effect. And with the idea of besting Robert Louis Stevenson, Haggard commenced writing “King Solomon’s Mines,” an African adventure tale far more steeped in the imperialism and bigotry of the time than “Treasure Island” or probably any other Victorian adventure novel I’ve ever read. Haggard wrote a best-seller and won his bet, but the book in and of itself was quite disappointing. Most things were predictable and Allan Quartermaine's remarks on the native Africans are appalling to modern ears, not even in a dated "forgive them their trespasses" kind of way, in a genuinely bad way. In short, I was quite disappointed by this almost ridiculous book and I don't think Haggard should have won his bet.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Meseceva

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Loše strane ovog avanturističkog romana su da je pun predvidljivih zapleta i raspleta i pisan stilom koji je mahom nefluidan i površan. Rasizam ("žene u plemenu su bile lepe za crnkinje") i brutalnost prema životinjama (pri susretu sa krdom slonova narator kaže da bi ga grizla savest da nije zastao da smakne nekog zbog kljova) u službi su kolonijalnih vremena u kojima je roman pisan. No, ovo je uprkos tome u celini zabavna laganica bez praznog hoda, ima i svojih blistavih momenata, interesantan Loše strane ovog avanturističkog romana su da je pun predvidljivih zapleta i raspleta i pisan stilom koji je mahom nefluidan i površan. Rasizam ("žene u plemenu su bile lepe za crnkinje") i brutalnost prema životinjama (pri susretu sa krdom slonova narator kaže da bi ga grizla savest da nije zastao da smakne nekog zbog kljova) u službi su kolonijalnih vremena u kojima je roman pisan. No, ovo je uprkos tome u celini zabavna laganica bez praznog hoda, ima i svojih blistavih momenata, interesantan lik stare veštice Gagole i sve u svemu ocenjujem solidnom trojkom.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Frogy (Ivana)

    Ocena je 4,5*/5*, ali fenomenalno Makondovo izdanje zaslužuje 10* ;)

  17. 5 out of 5

    LeAnne

    When reading and then reviewing a novel written in the 1880s, one has to sort of teleport back a century or so to be fair. Reading an artifact vs a contemporary work of historical fiction requires an entirely different barometer. In many instances, the reader has to put aside the shock of sexism and xenophobia in order to jump into the tale. Occasionally, the old styled language and pace is painful. I remember once being iced in at the tiny Tupelo, Mississippi airport for seven hours. There was When reading and then reviewing a novel written in the 1880s, one has to sort of teleport back a century or so to be fair. Reading an artifact vs a contemporary work of historical fiction requires an entirely different barometer. In many instances, the reader has to put aside the shock of sexism and xenophobia in order to jump into the tale. Occasionally, the old styled language and pace is painful. I remember once being iced in at the tiny Tupelo, Mississippi airport for seven hours. There was no coffee shop or sundry store - just vending machines, and the only thing I had to read with him me was "Far From the Madding Crowd." Omg. I actually prayed for death a time or two. But not so with this! Sure, it is dated, but this is the still-muscle-bound great, great grandpa to Indiana Jones. Like "In Cold Blood" being the firstborn of the true crime genre, "Mines" is the initial spark of every action-adventure-quest story written. Sure, they eat the hearts of elephants in here. But there is a bunch of polygamy in the Bible, and its readers overlook that, right? I had a blast reading this old tale. Give it a go!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Issicratea

    I was inspired to reread Rider Haggard’s King Solomon’s Mines by noticing that it existed in an Oxford World’s Classics edition, edited by Roger Luckhurst, whose excellent edition of The Portrait of a Lady for the same series I had just finished. The temptation to see what contemporary literary criticism would make of this magnificent piece of hokum, which I last read when I was about eleven, was just too great. Literally all that King Solomon’s Mines has in common with The Portrait of a Lady is I was inspired to reread Rider Haggard’s King Solomon’s Mines by noticing that it existed in an Oxford World’s Classics edition, edited by Roger Luckhurst, whose excellent edition of The Portrait of a Lady for the same series I had just finished. The temptation to see what contemporary literary criticism would make of this magnificent piece of hokum, which I last read when I was about eleven, was just too great. Literally all that King Solomon’s Mines has in common with The Portrait of a Lady is the relative chronological proximity of their composition; James’s novel was published in 1880-81, Haggard’s classic yarn in 1885. As Luckhurst’s introduction to the latter makes clear, the turn to a renewed romance form on the part of writers like R.L. Stevenson and Haggard was in part a reaction to a perceived decadence in the tradition of the realist novel, as represented by James and his ilk. This decadence had a strong gender dimension, in Haggard’s perception, at least. Novels were girly! Some of them even had women as their protagonists, heaven forbid, “soliloquizing and dissecting”, while the men who appeared in them were “emasculated specimens of an overwrought age” (Gilbert Osmond and Ned Rosier, take a bow.) No reader is ever going to accuse Haggard’s professional big game-hunter narrator, Allan Quatermain, nor his quest-fellow, the mighty and majestic Sir Henry Curtis, of being “emasculated specimens.” (I’m not quite so sure about the third in their party, the dandyish naval captain John Good, with his eyeglass and his taste for the ladies and his “beautiful white legs.”) The three set forth into unknown lands in search of Curtis’s lost brother, who has disappeared while searching in the dark heart of Africa (a.k.a. more or less Matabeleland, in modern Zimbabwe) for the fabled gold and diamond mines of the biblical King Solomon. Curtis is driven by pure family sentiment, while lucre is part of the incentive for Quatermain and Good. The 1885 publicity campaign for King Solomon’s Mines billed it as “The Most Amazing Book Ever Written,” and I don’t have too much of a quibble about that description. Amazement follows on amazement in endless succession (in no particular order: uncanny mummifications, mass elephant slaughter, a near-death desert crossing, sinister witch cults, a full-scale civil war, a showdown in a labyrinthine cavern deep within the earth). Luckhurst notes that Jung was a fan of Haggard, and it’s not difficult to see why; archetypes abound. The novel is also fascinating as a reworking of the medieval romance, and its former updating, the Gothic novel. Although I don’t want to talk it up too much (Haggard isn’t a patch on his fellow fabulist Stevenson as a stylist), I’m glad I revisited King Solomon’s Mines; it’s a constantly thought-provoking read. Part of what makes it so, of course, is its setting in Africa, which Haggard knew well from personal experience. One reason why I felt so curious to reread this book with the eyes of an adult was to see how it measured up ideologically, as a work crafted at the height of the so-called Scramble for Africa and dealing with three white men’s quest for treasure in that land. I found it very interesting on that score and far more nuanced than I had been expecting. There are all kinds of words and deeds and attitudes in the novel that will make a modern reader cringe, of course, but I finished the book fully in accord with Luckhurst’s conclusion, that those who read Haggard’s imperial romances as simplistic forms of propaganda, cynically aimed at indoctrinating boys, big and little, into the glories of empire, fail to read the moral ambivalence that saturates “King Solomon’s Mines.” Haggard’s mysterious “lost tribe” race of noble warriors, the Kukuanas, are otherized and exoticized like crazy; but Haggard elegiacally celebrates their courage; and he unexpectedly sets up their young king, Ignosi, as a kind of black twin to his perfect English gentleman, Sir Henry Curtis. Luckhurst reads Haggard’s idealizing treatment of the solidarity between his white adventurers and the Kukuanas as a mournful fantasy revisiting of the recent Anglo-Zulu war (1879)—less a euphemistic mystification of the brutal realities of empire than a wistful imagining of what might have been.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ah Med Yahia

    هل تزوج النبي سليمان الملكة بلقيس أكان أحد أبوي بلقيس من الجان ؟؟؟ وهل يرجع نسبها الي سام بن نوح؟؟ القران توقف عند نقطة معينة في ذكر الملكة بلقيس ولم يذكر ان الملك سليمان قد تزوجها ... ولكن العلماء والمفسرين لهم أراء كثيرة في ذلك الطبيب "ادمز" الذي حارب الطاعون والتيفوئد حتا اخذ منه زوجته .. الان يحارب حاكم مصر ويشاهد المهدي يخطف ابنه الذي بيع لتجار العبيد ولكن اسوار السجن منعته من كل شئ ... حتا علم ان ابنه استقر به الحال في عالم موازي لعالمنا ف صحاري افريقيا .... يسمون قبائل "الفنج" كيف اتي ذلك هل تزوج النبي سليمان الملكة بلقيس أكان أحد أبوي بلقيس من الجان ؟؟؟ وهل يرجع نسبها الي سام بن نوح؟؟ القران توقف عند نقطة معينة في ذكر الملكة بلقيس ولم يذكر ان الملك سليمان قد تزوجها ... ولكن العلماء والمفسرين لهم أراء كثيرة في ذلك الطبيب "ادمز" الذي حارب الطاعون والتيفوئد حتا اخذ منه زوجته .. الان يحارب حاكم مصر ويشاهد المهدي يخطف ابنه الذي بيع لتجار العبيد ولكن اسوار السجن منعته من كل شئ ... حتا علم ان ابنه استقر به الحال في عالم موازي لعالمنا ف صحاري افريقيا .... يسمون قبائل "الفنج" كيف اتي ذلك الخاتم الذي اهداه الملك سليمان للملكة بلقيس الي عالمنا ؟؟ بل كيف لتلك الممالك ان تتخفي ف تلك الصحراء ولا يراها أحد .. اننا ف عالم موازي عالم يحكمه حفيدة الملكة بلقيس "أم النجاشي" عالم يقام فيه الصراع بين الخير والشر .. عالم يعبد فيه قوما الله وحده ... واقوام تعبد اصنام تحت طوعه الكهنة عالم سيدخله ادمز للبحث عن رودريك ابنه المفقود .... ام "هيجز" "اورام" "كويك" كان جُل فكرهم الحصول علي كنوز سليمان صراعات طويلة تتصارع فيه سليلة الملوك مع قبائل "الفنج" حتي هزمتهم ... ولكن للخيانة اوجه كثيرة انقلب العم ضد الملكة فطرحت الدماء والدمار ارض الاجداد حُوكم الغرباء بالطرد من "المور" وحصلوا علي ما جاوا من اجله .... أم واحد منهم فحصل ع سليلة الملوك كنزه الحقيقي فعابد الاصنام المسيطر عليه من الكهنة .. قاتل .. المؤمن الذي احب الخيانة وقتله اهله من دمه في سبيل الوصول الي الحكم فضرب الظالم قرينه الظالم

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mohamed Khaled Sherif

    عودة مرة آخرى إلى سلسلة "روايات عالمية" ورواية جديدة لكاتب إنجليزي وترجمة "نبيل فاروق. الرواية تُعد مُغامرة جيدة، ولكن للأسف لم تعجبني كثيراً. أجواء الرواية كانت جيدة، أهداف ودوافع كل شخصية جيدة، ولكنك ستشعر أنك قرأت هذه الرواية من قبل عشرات المرات. حتى "الإلتواءة" في النهاية، كانت مُتوقعة وواضحة ولم تُفاجئني بالطبع. على كُل حال، أتمنى أن لا يكون هذا هو حال كُل السلسلة.

  21. 5 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    The original Indiana Jones 3 September 2013 I remember watching a movie based on this book starring Richard Chamberlain. I actually quite enjoyed the film, though one of the major differences that I discovered between the film and the book is the inclusion of a beautiful white female. I guess that is what one really has to expect from Hollywood, particularly since there have been a lot of Hollywood movies that have been based on books of old and they have thrown in a girl because, well, a Hollywo The original Indiana Jones 3 September 2013 I remember watching a movie based on this book starring Richard Chamberlain. I actually quite enjoyed the film, though one of the major differences that I discovered between the film and the book is the inclusion of a beautiful white female. I guess that is what one really has to expect from Hollywood, particularly since there have been a lot of Hollywood movies that have been based on books of old and they have thrown in a girl because, well, a Hollywood movie just isn't a Hollywood movie unless there is a girl for the protagonist to fall in love. As for the book, well, it was clearly an adventure story written for the younger audiences and certainly not a post-colonial commentary in the vein of books such as Joseph Conrad's The Heart of Darkness. In fact there is pretty much no social commentary in this book at all, rather it is designed to appeal to people's lust for adventure and exploring the deep and unknown areas of the world as they were at this time. When Haggard was writing, much of the world had already been mapped, though there were still large sections of the African, South American, and Asian interior that remained places of mystery. However, despite them being unexplored, the general attitude of the colonial powers at the time was to simply claim those areas and explore them later. I believe, at least with Africa, that the land that was claimed along the coast pretty much extended inland until it pretty much hit the centre, which is why you basically see a patchwork of countries in Africa which are not necessarily divided along tribal lines. As the colonial powers began to penetrate the interior of the continent, they would then set up their own claims on this land. However, as I advised, this book has nothing to do with colonial expansion, and everything to do with the exploration of a dark continent in search of a mythical gold (or diamond) mine. The story of King Solomon's mines goes back to the Old Testament (and it is interesting that these early stories still have Christian references attached to them) where there is reference to mines in the land of Ophir from which great wealth was brought to Jerusalem to establish Solomon's rule. Personally, I have no idea where Ophir is supposed to be located, though I suspect modern scholarship has more understanding of it than did Haggard. The book itself was okay: not that great and not that exciting. In a way I preferred the movie because, well, it was an Indiana Jones style adventure movie. I guess the book was trying to be like that as well, and I suspect that Spielberg was influenced somewhat by the writings of Haggard when he created Indiana Jones. It is also interesting to finally read the book that ended up inspiring that movie that I quite enjoyed watching. However, if you are expecting Richard Chamberlain (and I simply cannot picture Alan Quartermain not being picture Richard Chamberlain): to go hacking through jungles, running away from giant boulders, and solving puzzles in an ancient mine, well, you do get some of that, but the bulk of the book seems to be sent in the land of some lost African tribe and how Quartermain and his cohorts act to change their entire culture and to establish a king that will be more British than barbaric. In fact they seem to go to war against those members of the tribe that will not accept and adapt to the British way of life. In a way it is reminiscent of the colonial era when the colonists would come along and force the inhabitants of the land to become British, and if they did things that the British found repugnant then they would be forced to stop. In fact, that still happens today in our enlightened culture. These days this is called human rights. For instance, if a culture, who has been doing things a certain way for hundreds of years (such as forcing women to wear veils) is seen by the enlightened academia of the Western World as being oppressive, then the enlightened academia believes that it is their right to go in there and stop them from doing that. Look, I am very much in favour of human rights, and very much against the oppression of women and other minorities, however, let us not criticise the British for interfering in the culture of the colonised and claim that they were being imperialist when we on the left are doing exactly the same thing ourselves.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Checkman

    The novel that started the "Lost World" genre. It's from this book that (eventually) Indiana Jones evolved not to mention all the other numerous fictional adventurers. The genre is mostly moribund in 2016 - a victim of the 21st century. But the books and movies are still out there and "King Solomon's Mines" was the one that started it. Well what can one say about a novel from the late Victorian era? The writing, characterizations, plot devices and ideas are very different from what we expect fro The novel that started the "Lost World" genre. It's from this book that (eventually) Indiana Jones evolved not to mention all the other numerous fictional adventurers. The genre is mostly moribund in 2016 - a victim of the 21st century. But the books and movies are still out there and "King Solomon's Mines" was the one that started it. Well what can one say about a novel from the late Victorian era? The writing, characterizations, plot devices and ideas are very different from what we expect from an adventure novel in 2016. Some people are thrown off by the (now) politically incorrect attitudes. I would argue those people evidently fail to understand that Mr. Haggard was a product of the late nineteenth century and is not of their generation. However I will admit that I was uncomfortable with how our three protagonists just blast away at anything on four legs, but in 1885, nobody thought about conservation or the possibility that over-hunting could contribute to the extinction of a species. Mr. Haggard was writing a novel for people who had never been to Africa. It's an adventure novel and one of the aspects of being in Africa was hunting/killing elephants. Quatermain is a professional elephant hunter and when many thought of Africa they thought of hunting the large African animals. Of course one of the other aspects of Africa was the tribes (the "savages" and "blacks" as Haggard and others referred to them) and the Empire's treatment of the natives. They were considered to be the children of the various European Empires (British, French, Belgian, Italian, Spanish, German, Portugese) and were looked upon as being savage, backwards and genetically inferior. Allan Quatermain's ideas about the natives seems fairly backwards now, but in 1885 they were considered liberal. Haggard has Quatermain telling his companions that he knows Africans who are the equal of whites and acknowledges that he has known many a brave and faithful native. To our modern ears it sounds like he's describing a faithful dog ,which that isn't too far off, but it was pretty radical in 1885. It doesn't change the uncomfortable feeling that one gets occasionally, but it is what it is. All I can say is don't read the book if this bothers you. An interesting novel and a historical artifact. It has it's place in literary history and connects one to a previous generation (all of whom are now long dead). Personally I enjoyed this novel. It was more involving than I was expecting, but without the dense writing found in other books from the time. I believe that "King Solomon's Mines" is the late nineteenth century equivalent of a beach read. Just popcorn fiction designed to be escapist fare and it still works in 2016. I'm glad that I finally decided to give it a try.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Oziel Bispo

    Um dos melhores livros de Aventura que já li, Onde um experiente caçador de tesouros é requisitado por um rico senhor para ir em expedição à África procurar seu irmão desaparecido há dois anos quando fora à procura das minas do rei Salomão .No trajeto , na chegada e na permanência dos "homens das estrelas" naquele lugar inóspito, acontece todo tipo de empecilhos e aventura que torna esse livro delicioso de se ler. Eu simplesmente amei.

  24. 5 out of 5

    gia

    One of the works that helped inspire Indiana Jones, the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, and lord knows what all else, King Solomon's Mines may not be a staggering work of fiction, but it nonetheless shaped a lot of literature (and films!) in the decades to come. With that in mind I embarked on Allan Quatermain's journey to the titular mines, although they feature primarily at the end of the journey. In fact, all together I'd have to say the experience was a bit episodic: first there's the almos One of the works that helped inspire Indiana Jones, the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, and lord knows what all else, King Solomon's Mines may not be a staggering work of fiction, but it nonetheless shaped a lot of literature (and films!) in the decades to come. With that in mind I embarked on Allan Quatermain's journey to the titular mines, although they feature primarily at the end of the journey. In fact, all together I'd have to say the experience was a bit episodic: first there's the almost-deadly journey through the desert, the almost-deadly entanglements with the natives, the almost-deadly experience in the mines(I don't think anything I've said here will spoil the book for anyone, but I won't elaborate further). For me that made this a book I read in chunks over a couple of weeks, rather than the kind of novel I devour as hard and fast as I can (see also The Hunger Games, Storm Front and the other Dresden Files books, etc). And that's perfectly fine! The novel is a great adventure and a lot of fun, and even if it's not Faulkner or James Joyce or whatever, it's not entirely mindless pulp, either. Quatermain is at once a lover of Africa and even of Africans but at other moments shows his entirely period-appropriate sense of white superiority in an inconsistent mash that nonetheless feels very human-- as do all of the rest of the characters, except perhaps Gagool. Excellent read. I'd pick up another Quatermain novel next, if I didn't have a stack of other items on my to-do list!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Yasiru (reviews will soon be removed and linked to blog)

    Perhaps my earliest enjoyable memory of reading (at first in translation). The exotic, other-worldly descriptions here- of places and people both, were utterly entrancing, and the presence of the map and the key it presented for the plot's progression kept my young self fascinated (and not because there were mountains on it called Sheba's Breasts... at least I hope not- there's some Freudian imagery now that I think about it). It's my feeling sometimes that I've come to overuse the term 'mythic' Perhaps my earliest enjoyable memory of reading (at first in translation). The exotic, other-worldly descriptions here- of places and people both, were utterly entrancing, and the presence of the map and the key it presented for the plot's progression kept my young self fascinated (and not because there were mountains on it called Sheba's Breasts... at least I hope not- there's some Freudian imagery now that I think about it). It's my feeling sometimes that I've come to overuse the term 'mythic' for being too lazy to explain that I mean central patterns and symbols which deal with the unknown in narrative form (if that attempt at succinct explanation makes sense), but one must invoke it here again- the scenery, references (contemporary curiosities and mysteries oftentimes; like Dickens or Conan Doyle were apt to provide) and even subplots and the bases for conflicts have a definite mythic potency about them. I'm curious to know how King Solomon's Mines holds up now that I claim more years, and am infinitesimally displaced (which way, who can rightly say?) from whatever wisdom I would have had on first reading. What remains in memory most clearly is the spirit of adventure which gained a noble aura for being undaunted by the strange setting. The protagonists were resourceful, and honourable- often in that old mould of men possessed of patriarchal responsibility (a better face, and the more acceptable one to show in fiction, than that of privilege, which is very modestly incidental in such cases), though they do actually learn and develop from their journey and the interactions and relationships they have with the natives, instead of the story being a uniform series of chances for the party to show off a European's or Englishman's sense of what is right and proper. This humanist lean is what transcends the historical setting of dealings in Africa chronicled here and makes this a deserving classic of adventure literature. There seems to be the idea that this book is somehow dated or possibly harmful somehow because it was written with a colonial mindset, but anyone who reads it will see that the attitudes Haggard displays through his characters, whatever their skin colour, are not those that would uphold colonialism, but are likely exactly those that were to pioneer the way towards better in freedoms and equality among races. It's a very forward-looking novel in this sense of attitudes, as befitting an adventure. This is very clearly a product of its history, and to deny such literature when its outlook is so commendable is a revisionist attempt to deny historical advancement for the blemishes rather than anything that can 'undo' racism. We are better for knowing what historical perceptions were, not because we would stupidly emulate them, but to know to avoid missteps as we venture into the future's unknowns. As a story for children there's the case that some identification and drawing of simplistic distinctions is unavoidable, but again, the novel's display of attitudes conducive to changing what are admitted as wrong and objectionable impressions, and moreover the very human and often noble characterisation of some of the natives themselves, can only suggest good caution for a reader to make up their mind. Certainly one to try reading again.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chloe

    I was really torn about how to rate this book. On the one hand, it was a fun and thrilling adventure tale, the likes of which have been setting fire to the minds of young children with visions of exotic and far-flung locales for centuries. I can well imagine the delight with which this ripping yarn was received by the readers of the 1880s. On the other hand, there is just so much omnipresent racism throughout the entire story that I found it endlessly distracting and offputting. King Solomon's Mi I was really torn about how to rate this book. On the one hand, it was a fun and thrilling adventure tale, the likes of which have been setting fire to the minds of young children with visions of exotic and far-flung locales for centuries. I can well imagine the delight with which this ripping yarn was received by the readers of the 1880s. On the other hand, there is just so much omnipresent racism throughout the entire story that I found it endlessly distracting and offputting. King Solomon's Mines is written as a personal recounting of a journey taken by three Englishmen into Deepest Darkest Africa. Narrated by Allan Quartermain (yes, the same Allan Quartermain from Alan Moore's League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, evidently this was the source book for that character), a big game hunter who meets up with Sir Henry Curtis and Captain Good who are searching for Curtis' brother, who went missing while looking for the fabled mines of the title. Quartermain just happens to have a map of the way to the mines so the trio decide to set off in search. What follows is a rollicking good adventure. There are parched throats in the desert, freezing nights atop mountains, perilous encounters with the "dark savages" of the land, the toppling of a tyrannical king in a mythical African nation that reminded me of nothing so much as Wakanda, the homeland of the Marvel superhero Black Panther, witches, exquisite works of archeological wonder and enough diamonds to fund at least eight more genocides in modern Africa. Basically, this book had everything short of the kitchen sink (though the traveler's would likely have appreciated the immense convenience of one). Were it not for Haggard's persistant racism and harping on the dangers of miscegenation, I would have likely rated this higher. As is, it's still worth a reading as long as one takes it as a product of the times in which it was written.

  27. 5 out of 5

    S.Ach

    If your favourite genre is "Action and Adventure", your all-time favourite book is Stevenson's "Treasure Island", you swear by "Indiana Jones" and "Temple Run" finds its icon in your mobile screen, this is THE book for you. You will find everything that a good adventure story should have - a valiant group of people with strong moral and determination to indulge in all kinds of hunts - treasure, wild animals, witch (?), etc, ancient marauding tribal folks, tribal sacrifices, tribal attack, tribal If your favourite genre is "Action and Adventure", your all-time favourite book is Stevenson's "Treasure Island", you swear by "Indiana Jones" and "Temple Run" finds its icon in your mobile screen, this is THE book for you. You will find everything that a good adventure story should have - a valiant group of people with strong moral and determination to indulge in all kinds of hunts - treasure, wild animals, witch (?), etc, ancient marauding tribal folks, tribal sacrifices, tribal attack, tribal war, some more tribal stuff, tribal love, tribal treachery, (and did I mention "tribal"?) elephants, diamonds, mountains, wild-animals, deserts, near-death experiences, actual death experiences, everything. This is the papa of all 'Adventure Stories'. Or, so they say.

  28. 5 out of 5

    aljouharah altheeyb

    وانتهيت من هذه الرواية الرائعة، المُغرقة في التفاصيل، المحبوكة بدقة حتى لتشك بأنها من وحي الخيال ! القصه تدور حول الأصدقاء الثلاثة الذين اتفقو للسفر إلى أفريقيا للبحث عن أخ السيد هنري الذي رحل منذ سنتين للتنقيب عن كنوز سليمان عليه السلام المخبئة خلف صحراء الموت .. هذه المغامرة التي يبدأونها تُقدم لهم كمية كبيرة وغير متوقعة من المُفاجئات والأحداث الغريبة ! قصة جميلة جداً وتستحق أن تُقرأ ككل آداب الرحلات

  29. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    This is a 3.5 star for me, the middle portion really dragged on quite a bit but besides that I really enjoyed this novel.

  30. 4 out of 5

    George (BuriedInBooks)

    Wow this book was awesome! King Solomon’s mines is a classic which has been on my to read list for a while and I finally got round to it. I have a physical copy as well as a copy on my kindle which made it easier for me. Kings Solomon’s Mines was written by H. Rider Haggard and was first published in 1885. The main protagonist of the book is Allan Quatermain. Allan is a hunter and adventurer who is employed by Sir Henry Curtis with John Good as Royal Navy Captain. They set out to find Henry’s Wow this book was awesome! King Solomon’s mines is a classic which has been on my to read list for a while and I finally got round to it. I have a physical copy as well as a copy on my kindle which made it easier for me. Kings Solomon’s Mines was written by H. Rider Haggard and was first published in 1885. The main protagonist of the book is Allan Quatermain. Allan is a hunter and adventurer who is employed by Sir Henry Curtis with John Good as Royal Navy Captain. They set out to find Henry’s brother and the Mines of King Solomon which are legend for their diamonds. What follows is a classic adventure novel set in Africa and full of interesting characters and locations. I have to give King Solomon’s Mines the whole five stars because of the quality of the story, characters and locations. I was sad when it ended and won’t be forgetting this story for a while! Thanks for reading everyone! Please check out my blog at buriedinbooks1999.wordpress.com

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