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Set in the glittering art deco world of a century ago, MEM makes one slight alteration to history: a scientist in Montreal discovers a method allowing people to have their memories extracted from their minds, whole and complete. The Mems exist as mirror-images of their source ― zombie-like creatures destined to experience that singular memory over and over, until they expi Set in the glittering art deco world of a century ago, MEM makes one slight alteration to history: a scientist in Montreal discovers a method allowing people to have their memories extracted from their minds, whole and complete. The Mems exist as mirror-images of their source ― zombie-like creatures destined to experience that singular memory over and over, until they expire in the cavernous Vault where they are kept. And then there is Dolores Extract #1, the first Mem capable of creating her own memories. An ageless beauty shrouded in mystery, she is allowed to live on her own, and create her own existence, until one day she is summoned back to the Vault.


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Set in the glittering art deco world of a century ago, MEM makes one slight alteration to history: a scientist in Montreal discovers a method allowing people to have their memories extracted from their minds, whole and complete. The Mems exist as mirror-images of their source ― zombie-like creatures destined to experience that singular memory over and over, until they expi Set in the glittering art deco world of a century ago, MEM makes one slight alteration to history: a scientist in Montreal discovers a method allowing people to have their memories extracted from their minds, whole and complete. The Mems exist as mirror-images of their source ― zombie-like creatures destined to experience that singular memory over and over, until they expire in the cavernous Vault where they are kept. And then there is Dolores Extract #1, the first Mem capable of creating her own memories. An ageless beauty shrouded in mystery, she is allowed to live on her own, and create her own existence, until one day she is summoned back to the Vault.

30 review for Mem

  1. 4 out of 5

    Elise (TheBookishActress)

    You are never going to read another novella like this, and that is okay. With an incredibly weird conceptand a fantastic exploration of character, this novella makes for such an interesting read. In a world where memories - primarily traumatic memories - can be extracted and turned into their own people, what should their rights be? When most of the Mems become nothing but the trauma they’ve experienced, why is our lead different? What makes her so? [This novella is one of the most philosophical You are never going to read another novella like this, and that is okay. With an incredibly weird conceptand a fantastic exploration of character, this novella makes for such an interesting read. In a world where memories - primarily traumatic memories - can be extracted and turned into their own people, what should their rights be? When most of the Mems become nothing but the trauma they’ve experienced, why is our lead different? What makes her so? [This novella is one of the most philosophical I’ve ever read, maybe.] The thing I liked about this, specifically, is that MEM doesn’t try to force an easy answer to the questions it raises. Because Bethany Morrow knows there isn’t one to all of these questions. Is it better to remove trauma or live with it? How can we judge those who made one choice or another in their struggle to remove trauma? How can we know that people who seem to be acting on memory alone are truly not their own people? And perhaps it seems like an odd message, but our pain, our fear, our hurt, our ability to deal with the above - they make us who we are. We don’t need to be grateful for our pain, nor should we be, but learning to cope with it is part of what makes us human. This is reflected through the protagonist, a Memory herself, and through almost every side character. I will say I was not a fan of the romance - there’s a bit of a power dynamic between them I wasn’t a fan of. But I think Bethany Morrow handles it quite well, to the point where it’s challenged multiple times, which made me feel a bit better. And let’s be real: it was so interesting. On the whole, this is a compelling, interesting story about people, with all our flaws, and asks us to question our future. Blog | Goodreads | Twitter | Youtube

  2. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    A solid novella about a world in which people can extract their memories and turn them into people. These people, called Mems, get locked away in the secluded Vault to relive that singular experience until they wither and pass away. This story follows Dolores Extract #1, the first Mem who can create memories of her own. While Dolores Extract #1 has a few allies in the facility that creates Mems, she later learns that she risks getting reprinted, which entails losing all of her autonomy, her idea A solid novella about a world in which people can extract their memories and turn them into people. These people, called Mems, get locked away in the secluded Vault to relive that singular experience until they wither and pass away. This story follows Dolores Extract #1, the first Mem who can create memories of her own. While Dolores Extract #1 has a few allies in the facility that creates Mems, she later learns that she risks getting reprinted, which entails losing all of her autonomy, her ideas, and herself as a person. We follow her on her journey to negotiate how much she can control, when her life has always been in the hands of somebody else. I enjoyed MEM as a slim tale that poses interesting philosophical questions: how do we address issues of power, ownership, and control in our relationships with others? How far can self-determination advance us when an imbalance in privilege and resources exists from the start? Bethany Morrow creates a realistic protagonist with Dolores Extract #1, who struggles to advocate for herself in a confusing world with the cards stacked against her survival. Morrow ends the novella on a note of empowerment, such that Dolores Extract #1 – who renames herself Elsie – advocates for herself with relative success. Overall, I would recommend this one to those intrigued by the synopsis, those who enjoy science fiction, and those who do not mind a shorter story. I only give it three stars because I feel that I did not develop an emotional connection to any of the characters, likely because of the length of the story. While I found the plot and the characters’ dilemmas and relationships interesting on an intellectual level I did not feel my heart move. Still, I look forward to reading Bethany Morrow’s future work – I think her next project involves YA centering two female black teens, woo – and would be curious to read how others react to MEM.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Fiona

    An interesting and wholly original story, set in a world where the Professor has discovered a way to extract memories from their Sources as wholly separate - if incomplete - beings. Elsie, our protagonist is the one exception to the hundreds of extracted memories and isn't merely a captured moment of time; instead, she's a being with thoughts and memories and opinions of her own. But in this world, memories belong to their owners, and Elsie has just been called back to her Vault... Examining the An interesting and wholly original story, set in a world where the Professor has discovered a way to extract memories from their Sources as wholly separate - if incomplete - beings. Elsie, our protagonist is the one exception to the hundreds of extracted memories and isn't merely a captured moment of time; instead, she's a being with thoughts and memories and opinions of her own. But in this world, memories belong to their owners, and Elsie has just been called back to her Vault... Examining the limits and definitions of personhood, this is a thoughtful novella, that doesn't make the mistake of trying to answer every question it brings up. Instead, we as the readers are simply presented with scenarios and allowed the luxury of our own choices. It's not a fast-paced book, despite it's short length, but it's one I'm sure will be sticking in my brain for much longer than it took to read it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Ridiculously, unfathomably good. For fans of thinky, tense, character-driven, grounded scifi concerned with the nature of humanity, along the lines of NEVER LET ME GO or EX MACHINA. In short, this is the exact kind of story I'm constantly searching for, and Morrow nails it. I'll post a more complete review soon, but for now, PLEASE get this one on your radar.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rincey

    3.5 stars See me discuss this book in my June wrap up: https://youtu.be/z-mkTQwXlQE?t=4m35s

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jerrie (redwritinghood)

    This novella packs a lot into a slim volume. Much in the same vein of “Never Let Me Go” it explores the question of what makes a person. Additionally, though, this book explores memory, how it shapes is, how it helps prepare us for life ahead and what we become without it. I liked the writing style and the early 20th century setting.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Izzy

    I am a memory. Now I suppose I’ll live like one. With that opening sentence begins one of the best stories I’ve read. MEM is a historical speculative fiction novella that presents an interesting world–what if you could extract memories and moments and maintain them as keepsakes of sorts? Pieces of yourself, who look like you, created for a specific reason. At first glance the concept reminded me a lot of Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, which was why I was drawn to this little book. We mee I am a memory. Now I suppose I’ll live like one. With that opening sentence begins one of the best stories I’ve read. MEM is a historical speculative fiction novella that presents an interesting world–what if you could extract memories and moments and maintain them as keepsakes of sorts? Pieces of yourself, who look like you, created for a specific reason. At first glance the concept reminded me a lot of Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, which was why I was drawn to this little book. We meet Elsie, who is the first of a woman named Dolores. However, unlike other MEMs, Elsie is able of creating new memories, so she is fully equipped to live a life as her own self, rather than someone else’s shell. Scientists cannot explain why she is different, and she is content enough with living on her own as a scientific mystery, until her Source asks her to go back to the Vault–the facility where MEMs are stored–so she can be reprinted. What follows is a story that is short, but that packs the perfect amount of philosophy that such a plot needs to sustain itself, and that never leaves any holes. Usually when I read short stories or novellas I feel like I could do with a little more; I find it hard to believe that it’s possible to properly develop fully dimensional characters and an engaging plot in 150, 200 pages. But here comes this author proving me completely wrong, because I thought the length of this story never worked to its disadvantage. If you’re a fan of the book/movie Never Let Me Go, you’ll definitely enjoy this one. I was completely immersed. The author was so, so good at making me feel–everything. Not once was the story trying to force emotions out of me, it just went along with Elsie’s musings and she was such an interesting, dynamic person, I couldn’t help but feel like she was roping me in. By the time we were done, I knew her, and by knowing her I felt like her story affected me in a way that hasn’t happened to me in a while. It’s a book you might read in one sitting, although that proved to be a bit difficult for me. Not because of anything that I found distasteful in the story, but because it constantly prompted me to think. It brings up questions about what is consciousness, exactly, and to what extent does our memory serve us, and every now and again I had to slow down to properly digest this. And also I simply did not want it to end. Finishing it was a bittersweet experience. I won’t be surprised if this ends up making it to my favorites of all time shelf. I need to sit with it for a little more time. For now, however–I can honestly say I absolutely love it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Laura Shovan

    I could not put this book down. Think Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind + Mary Shelley's Frankenstein with a female MC/creation. It is inventive, heart-breaking, full of big ideas about what it means to be human and whether we can own or belong to another person. 💔

  9. 4 out of 5

    Caroline Anna Bock

    A contemplative speculative novel about 'memory extraction' in the early 20th century Montreal. In turns, I found this novel about how the rich and wealthy rid themselves of disturbing memories by having them removed into replicas called 'Mems' an intriguing concept, a thought piece. The evocative setting of Montreal at the turn of the last century, an island in the middle of technological revolution gone slightly awry helped make the novel strange and wonderful-- as did the main character Dolor A contemplative speculative novel about 'memory extraction' in the early 20th century Montreal. In turns, I found this novel about how the rich and wealthy rid themselves of disturbing memories by having them removed into replicas called 'Mems' an intriguing concept, a thought piece. The evocative setting of Montreal at the turn of the last century, an island in the middle of technological revolution gone slightly awry helped make the novel strange and wonderful-- as did the main character Dolores/Elsie a 'Mem,' who is the one Mem more than her memory. I do wish that there were more commentary on race and class (this author even addresses the lack of it in an end note -- it's clearly not the novel she wanted to write). But Morrow has written a very slim novel filled with some big ideas of how personal memory shapes us, even makes us strong, and certainly human. I hope in the future that she may explore historical memory, which seems so lacking in today's political body-- at least in the United States. Kudos to Bethany Morrow! --Caroline

  10. 5 out of 5

    Riley Redgate

    densely packed, thinker’s sci-fi—as lovely and delicate and infinitely capacious as a flower that unfolds forever.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mya

    This slim novel packs a huge philosophical punch. At times it feels a little too blatantly moralistic, but in general the author does a fantastic job of weaving together threads of ethics and empathy into describing the life of an entity that challenges the parameters of the technology that created her. An enjoyable read that dabbles in the historical, the romantic, and the not yet possible.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kira

    *received an ARC for review* I'm not quite sure what I read. I'm sure I liked it, and I'm sure I'm a little confused and need to unpack the story, but this is definitely an intriguing sci fi with a hell of a lot of depth for such a short length.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Y.Z.

    A delightful story with an unusual setting! Trying not to include spoilers, but I really like the meditation on how experiences are nothing without self-reflection. I appreciate the wonderful architectural details too.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Flynn

    I was intrigued to read a story about the fictional handling of the notion of removing unwanted memories, terrain also explored evocatively in "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind." This, unlike that, has the additional difficulty of being told from the point of view of one of the extracted memories, a semi- (or not so semi-) independent entity. It poses challenges for both reader and writer just to grasp how the rules of this world work, and what is at stake for the extracted memory, aka Elsi I was intrigued to read a story about the fictional handling of the notion of removing unwanted memories, terrain also explored evocatively in "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind." This, unlike that, has the additional difficulty of being told from the point of view of one of the extracted memories, a semi- (or not so semi-) independent entity. It poses challenges for both reader and writer just to grasp how the rules of this world work, and what is at stake for the extracted memory, aka Elsie. I felt like I spent a lot of time trying to understand just what was going on, yet the effort did not feel in vain, as it sometimes does in a book when you've had to do that. The writing style is singular; I enjoyed it. I found the story overall elusive and hard to pin down but sensed that was the author's intent, not a flaw. Overall a uniquely enjoyable and hard to classify reading experience.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sabs

    There have been times where I wish I could forget. Imagine if you could, but doing so would result in a living breathing replica of you at that moment? Would your memory last or expire right away? Elsie lasts, and her story is about self-discovery. I'd say more, but think you should dive in without knowing too much. Great debut. I really look forward to what this author produces next. The one thing I found interesting was that while Elsie is black, and the story takes place in the early 1900s, th There have been times where I wish I could forget. Imagine if you could, but doing so would result in a living breathing replica of you at that moment? Would your memory last or expire right away? Elsie lasts, and her story is about self-discovery. I'd say more, but think you should dive in without knowing too much. Great debut. I really look forward to what this author produces next. The one thing I found interesting was that while Elsie is black, and the story takes place in the early 1900s, the author (as mentioned in a note at the end) chose to omit slavery and racism. And yet the Mems are property themselves. I feel there is an alternate world version of this story where those two things are intertwined.

  16. 5 out of 5

    ns510

    In a parallel version of 1920s Montreal, memories can be extracted and encapsulated into Mems. Dolores Extract 1 defies all expectations in that she is an enduring Mem, and able to retain large swaths of memories and formulate thoughts of her own. This is a slim novel, but thoughtful in its explorations of a world such as this, of humanity and what makes a life. #readharder Task 17: a sci fi novel with a female protagonist written by a female author.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Laura Weymouth

    A hypnotic exploration of memory, identity, and what it means to be human, MEM is a book you won't be able to put down, or forget once the last page has been turned. Elsie is a Mem, or extracted memory. Her own first memories are of a lab, where she proved to be exceptional among her fellow Mems. Eventually granted a tenuous sort of freedom, Elsie spends years living in 1920s Montreal, as an oddity and a celebrity, but always, first and foremost, as someone's property. But her recall to the lab a A hypnotic exploration of memory, identity, and what it means to be human, MEM is a book you won't be able to put down, or forget once the last page has been turned. Elsie is a Mem, or extracted memory. Her own first memories are of a lab, where she proved to be exceptional among her fellow Mems. Eventually granted a tenuous sort of freedom, Elsie spends years living in 1920s Montreal, as an oddity and a celebrity, but always, first and foremost, as someone's property. But her recall to the lab after she's grown accustomed to independence throws everything about Elsie and her place in the world into question. This book is a rare treat--the sort of narrative that requires the reader to work to keep up with it. Past and present blur together and everything means *something*. Elsie's narrative voice is stand out--often clinical, due to her upbringing and background, it still shines with a capacity for wonder and Elsie's own unshakable sense of self. The nuanced exploration of what memories are and who we are without them, as well as what makes us human, never panders, never spares the reader's sensibilities, and never flinches from the truth. And the ending. OH, the ending. A perfect, beautiful, and devastating pay off caps this truly remarkable book. One character says of Elsie, "None of us will ever be free of you, even when we're gone," and when you've finished MEM, you're sure to feel the same way. I can't recommend this book highly enough.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    4.5 - loved it!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Leon

    3 1/2 stars. Intriguing story that raises interesting questions: Who are we without our memories and our past trauma? What is the state of consciousness for our worst memories? I could have done without the romance and I didn't particularly connect with any of the characters even though it kept me interested enough to keep reading. A fast read, I suggest you check it out if the premise intrigues you!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alexia Chantel

    MEM is a wonderfully written sci-fi that will have you contemplating what it means to be human. Set in an alternate history of 1920, there is technology that allows people to ‘remove’ any memory they want. That piece of themselves becomes a MEM, an embodiment of that one event that plays over and over. Only, Delores Extract #1 doesn’t act like all the others and has a mind of her own. Delores Extract #1, or Elsie as she named herself, is exploring the world and living her own life with the const MEM is a wonderfully written sci-fi that will have you contemplating what it means to be human. Set in an alternate history of 1920, there is technology that allows people to ‘remove’ any memory they want. That piece of themselves becomes a MEM, an embodiment of that one event that plays over and over. Only, Delores Extract #1 doesn’t act like all the others and has a mind of her own. Delores Extract #1, or Elsie as she named herself, is exploring the world and living her own life with the constant reminder that she is the product of a fragment of someone else’s life. So when she is recalled back to the laboratory, she goes with the knowledge that her existence is soon to be over. But the scientists and nurses she encounters, and the husband of the woman she came from, see Elsie as something more. Morrow’s writing is superb. Her ability to capture the intricacies of Dolores Extract #1’s thoughts and make you feel them along with her, is amazing. This is a quick read at just under 200 pages. If you enjoy a thought provoking sci-fi, you have to pick this book up.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rachel (rachandbooks)

    Very neat concept and good execution! I enjoyed this debut and Morrow is an author I’m going to be keeping up with in the future. 3.5 stars.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kylie

    This book was so interesting and thought provoking. I honestly had a hard time getting into it and found it quite confusing. There is no real introduction into this different world where people can extract memories of trauma to forget about them and I found myself struggling to figure out how everything worked. For about half the book, I was struggling to figure out what the plot line was. In the very beginning we are told about Elsie (a lady named Dolores' first memory extraction). She is the onl This book was so interesting and thought provoking. I honestly had a hard time getting into it and found it quite confusing. There is no real introduction into this different world where people can extract memories of trauma to forget about them and I found myself struggling to figure out how everything worked. For about half the book, I was struggling to figure out what the plot line was. In the very beginning we are told about Elsie (a lady named Dolores' first memory extraction). She is the only memory, or Mem, who can make new memories instead of constantly recreating the extracted memory. For that reason, she has been able to live her own life in Montreal instead of in the Vault. She is recalled to the Vault for an unknown reason. Then a large chunk is Elsie remembering things either in her own life, or Dolores' life when she was still a part of her. We finally figure out the reason Elsie is recalled to the Vault. It is because she is going to be reprinted. So little of the story follows this plot line which made it hard for me, but I realized that's ok. Everything that needed to be told was told. It was sometimes hard for me to figure out what time each part of the book was taking place. There was the present, the past while she was living out in Montreal, when she was first made inside the Vault and before she was extracted when she was still a part of Dolores. I had to always be actively engaged. I really liked Elsie because she questioned everything including her own existence. She was very logical and very much her own person. It broke my heart that she was a memory and she knew she was a memory and her Source wanted to reprint her with another memory. It broke my heart that Dolores' parents did not want to know Elsie because even though she had every single childhood memory that Dolores did, she was not their daughter. To be honest, I think a lot of this book went over my head. I feel like there was a lot of really deep points that I didn't get because I was trying to figure out the plot line, or trying to figure out if that certain part of the story was past or present. I think if I reread the book, I would get a lot more out of it because I would be able to concentrate on those deeper points. I absolutely fell in love with the cover of this book. The dust jacket is a plain white, but underneath is the door to the Vault. I am so used to intricate designs on the dust jackets and plain colors underneath, so this was such a fun surprise. I wanted to add in a few quotes that really struck me as thought provoking: "It was the first time I'd been lied to by a man, that I knew of, and I felt it must mean something. What surprised me most was that while he was the one being dishonest, I somehow was the one made to feel small and uncertain." (pg 37) "The extraction abandoned Dolores to be just as she had been before, unprepared to cope with subsequent traumas, which her father would therefore continue to extract." (pg 92) The first quote made me think about everyday life for me. How it happens every day. People try to cover their lies by making the other person feel like it's their fault. I feel like this was something I already knew, but never put into a thought. The second quote made me look at the book in a different way. By taking away a traumatic experience from someone, you don't give them the opportunity to learn from it. Learn to deal with it and grow into a better person (hopefully) because of it. That is what happened to Dolores. She could never learn to be able to cope with bad things that happen. Elsie understood that and never wanted to have a Mem of her own. I ended up enjoying this book more than I thought I was going to when I first started reading it. I may end up rereading it in the future to get even more out of it because it has such a great message!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Scott TomeWyrm

    "The greatest inventions are not born of necessity," he said. "They are born of pain." When I picked up Mem to read, I thought I was grabbing an easy read that had a fun concept but would ultimately just be one of those books I would finish without gaining much from - I was definitely wrong. The book, though short, is not a simple story. It delves into many philosophical ideas such as what makes us human, how our past memories shape our future selves, how our personal identities can change, the s "The greatest inventions are not born of necessity," he said. "They are born of pain." When I picked up Mem to read, I thought I was grabbing an easy read that had a fun concept but would ultimately just be one of those books I would finish without gaining much from - I was definitely wrong. The book, though short, is not a simple story. It delves into many philosophical ideas such as what makes us human, how our past memories shape our future selves, how our personal identities can change, the societal trends to be better than those who are different, etc but it does so subtly, through the telling of the story. I enjoyed the questions that naturally arose as the story unfolded. The author, Bethany Morrow, does not answer the questions for us but rather allows the reader to ruminate and come to their own conclusions. The story follows a memory, or Mem, that was extracted from a young lady after a traumatic event. This procedure is almost exclusively reserved to the upper classes as they are the only ones who can afford it. Mems typically exist only as the memory removed in a shell of a body with no life or thoughts of their own. This story's main character - Delores Extract No. 1- however, has retained all memories of the original Delores and continues to make more of her own. We follow her as she tries to understand what it means to be human and what the meaning of her existence is. The setting of Montreal in the 1920's gives the book a Decopunk Lite feel to it that I quite enjoyed. It added something extra to the novel and posed the question of "What would the world look like today if such technology actually existed?" Bethany Morrow did not delve into the science behind the technology which allows the reader to focus more on the human aspect of the world she has created. The writing style she used -switching from past memories to current happenings - also increased the questions posed. Where do memories end and reality start? How much of our life do we spend in the past even if only subconsciously? Would we be the same person if we never looked backwards? I feel as this book is one I could return to later on down the road and my take away would be completely different and new questions would arise. I'm definitely looking forward to the day I pick this up again. Fabulous job on your debut novel, Bethany Morrow!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    I really enjoyed Mem and can’t wait to see what Bethany Morrow comes up with next— for being her first book I was completely blown away. Toying with the concept that we are able to extract memories and so live free of them is an intriguing idea; Transparently, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind was my favorite movie in high school and so I am perhaps predisposed to loving the idea of altering one’s own memory, but I still felt like Morrow looked at the idea with a new lens. Additionally, she I really enjoyed Mem and can’t wait to see what Bethany Morrow comes up with next— for being her first book I was completely blown away. Toying with the concept that we are able to extract memories and so live free of them is an intriguing idea; Transparently, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind was my favorite movie in high school and so I am perhaps predisposed to loving the idea of altering one’s own memory, but I still felt like Morrow looked at the idea with a new lens. Additionally, she was able to play with the clone/“extra-self” concept that I have loved in other novels but in a way that felt entirely new. It helps that she is a great writer and has a clear knack for creating accesible and lovable characters in a world just a bit different from our own. If you are looking for a quick and interesting read Mem is the perfect book to puck up.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jayne

    This is definitely a 4 star read for me. The plot sounded truly fascinating and the book itself didn't disappoint. It is focused on a world set in the 1920s where the ability to have your memories extracted is possible, but these memories have a life of their own. It focuses around of of these Memories or MEM's who is very different from the rest. This is a great story, that is beautifully told to question the idea of loss, memories and the ownership of such memories. All in all an intriguing and This is definitely a 4 star read for me. The plot sounded truly fascinating and the book itself didn't disappoint. It is focused on a world set in the 1920s where the ability to have your memories extracted is possible, but these memories have a life of their own. It focuses around of of these Memories or MEM's who is very different from the rest. This is a great story, that is beautifully told to question the idea of loss, memories and the ownership of such memories. All in all an intriguing and interesting story!

  26. 5 out of 5

    P.

    Reading this felt similar to my memory of reading The Intuitionist, which was so long ago I can't remember much about the actual book, but I remember it's black and white cover and that I didn't want to put it down but the prose was so dense and the world it described uncanny so I had to take breaks. Mem is like that - formal, full of ideas, doesn't hand feed you everything, compelling storyline, but it has more hope. A rewarding book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tatiana

    I listened to this audiobook. I think I'll give this book a 3.5. I didn't dislike it but felt like if the book were longer I could've gotten more information about why this character kept making mems. I also am unsure what I'm meant to take away re: the big reveal. Maybe I need more time to think about it but I'm glad there's more historical fantasy in the world!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    This book opens a conversation; I read it with a journal in hand, taking notes. Morrow's wisdom and imagination shine through these characters. She's taught me to see memory and trauma differently. I can't wait to read Bethany Morrow's future work.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jessica // Starjessreads

    4.5 Stars! Such a beautiful and unique story. I loved it. Thank you to Unnamed Press for the free advance copy!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bah Humpug

    I read the arc of Mem and loved it! Set in an alternative art deco world where people can extract memories that exist as mirror-images of themselves. Normally these 'mems' live in a loop of that one memory, but Dolores Extract #1 is different and can live and form her own memories like a normal person. The story is one about existence, love and what it means to be human. A quick and engaging read!

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