Supergirl: Being Super (Supergirl: Being Super #1-4) - Download Free Ebook Now
Hot Best Seller

Supergirl: Being Super (Supergirl: Being Super #1-4)

Availability: Ready to download

She's super-strong. She can fly. She crash-landed on Earth in a rocket ship. But for Kara Danvers, winning the next track meet, celebrating her 16th birthday and surviving her latest mega-zit are her top concerns. And with the help of her best friends and her kinda-infuriating-but-totally-loving adoptive parents, she just might be able to put her troubling dreams--shattere She's super-strong. She can fly. She crash-landed on Earth in a rocket ship. But for Kara Danvers, winning the next track meet, celebrating her 16th birthday and surviving her latest mega-zit are her top concerns. And with the help of her best friends and her kinda-infuriating-but-totally-loving adoptive parents, she just might be able to put her troubling dreams--shattered glimpses of another world--behind her. Until an earthquake shatters her small town of Midvale...and uncovers secrets about her past she thought would always stay buried. Now Kara's incredible powers are kicking into high gear, and people she trusted are revealing creepy ulterior motives. The time has come for her to choose between the world where she was born and the only world she's ever known. Will she find a way to save her town and be super, or will she crash and burn? Caldecott Honor and Eisner Award-winning writer Mariko Tamaki (This One Summer) and Eisner Award-nominated artist Joëlle Jones (Lady Killer) combine forces for this incredible coming-of-age tale! This is the Girl of Steel as you've never seen her before. Collects the limited series Supergirl: Being Super #1-4.


Compare

She's super-strong. She can fly. She crash-landed on Earth in a rocket ship. But for Kara Danvers, winning the next track meet, celebrating her 16th birthday and surviving her latest mega-zit are her top concerns. And with the help of her best friends and her kinda-infuriating-but-totally-loving adoptive parents, she just might be able to put her troubling dreams--shattere She's super-strong. She can fly. She crash-landed on Earth in a rocket ship. But for Kara Danvers, winning the next track meet, celebrating her 16th birthday and surviving her latest mega-zit are her top concerns. And with the help of her best friends and her kinda-infuriating-but-totally-loving adoptive parents, she just might be able to put her troubling dreams--shattered glimpses of another world--behind her. Until an earthquake shatters her small town of Midvale...and uncovers secrets about her past she thought would always stay buried. Now Kara's incredible powers are kicking into high gear, and people she trusted are revealing creepy ulterior motives. The time has come for her to choose between the world where she was born and the only world she's ever known. Will she find a way to save her town and be super, or will she crash and burn? Caldecott Honor and Eisner Award-winning writer Mariko Tamaki (This One Summer) and Eisner Award-nominated artist Joëlle Jones (Lady Killer) combine forces for this incredible coming-of-age tale! This is the Girl of Steel as you've never seen her before. Collects the limited series Supergirl: Being Super #1-4.

30 review for Supergirl: Being Super (Supergirl: Being Super #1-4)

  1. 5 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    Mariko Tamaki, author of the much celebrated This One Summer, works with artist Joelle Jones (Lady Killer) to fill out the origin story for Supergirl, something along the lines of American Alien by Max Landis, the aw shucks story of Clark Kent in Kansas. The point of this volume is to show that Kara Danvers, aka Supergirl, is first and foremost a teen girl, living in a Midwestern community, with friends and family and every day challenges. Kara Danvers arrives, as we know, from Krypton, and from Mariko Tamaki, author of the much celebrated This One Summer, works with artist Joelle Jones (Lady Killer) to fill out the origin story for Supergirl, something along the lines of American Alien by Max Landis, the aw shucks story of Clark Kent in Kansas. The point of this volume is to show that Kara Danvers, aka Supergirl, is first and foremost a teen girl, living in a Midwestern community, with friends and family and every day challenges. Kara Danvers arrives, as we know, from Krypton, and from the first she has powers, her parents know she has powers, and they try to keep all this secret, but as we also know, she will eventually need to reveal her powers at some point as the need arises. So that happens a few times, but the Danvers family manages—at this point at least—to largely keep Kara’s powers a secret. This is also (because it is happening in the present moment) an immigrant story; the Danvers couple see a spaceship crash on their land, they find a girl arriving who needs to be protected, and they just accept her and raise her. That’s the point, they are us and she is us (or, just a regular ol' teenaged girl) and we are a heartland people who accept children when they come to this country (yes, that is political commentary here). Tamaki opens with Kara and her best friends, Dolly and Jen, ready for the fall yearbook picture, stressing about healthy eating, diet, exercise. Her mom and dad are just regular working class folks, Dolly a lesbian of color, Jen like Kara a cis-gendered white girl and a track star. It's the sixteenth anniversary of her coming to Earth, sweet sixteen. Emotional trauma is the heart of the second and third issues, and this works because great artist Joelle Jones gets to bear the brunt of the communication of the emotions: fewer words, more images, subtle tones, great colors. So the heart of the volume is here, Kara learns from it. Recovering from the aftermath of the Midvale earthquake and the loss I’m not spelling out, Kara meets another alien from Krypton, named Tan-On (that we are inclined not to like, though he IS cute), and investigates the suspicious behavior of Coach Stone, whom she follows to an underground bunker stamped Lexcorp (gulp!). Nothing really original here, a little disappointing, actually, but the art from Joelle Jones, the color from Kelly Fitzpatrick, the sharp dialogue/writing from Tamaki, Kara’s friend connections, the nice and believable parents, all these elements make it work. I think the very best thing about this particular series (which may or may not have a second volume) is the remarkable art of Jones, which is awesome, dramatic when it has to be, especially in the flying and other action sequences, and is also controlled and intimate, in the quiet small town friend sequences, when it has to be. The dialogue is not snarky like Papergirls or even Jillian Tamaki's Supermutant Magic Academy, but it is still really good. The writing is on the whole really good, better than Tamaki’s Hulk. It feels fresh, re-invigorating a teen superhero comic with strong (but not infallible, possibly confused) girl energy. Highly recommended.

  2. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Finally a Supergirl book I can FULLY recommend. Why is that so hard to find? Supergirl is a lot about Kara trying to find her place. Nothing new there. The book even opens up with "Where do I start? Oh yeah, same old story." and it knows it can't reinvent the wheel so instead it polishes it and makes a fun as heck read for one of our favorite female badasses! Kara going through learning who she is. Not in the sense of being a alien, which she gathers already. She's trying to find her place among Finally a Supergirl book I can FULLY recommend. Why is that so hard to find? Supergirl is a lot about Kara trying to find her place. Nothing new there. The book even opens up with "Where do I start? Oh yeah, same old story." and it knows it can't reinvent the wheel so instead it polishes it and makes a fun as heck read for one of our favorite female badasses! Kara going through learning who she is. Not in the sense of being a alien, which she gathers already. She's trying to find her place among her peers, her family, her purpose. This is a origin story similar to American Alien. We get to know Kara more than seeing big epic fights with her unstoppable powers. This is about a 16 year old girl (maybe? She's not sure when she landed one earth in earth years) but she's ready to try her best to adjust. When loss and depression hit maybe this teenage girl's super powers won't do her any good. Good: The art is great. At first I thought the faces looked odd but once I got into the groove loved how everything looked and flow. The scenes in the skies and such are breathtaking. I also thought the dialog, for the most part, was sharp and playful. The banter was current and the characters, especially supporting cast, all did well. I really enjoyed Kara's internal thoughts and hearing how she deals with problems was refreshing. Bad: The two flaws I saw was sometimes the dialog was pretty bad. It wasn't often but the outburst from Kara's friend could have been written better. Also the pacing is way off. FAR too short. This needed atleast 2-3 more issues to really hit all the right notes. Overall this is a really enjoyable fun origin story about Kara (more so than "Supergirl") and I'm very much okay with that. I think Mariko is a very solid writer, and she was just a bit rushed in production but I recommend this one to any fans of superhero stories with a lot of heart!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Darinda

    An introduction to Supergirl. Kara is a typical teen girl living a normal life with a couple of best friends and parents who love her. She also has a secret... she has superpowers. This comic has a good story, interesting characters, and great artwork. A fun and entertaining read, and a nice update to Supergirl. Supergirl: Being Super contains issues #1-4. Chapter 1: Where Do I Begin - An introduction to Kara and her family and friends. Chapter 2: Hold On! - Kara loses someone close to her, plus An introduction to Supergirl. Kara is a typical teen girl living a normal life with a couple of best friends and parents who love her. She also has a secret... she has superpowers. This comic has a good story, interesting characters, and great artwork. A fun and entertaining read, and a nice update to Supergirl. Supergirl: Being Super contains issues #1-4. Chapter 1: Where Do I Begin - An introduction to Kara and her family and friends. Chapter 2: Hold On! - Kara loses someone close to her, plus her powers are acting flaky. Chapter 3: Who Are You? - Kara meets a fellow Kryptonian. Chapter 4: Who I Am. - Kara must fight back to save her friend, and herself. I received a digital copy of this book from DC Comics and Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Julie Ehlers

    I didn't have high expectations going in, but this was excellent! I want to know what happens next RIGHT NOW.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    I thought this was an alternate-universe Supergirl, but by the time I got to the end I decided it was perhaps a rebooted origin story (because it's very much an origin, with a few unresolved plots). But I'm still not sure. DC continuity is soooo horribly broken. Anywho, this is a nice story. It creates a good supporting cast for the young Kara and acts very much as a coming-of-age story, where the general teenage feelings of alienation are made all the more blatant by the fact that Kara is a lite I thought this was an alternate-universe Supergirl, but by the time I got to the end I decided it was perhaps a rebooted origin story (because it's very much an origin, with a few unresolved plots). But I'm still not sure. DC continuity is soooo horribly broken. Anywho, this is a nice story. It creates a good supporting cast for the young Kara and acts very much as a coming-of-age story, where the general teenage feelings of alienation are made all the more blatant by the fact that Kara is a literal alien. This book shines the most when it looks into the life of Kara and her friends (and it drags the most when we get multiple pages of superheroic conflict). I'd definitely read more of this version of the character.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    I've never been a fan of Supergirl - I don't actually like any of the Kryptonians - and yet, I enjoyed this origin story of the usually-bubbly blonde hero. She's not so bubbly in this one. She's a questioning sixteener, trying to figure out who she is and why her body feels weird and why she's so tired all the time. She has two best friends, loses one because that's how these stories are supposed to go, apparently, and begins to remember everything she'd forgotten in the last eight years. Standar I've never been a fan of Supergirl - I don't actually like any of the Kryptonians - and yet, I enjoyed this origin story of the usually-bubbly blonde hero. She's not so bubbly in this one. She's a questioning sixteener, trying to figure out who she is and why her body feels weird and why she's so tired all the time. She has two best friends, loses one because that's how these stories are supposed to go, apparently, and begins to remember everything she'd forgotten in the last eight years. Standard teen stuff, regardless of which planet you're from. I am not sure why these people in...Indiana? I think Indiana...don't know who Superman is and I'm not sure why it sounds like he's just arrived on the scene when obviously, LexCorp knows full well who he is and what his powers are, etc. But whatever. I didn't delve too deeply into things because this is Supergirl and I was just happy to not hate the story. This Tamaki woman may be on to something and I hope she and Jones continue to team up for this series.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Logan

    Pretty good! Heard this one was really good, so I ordered the trade as soon as I saw it on the previews and I'm glad I did! So the story is origin story of sorts for Kara, since DC feels the need to reset the origins of Superman related characters every few years. This one has Kara growing up in a small town similar to Smallville as strange things start happening around town and something is effecting Kara's powers. I enjoyed the story for the most part; coming of age stories always have a warm Pretty good! Heard this one was really good, so I ordered the trade as soon as I saw it on the previews and I'm glad I did! So the story is origin story of sorts for Kara, since DC feels the need to reset the origins of Superman related characters every few years. This one has Kara growing up in a small town similar to Smallville as strange things start happening around town and something is effecting Kara's powers. I enjoyed the story for the most part; coming of age stories always have a warm place with me. This book had a similar vibe to Superman: Earth One, Volume 1 which I really enjoyed (although its not as good, but it's a strong second). But overall I really enjoyed the story, I finished it in almost one sitting, which just shows how easy and enjoyable the writing was for me! The Artwork was also pretty good, not the best but I felt it suited the story well. Only negative I can really say is the book does tend to lean more towards the teenage girl crowd and not hopeless nerds like me Lol But I was still able to enjoy it quite a bit!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Christy

    Petition for Mariko Tamaki to write all the comics and Joelle Jones to draw all the comics. Fantastic through and through.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

    I really wanted to like this. I love Tamaki’s Hulk book and Joelle Jones’ art is always a gift. However, I just couldn’t connect to anyone in this book. The tone just didn’t work for me. I couldn’t get attached to Kara’s plight or her grief. The dialogue for the teenagers reminded me of what happens when adults try to write young adult lingo. It’s always just strange to me and never makes much sense. Dolly’s lines like “assprick” and “buttturd” (or something like that) were just odd and took me I really wanted to like this. I love Tamaki’s Hulk book and Joelle Jones’ art is always a gift. However, I just couldn’t connect to anyone in this book. The tone just didn’t work for me. I couldn’t get attached to Kara’s plight or her grief. The dialogue for the teenagers reminded me of what happens when adults try to write young adult lingo. It’s always just strange to me and never makes much sense. Dolly’s lines like “assprick” and “buttturd” (or something like that) were just odd and took me out of the book. I couldn’t connect to the attempt to write their response to losing their friend, either. Dolly’s “Don’t die ever, okay?” speech felt stifled and awkward. I’m not far enough from my teenage years for me to think this is odd to me because I’m old. It just didn’t work for me. I can see this worked for other people, though and I’m glad. There wasn’t enough of the plot with the coach for me to latch onto, either. The only aspect I really connected with was Kara’s relationship with her parents and I wanted more of that. That being said, I liked that this was a fairly diverse book. I loved he art. Jones’ work was gorgeous as usual. So, I’m honestly surprised I didn’t like this because I adore Tamaki’s Hulk book. Anyway, onward!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    Although the character has been around for six decades in comics and other media, the mainstream became very aware of who Kara Zor-El was in TV’s Supergirl, which first aired in 2015. The show took its time to find its footing, but has managed to give the superheroine her own identity that doesn’t have to associate with her more popular cousin, something that Mariko Tamaki and Joëlle Jones have taken to heart when creating Supergirl: Being Super, their four-issue miniseries from last year which Although the character has been around for six decades in comics and other media, the mainstream became very aware of who Kara Zor-El was in TV’s Supergirl, which first aired in 2015. The show took its time to find its footing, but has managed to give the superheroine her own identity that doesn’t have to associate with her more popular cousin, something that Mariko Tamaki and Joëlle Jones have taken to heart when creating Supergirl: Being Super, their four-issue miniseries from last year which is finally released as a graphic novel. Please click here for my full review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    The original Supergirl was invented in the early 60s. It was still the time of silly, light stories, and her stories, set in an orphanage were light humor, and odd adventures, such as her dressing up like a fairy godmother to entertain kids, or her boring a hole through the earth so people could look through it and see the leaning tower of Pisa. I grew up on this Supergirl, and though that it was odd that she would have to be reinvented. But in looking at the old stories, though I loved them as a The original Supergirl was invented in the early 60s. It was still the time of silly, light stories, and her stories, set in an orphanage were light humor, and odd adventures, such as her dressing up like a fairy godmother to entertain kids, or her boring a hole through the earth so people could look through it and see the leaning tower of Pisa. I grew up on this Supergirl, and though that it was odd that she would have to be reinvented. But in looking at the old stories, though I loved them as a kid, they seemed odd, a time of orphanages, and having to be perform to be adopted seemed much older than the 60s, more like something out of an Little Orphan Annie musical. So, I shouldn't have been too surprised that someone has decided that she needs to be updated. Because, she does. And though I love the CW TV version of her, I find this retelling to be well written, interesting, and well rounded. The basic facts are still the same. She is still Kara from Kyrpton, and her parents put her on a ship to escape when she was a young child. Only in this version, she isn't discovered by Superman, but by a rural couple, and raised by them, rather the way Superman was, if his parents had not trusted the government. Like the Superboy of old, this Supergirl has to hide her powers from everyone but her family. She has to hold back in sports. And this works, as she grows up to have good friends, and a good life. Of course, something has to happen to make her become a hero, and something does happen, but that is the story you have to read. The pacing was good.  The friends of Supergirl seemed fully formed. She has a lesbian best friend, and it is just part of the story. This first collection of the first four books of the series held my attention, was fun to read, and makes me wonder if they will continue the series from here, now that they have established her as a character. I would recommend this to people who remember the original Supergirl and what to see a well done retelling, as well as people who have never heard of Superman's cousin, and wonder what all the fuss is about. Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest reivew.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Die beste Supergirl-Origin-Geschichte aller Zeiten! Wir erleben Kara als Teenager, der sich fremd in seiner Umgebung (=auf der Erde) fühlt, was für Teenager nichts ungewöhnliches ist; nur das Kara eben tatsächlich fremd ist, weil sie von Krypton kommt, also ein waschechter Alien ist. Die Superkräfte spielen keine herausragende Rolle in diesem Auftaktband, es geht um Freundschaft, Umgehen mit Verlusten, seinen eigenen Weg gehen, kurzum: es geht ums Erwachsenwerden. Die Geschichte ist sehr emotional Die beste Supergirl-Origin-Geschichte aller Zeiten! Wir erleben Kara als Teenager, der sich fremd in seiner Umgebung (=auf der Erde) fühlt, was für Teenager nichts ungewöhnliches ist; nur das Kara eben tatsächlich fremd ist, weil sie von Krypton kommt, also ein waschechter Alien ist. Die Superkräfte spielen keine herausragende Rolle in diesem Auftaktband, es geht um Freundschaft, Umgehen mit Verlusten, seinen eigenen Weg gehen, kurzum: es geht ums Erwachsenwerden. Die Geschichte ist sehr emotional und sympathisch erzählt und die wunderbare Artwork von Joelle Jones passt perfekt dazu. Aus dem Leben eines normalen Teenagers … naja, nicht wirklich:

  13. 4 out of 5

    Artemis

    I never liked Supergirl. Not before 'Supergirl: Being Super', anyway. I always saw her as nothing more than Superman's distaff counterpart - young, pretty, blonde, something for heterosexual Superman fanboys to ogle at while the power fantasy they can imagine themselves as was being realized (what some of them take away from the Man of Tomorrow. I know there is much more to him than that, as a character and a symbol. Still not a fan). At least Batgirl has the dominant characteristic of being smar I never liked Supergirl. Not before 'Supergirl: Being Super', anyway. I always saw her as nothing more than Superman's distaff counterpart - young, pretty, blonde, something for heterosexual Superman fanboys to ogle at while the power fantasy they can imagine themselves as was being realized (what some of them take away from the Man of Tomorrow. I know there is much more to him than that, as a character and a symbol. Still not a fan). At least Batgirl has the dominant characteristic of being smart and computer-savvy, and she has undergone various changes, identities, revamps, remodeling, and interpretations since her creation. Supergirl/Kara is... young, uncertain, a typical teenager, a sexualized underaged girl, an unintentional poster child for eating disorders, a petite DC heroine constantly living in her cousin's ginormous Holy Trinity shadow, and a weak link who is always male-dependent, taken advantage of, depowered, turned evil, and killed in storylines. Woman in Refrigerator applies to her in magnitudes. I maintain that 'Supergirl Vol. 1: The Girl of Steel' is one of the worst comics I've ever read - and that was meant to entice new readers to the character, and attract fans of the CBS show, which I like okay. Other than that, Supergirl never worked for me. Until now. After waiting nearly a year for 'Supergirl: Being Super' to be published in trade in my country, my hopes were not to be dashed. I'm glad I gave this superheroine another chance. Written and drawn by the female team Mariko Tamaki and Joëlle Jones, 'Supergirl: Being Super' is a sweet, heartfelt, wonderfully-realized coming-of-age story about a teenage girl who can fly and possesses super strength and speed. This origin - which manages to be unique among hundreds of others about Supergirl over the years - has her not really remember her time on Krypton before it blew up when she was a child, nor does she remember that she is an alien. She does not yet know of Superman's existence, much less her connection to him. This works on a myriad of levels to her story's advantage. Kara Danvers is confused, but assertive and proactive. She philosophizes about beginnings and what they mean to different people. Other than at birth, when does one's life begin? No, this blonde, relatively-sheltered girl is not Rapunzel. 'Being Super' is about Kara finding herself, wondering who she really is and why she is the way she is - and what her destiny could be. What is her purpose in this "ordinary" world, as an extraordinary girl? So she is like any other teenager. She also gets literally explosive zits. No blood splatter since this is for a relatively young audience. Kara lives and works on a farm, where there is plenty to lift and plenty of land to go running and jumping in. Aside from her adoptive parents, the other two people who form the backbone of her life are Dolly, a plump, queer POC, and Jen, an aspiring athlete and health geek, her best friends from school. They are lovely, distinct, and they leap off the pages, as Kara can leap off her roof and fly into the air, contemplating the universe. Female friendships are the central focus of 'Supergirl: Being Super', and it is beautiful to see in a modern superheroine comic, especially from DC. Kara's parents do not allow her to reveal her secrets - how she was found in a space pod on the farm eight years ago, and the nature of her powers, which are a mystery even to her - to anyone, not even to Dolly and Jen. Issues of trust, love and loyalty are among the major themes of the book. Tamaki is a fantastic writer - she knows all about human emotions and struggles, troubled thoughts and anxieties, plus the need for support from other people. These apply to none-human characters as well. The plot is written to explore the stages of adolescence; of discovering what the real world is like. There is angst, but it is sophisticated, all-encompassing angst. It is executed with the care and craft of a seasoned storyteller, who is serious about characters most of all. There are lessons included here for the teenage demographic, such as: Dealing with loss and grief; even a superpowered being can't save everyone; no one is immune to tragedy; dealing with guilt; being there for your friends; listening to and loving your kind, caring parents who have sacrificed everything for you; anti-war; anti-greed and hunger for power over disadvantaged and innocent foreigners; anti-revenge; moving on in life; never running away with a strange boy just because he is handsome and has a tragic past. The usual good stuff. I wasn't sure about the artwork at first - with the lines and pockmarks on the characters' skin, also Kara is still super-skinny; all elbows and pencil waist (lucky for that super-metabolism!) - but it grew on me. It is colourful and vibrant, as a comic about the Girl of Steel should be. And this comic is definitely about her. 'Supergirl: Being Super' is fun and super-moving, a fresh new treat for both old and new fans. Supergirl receives as much respect as Superman does. Being super - what does that mean? Being good with your powers and gifts? Saving lives? Being a good friend? Being good for your family? For the world? It can mean a great many things. Kara Danvers - not quite Supergirl yet - like all teens, is still trying to figure it out. Final Score: 5/5

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    This is Kara and her life with her friends. Focused on friendship and family from start to end. It's fun, emotional and interesting to keep turning the page. Loved my time with this story.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    Really fun origin story—great writing and art! Check out my full review at Forever Young Adult.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Wing Kee

    Supergirl Earth One. World: Fantastic art that's expressive and full of character. This is a character story and the art really helped bring the emotions to the reader. The world building is also fantastic. Being non canon the creative team had a lot more leeway to play with this world and it's similar and different enough to be it's own thing. Solid. Story: Fantastic 2/3 of the way and a weak final act. That being said this is a really well written story and the tone and character personal voic Supergirl Earth One. World: Fantastic art that's expressive and full of character. This is a character story and the art really helped bring the emotions to the reader. The world building is also fantastic. Being non canon the creative team had a lot more leeway to play with this world and it's similar and different enough to be it's own thing. Solid. Story: Fantastic 2/3 of the way and a weak final act. That being said this is a really well written story and the tone and character personal voices were fantastic. The origin we get here for Kara is fresh and different and the focus on her personal emotional discovery is great. I don't want to say more but it's a great read and a great character book. The third act when the superhero aspects come into play a bit rushed and though it's still good was a bit jarring from the intimate character drama we got before. It's still very so good. Characters: The heart of this story and Kara is the center. Kara is complex, real, empathetic and full of personality, all these thought bubbles gave her a very distinct personal voice. The friends and people she is surrounded with is also well done and fully formed. The emotions were real and the people were real making this fantastical tale grounded. This should have been called Supergirl Earth One and I absolutely want a sequel. Onward to the next book! *read individual issues*

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    Yes to all of it. The illustrations, the text, the storyline. Yes to it all. Kara has super powers and was "adopted" by her family who knows of her abilities and keeps her pod hidden in the barn. She's a runner on the track team but has to keep her speed and strength in check. Readers meet her two best friends and dive into teenage life-- until an earthquake hits and she loses one of her friends. In the grief and mourning, it emerges that evil powers (and one track coach) are trying to use her a Yes to all of it. The illustrations, the text, the storyline. Yes to it all. Kara has super powers and was "adopted" by her family who knows of her abilities and keeps her pod hidden in the barn. She's a runner on the track team but has to keep her speed and strength in check. Readers meet her two best friends and dive into teenage life-- until an earthquake hits and she loses one of her friends. In the grief and mourning, it emerges that evil powers (and one track coach) are trying to use her and other Kryptonians power, but she will not go down as easily. Kickass heroine, check. Humor and teenage life, check. Super-ness, check.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    The Supergirl story we deserve... Kara Danvers is an average teenage girl with a very extraordinary secret: she has unexplained, superhuman physical abilities and only a foggy memory of a childhood trauma. She was adopted by Jeremiah and Eliza Danvers out in the small town of Midvale, raised as their daughter. But when a freak earthquake interrupts a school track meet, Kara's life is disrupted permanently as she is forced to seek answers to her mysterious past as Kara Zor-El. This origin story ta The Supergirl story we deserve... Kara Danvers is an average teenage girl with a very extraordinary secret: she has unexplained, superhuman physical abilities and only a foggy memory of a childhood trauma. She was adopted by Jeremiah and Eliza Danvers out in the small town of Midvale, raised as their daughter. But when a freak earthquake interrupts a school track meet, Kara's life is disrupted permanently as she is forced to seek answers to her mysterious past as Kara Zor-El. This origin story takes cues from Clark Kent's humble upbringing, giving Kara her own hero's journey. However, this version is infused with 90% more humanity than the formulaic history of Superman was. Kara faces not only the anxieties of a modern day teen but also her own existential crisis as it becomes clear she's different from the people around her. And, like all great origin stories, there are true consequences that propel the hero forward. Tamaki brazenly allows the plot to unfold as blunt beats naturally take their course. She puts Kara through a great deal of suffering and shock while giving Kara completely human reactions. And, like various iterations of Superman and Supergirl's respective origin stories: it is the threats of the past and the ghost of Krypton's mistakes that they must first take on before their true story can begin. If there is one flaw in this story it is the weak background to our ultimate villain, likely designed in the image of General Zod. But even the weak physical villain doesn't detract from the real struggle of girl vs. self as Kara comes to terms with her new normal and the secrets that have been plaguing her her entire life. A great Supergirl read for anyone looking for a version with real heart and care to it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jena

    A supergirl book that is actually good?? It's more likely than you think. I actually really enjoy Supergirl, but most of her solo series or featured stories tend to be, well...what's the nice way of saying "horribly written?" This is a simple origin comic introducing Kara to Rebirth and to new readers. What sets it apart from a sea of other Supergirl origin stories is that this isn't the bubbly, lighthearted Kara we're used to - instead, this Kara is quite somber and is dealing with the sudden de A supergirl book that is actually good?? It's more likely than you think. I actually really enjoy Supergirl, but most of her solo series or featured stories tend to be, well...what's the nice way of saying "horribly written?" This is a simple origin comic introducing Kara to Rebirth and to new readers. What sets it apart from a sea of other Supergirl origin stories is that this isn't the bubbly, lighthearted Kara we're used to - instead, this Kara is quite somber and is dealing with the sudden death of a loved one on top of the normal teenage angst of her changing body and trying to decide who she wants to be. Some of the extraneous DC stuff didn't really make a whole lot of sense (When does this take place? Superman is active in Metropolis but hardly anyone knows who he is? Yet LexCorp knows enough about Kryptonians to know what their powers are?) and there are some cliche story beats that you would expect to hit in a book like this, but overall it was a great read. Mariko Tamaki's writing pairs perfectly with Joëlle Jones' art style for a fast-paced, entertaining look at Kara. This is a fantastic little book that will appeal to new fans as well as old.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Annise Blanchard

    I'm not a huge fan of superhero comics, but I adore the artists for this comic and DAMN. I am so glad I read this! I love Dolly, and think we may be the same person (as this panel shows ;) ) : But overall this comic was really amazing. The story was clear, interesting, and has me hooked. Quick favorite! <3

  21. 5 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    There aren't many Superfamily stories that interest me but I'll read anything Mariko Tamaki is working on. This is Supergirl's origin story, and it's very similar to the Clark Kent Superman origin story but Tamaki's excellent understanding of characters and ear for dialogue make this much more interesting than any Superman origin I've ever read. It does have a bit of a CW drama feel but it really works with the story, not against it. I would recommend this for anyone looking for a new superhero t There aren't many Superfamily stories that interest me but I'll read anything Mariko Tamaki is working on. This is Supergirl's origin story, and it's very similar to the Clark Kent Superman origin story but Tamaki's excellent understanding of characters and ear for dialogue make this much more interesting than any Superman origin I've ever read. It does have a bit of a CW drama feel but it really works with the story, not against it. I would recommend this for anyone looking for a new superhero title, Supergirl fans looking for a new origin story, people who enjoy female protagonists that actually talk and behave like actual women as opposed to men's fantasies, modern Archie fans who wish Betty was Kryptonian.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Anna (Bananas!)

    The story was pretty stereotypical but was saved from being dull by the wonderful characters. Every one was complex and interesting and real, especially Kara’s best friends and her dad. Plus there was an LGBT character - SPOILER - who didn’t suffer a horrible fate. Hooray! END SPOILER. There was also realistic dialogue, even if it seemed slight (that’s how people often actually talk), including in emotionally complex scenes. The author found a way to say more with less and convey emotions with s The story was pretty stereotypical but was saved from being dull by the wonderful characters. Every one was complex and interesting and real, especially Kara’s best friends and her dad. Plus there was an LGBT character - SPOILER - who didn’t suffer a horrible fate. Hooray! END SPOILER. There was also realistic dialogue, even if it seemed slight (that’s how people often actually talk), including in emotionally complex scenes. The author found a way to say more with less and convey emotions with simplicity, which was frequently touching.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jenn Estepp

    4 1/2. Probably my favorite comic that I’ve read in a while - certainly of the superhero variety. I’ve very little experience with any of the Supers, at least in book form, but it was really fun and I look forward to more.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Christiana

    I mean, I would read more of these.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Yet another Supergirl reboot disappoints. Super angsty narration attempts to remind us that Kara is a just teenager while the generic comic book plot with a secret underground headquarters/research lab reminds us that we really don't really need this sort of disposable story.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Vince

    Mariko Tamaki is a killer writer, and when she writes a coming of age story she knocks it out of the park. I loved this, this is my first Supergirl story and I couldn't have picked a better one to read. I'll make this a more detailed review after release, but trust me, if you won't want to sleep on this.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Joelle

    I had not read any Supergirl books going into this, but I'm familiar with the basics of her story and other characters and things (Lexcorp, etc.) through TV, movies, and Superman. I like the art and the voice in this one. I really enjoyed the teen angst and friendship angle. Kara is just trying to figure out who she is, just like her human friends. And then stuff gets real when bad stuff starts to happen and she has to decide quickly who she is and what she stands for. The teen stuff might be a I had not read any Supergirl books going into this, but I'm familiar with the basics of her story and other characters and things (Lexcorp, etc.) through TV, movies, and Superman. I like the art and the voice in this one. I really enjoyed the teen angst and friendship angle. Kara is just trying to figure out who she is, just like her human friends. And then stuff gets real when bad stuff starts to happen and she has to decide quickly who she is and what she stands for. The teen stuff might be a bit much for the patience of younger kids in my classes, but I would definitely recommend it to 12+. (I read an ARC ebook from NetGalley.)

  28. 4 out of 5

    The Lost Dreamer

    I have fallen in love with this comic book. This version of Kara Zor-El is fresh, fun, imaginative and thrilling. The plot tastes like a version of Smallville for Supergirl, but the characters (Kara's friends and parents) are simply so beautifuly depicted, that the book becomes much more than "another teen-superheroine". It has nothing to do with The CW's TV series, but those who watch it will probably love these comics. Also special mention to Joelle Jones's drawing: full of tension and emotion I have fallen in love with this comic book. This version of Kara Zor-El is fresh, fun, imaginative and thrilling. The plot tastes like a version of Smallville for Supergirl, but the characters (Kara's friends and parents) are simply so beautifuly depicted, that the book becomes much more than "another teen-superheroine". It has nothing to do with The CW's TV series, but those who watch it will probably love these comics. Also special mention to Joelle Jones's drawing: full of tension and emotion in almost every page. Some panels are pure masterpieces. I've loved all the details in the girl's bedrooms and Kara's body language. Simply marvelous.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    I'll admit, I come to Supergirl through the TV show, not through the comics, so while I have some familiarity with the story, there's a lot of background that I'm missing. That said, it didn't hamper my enjoyment in the slightest. This version of Supergirl is fantastic. I love her attitude, I love her mom, I love her friends. I love how real she feels, even with superpowers. I also love the artwork. I love how people look like people and aren't particularly cookie-cuttery. There's also a lot of fa I'll admit, I come to Supergirl through the TV show, not through the comics, so while I have some familiarity with the story, there's a lot of background that I'm missing. That said, it didn't hamper my enjoyment in the slightest. This version of Supergirl is fantastic. I love her attitude, I love her mom, I love her friends. I love how real she feels, even with superpowers. I also love the artwork. I love how people look like people and aren't particularly cookie-cuttery. There's also a lot of fantastic facial work in this. It's all feels really grounded, which allows for the super to shine through. All in all, I thought this was great.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    Heck yeah! I was never really interested in Superman, and my only real experience with Supergirl was the movie from 1984 (though I was OBSESSED with it in first grade). I was wondering whether or not I'd really dig this beyond its having two of my favorite creators. But the wonderteam of Tamaki and Jones makes this the best new superhero story arc I've read since Ms. Marvel. There's a real story here. The art is striking. I need the next volume to come out NOW. Many thanks to DC and NetGalley for Heck yeah! I was never really interested in Superman, and my only real experience with Supergirl was the movie from 1984 (though I was OBSESSED with it in first grade). I was wondering whether or not I'd really dig this beyond its having two of my favorite creators. But the wonderteam of Tamaki and Jones makes this the best new superhero story arc I've read since Ms. Marvel. There's a real story here. The art is striking. I need the next volume to come out NOW. Many thanks to DC and NetGalley for the advanced copy of this book!!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.