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Hellboy Omnibus Volume 1: Seed of Destruction (Hellboy (Omnibus Editions))

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The story jumps from Hellboy's mysterious World War II origin to his 1994 confrontation with the man who summoned him to earth, and the earliest signs of the plague of frogs. Avoiding his supposed fate as the herald of the end of the world, Hellboy continues with the Bureau for Paranormal Research and Defense, fighting alongside Abe Sapien, Liz Sherman, and drafting Roger The story jumps from Hellboy's mysterious World War II origin to his 1994 confrontation with the man who summoned him to earth, and the earliest signs of the plague of frogs. Avoiding his supposed fate as the herald of the end of the world, Hellboy continues with the Bureau for Paranormal Research and Defense, fighting alongside Abe Sapien, Liz Sherman, and drafting Roger Homunculus into his own ill-fated service with the B.P.R.D. This 368-page volume covers Hellboy’s adventures from 1994 to 1997, reprinting Seed of Destruction, Wake the Devil, and “Wolves of St August,” “The Chained Coffin,” and “Almost Colossus,” from The Chained Coffin and The Right Hand of Doom.


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The story jumps from Hellboy's mysterious World War II origin to his 1994 confrontation with the man who summoned him to earth, and the earliest signs of the plague of frogs. Avoiding his supposed fate as the herald of the end of the world, Hellboy continues with the Bureau for Paranormal Research and Defense, fighting alongside Abe Sapien, Liz Sherman, and drafting Roger The story jumps from Hellboy's mysterious World War II origin to his 1994 confrontation with the man who summoned him to earth, and the earliest signs of the plague of frogs. Avoiding his supposed fate as the herald of the end of the world, Hellboy continues with the Bureau for Paranormal Research and Defense, fighting alongside Abe Sapien, Liz Sherman, and drafting Roger Homunculus into his own ill-fated service with the B.P.R.D. This 368-page volume covers Hellboy’s adventures from 1994 to 1997, reprinting Seed of Destruction, Wake the Devil, and “Wolves of St August,” “The Chained Coffin,” and “Almost Colossus,” from The Chained Coffin and The Right Hand of Doom.

30 review for Hellboy Omnibus Volume 1: Seed of Destruction (Hellboy (Omnibus Editions))

  1. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    So two things crossed my mind when I picked up this title. Glad I waited because Hellboy (So far) is complete. So I'll be able to read it all. Second though after finishing this title is why in the blue (or red) hell did I wait so long to read this!?!? So if you don't know anything about Hellboy (how could you not?) He's basically a big devil looking ape-looking dude who joins others who are special to stop the evils of the world. Mostly this volume focuses alot on Nazi's and Ragna Rok. This is b So two things crossed my mind when I picked up this title. Glad I waited because Hellboy (So far) is complete. So I'll be able to read it all. Second though after finishing this title is why in the blue (or red) hell did I wait so long to read this!?!? So if you don't know anything about Hellboy (how could you not?) He's basically a big devil looking ape-looking dude who joins others who are special to stop the evils of the world. Mostly this volume focuses alot on Nazi's and Ragna Rok. This is basically two complete story arcs and then a few side stories that fill in gaps or give short side stories of Hellboy and crew taking down evil. By the end you get familiarized of the world they are in, similar to ours, but a little bit more supernatural (Okay a lot more) and by the end all I kept thinking was "I WANT MORE". Good: The art is fantastic once you get used to it. It really feels like NO other comic out there which is a breath of fresh air. Also, Hellboy is amazing. He's badass, he's funny, he has emotion, but he knows what he must do. I also loved the side crew, as they are all given moments. The fact people also die here, and while not major characters, big enough they come by as a surprise is nice. The story really does well to be mature yet not too brooding or dark. The two arcs feel complete and the side stories are a blast with some great humor but also a lot of lore inbetween. Bad: Some of the dialog is long-winded at times. I also thought the villains weren't all that interesting either. Overall this was great. I'd probably go with a 4.5 because it was so damn fun. Even the slower moments, mostly with the villains, couldn't stop me from finishing this 300+ page book in 2 days. Overall it's fantastic and can't wait to go deeper into the world of Hellboy!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    There is something so seductive about he work of Mike Mignola and Hellboy himself (I cannot be the only one with board games and a reboot of the film franchise around the corner). And finally my wishes have been answered - the collected stories are finally coming out in Omnibus editions. I have long since been follow Hellboys antics and adventures however making sense of the various stories - their interwoven references and the suspicion that a far longer story is being slowly played out all mean There is something so seductive about he work of Mike Mignola and Hellboy himself (I cannot be the only one with board games and a reboot of the film franchise around the corner). And finally my wishes have been answered - the collected stories are finally coming out in Omnibus editions. I have long since been follow Hellboys antics and adventures however making sense of the various stories - their interwoven references and the suspicion that a far longer story is being slowly played out all meant either being incredibly patient or spending a fortune, Now I no longer need to worry about either. Like the amazing Plague of Frogs finally I have something meaty to set stuck in and read. Yes I will have be patent as not all the editions have been printed yet but they are on their way although I am someone intrigued by the idea that the longer stories are part of the omnibus editions while the one shots and shorter stories have their own parallel omnibuses coming out as well. the question is how much of my book shelves am I going to have to clear to proudly show them all (and what do I do with the books I clear) on the quandary. Anyway the books are not for everyone with their highly stylised artwork however once you are a few pages in it all seems so natural and the story just pulls you in. I have several of the books that make up this first edition however I am still amazed at what new treasures and joys I find in reading these pages. Now I have to just distract myself till the next one comes out.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Roy

    How good was this. I really enjoyed the Hellboy mythos and world. Great story lines, action and amazing characters. This contained a couple of volumes and some short stories. They all really continued and overall story arc, with great background information on the characters ( good and evil) as well combine perfect amounts of history. The artwork was really quite unique. I had been told that some people consider it too simiplistic. However, I feel like that it personifies Hellboy perfectly. My o How good was this. I really enjoyed the Hellboy mythos and world. Great story lines, action and amazing characters. This contained a couple of volumes and some short stories. They all really continued and overall story arc, with great background information on the characters ( good and evil) as well combine perfect amounts of history. The artwork was really quite unique. I had been told that some people consider it too simiplistic. However, I feel like that it personifies Hellboy perfectly. My only very small critique would be that occasionally the dialogue would be a little long ( not a huge problem here. Its not like Snyders dialogue issues). Definitely recommend this to everyone who reads and doesnt read graphic novels.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. It’s a bit hard to not have heard of this giant red ape-like creature. His presence alone invades the atmosphere and his charisma steals the show. And to turn him into the world’s greatest paranormal investigator too? He’s easily a character that has left a huge mark in our pop culture and is here to stay. Although a bit underrated, Hellboy has his fair share of lore to share with us and it is one that will please a lot of horror and mystic fans You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. It’s a bit hard to not have heard of this giant red ape-like creature. His presence alone invades the atmosphere and his charisma steals the show. And to turn him into the world’s greatest paranormal investigator too? He’s easily a character that has left a huge mark in our pop culture and is here to stay. Although a bit underrated, Hellboy has his fair share of lore to share with us and it is one that will please a lot of horror and mystic fans. His now completed comic book has given birth to a couple of spin-offs and is now being released in this perfectly-ideal omnibus editions to collect Mike Mignola’s award-winning stories in a chronological order perfect for readers. This first volume collects Seed of Destruction (Volume 1), Wake the Devil (Volume 2), and the stories “Wolves of St. August”, “The Chained Coffin” and “Almost Colossus” from The Chained Coffin (Volume 3). How exactly does Hellboy‘s saga begin? In this first omnibus the story begins by throwing readers back during the World War II era where a special Nazi team led by Rasputin conduct a strange summoning that ultimately leads to the birth of a baby Hellboy in a church in Britain. While the Nazis believe their plans have failed, Rasputin claims that he has initiated the end of the world. For almost half a century, this demon-child who was taken in by Professor Bruttenholm, grows to be an agent of the Bureau for Paranormal Research and Defense (B.P.R.D.) in New York. Tagged along with Liz Sherman (a woman with pyrokinetic abilities) and Abe Sapien (an amphibious man), this team investigate strange happenings and uncover the truth behind them while discovering themselves and their place in the world. The lore and the characters are where all the praise should be redirected to. With an underlying touch of Lovecraftian mythology, this story draws upon the mystical world to recreate its own air of horror and mystery. With various references to iconic mythologies and characters, Mike Mignola sets up his world in a basin of strange and ugly creatures that constantly harass Hellboy in his unrestrained and untroubled behaviour. Its especially the style and manner that each threat is approached that poignantly mesmerizes you. While it isn’t exactly an easy-to-dive-in series, it does rapidly capture your heart with all the charming and short dialogues, as well as the brutal and fun action sequences by Hellboy. As fascinating as it is to learn about the Ogdru Jahad, frog-monsters and vampires, it is how Hellboy will deal with them that makes this so fun. It is worth mentioning that the artwork is not something that will please everyone. The style is perfect for Hellboy and grows on you, to the point where it quickly becomes easy for reader to associate it to this series. It is really heavy on shadows and on rough character designs, and rarely focuses on emotions and details. The creepy and edgy designs help in fact to convey the eerie and creepy mood that emanates from many of the settings featured in this story. The transitions aren’t smooth either, and is axed more of frames of key moments in order to let readers imagine the sequence and fill the gap with their own touch of creativity. But with dialogues that are so poetic and that often sound like satanic incantations, as well as snappy one-liners, readers aren’t ever really left to their own. If there’s one thing that I’m happy about, it is the fact that the main series is complete and that they are now being recollected into these omnibuses. If I had read the first volume alone (Seed of Destruction), I would have heavily questioned its reputation since it is far from enough to understand why Hellboy is such an iconic character. In this omnibus, it is much easier for fans to appreciate every characters development and the overall world-building that is set up. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  5. 5 out of 5

    Adam Spanos

    Near the end of World War II, the evil Rasputin summoned a creature from another world -- a little red demon baby. And so starts Mike Mignola's distinctly offbeat "Hellboy Volume 1: Seed of Destruction and Wake the Devil," two interconnected action-factory stories with a bright-red demon as its anti-hero. Mignola happily crams this rather brief tale with Lovecraftian horrors, mythic demons, a cursed mansion, a vampire in an old castle, and a truly malevolent villain who wants to destroy the world Near the end of World War II, the evil Rasputin summoned a creature from another world -- a little red demon baby. And so starts Mike Mignola's distinctly offbeat "Hellboy Volume 1: Seed of Destruction and Wake the Devil," two interconnected action-factory stories with a bright-red demon as its anti-hero. Mignola happily crams this rather brief tale with Lovecraftian horrors, mythic demons, a cursed mansion, a vampire in an old castle, and a truly malevolent villain who wants to destroy the world. Hellboy himself is a classic anti-hero -- despite his red skin, bulky body and sawed-off horns, he's very human in attitude, with an understated love for his friends and his adoptive father. Throughout these stories he's faced by hints of what he truly is and what he's expected to become by the infernal players, but his good heart won't have it. And his snappy wit ("Insolent beast! Troglodyte!" "Big talk for a guy with no pants") only makes him more lovable.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mitchell Kukulka

    "We are what we are, and we have our paths to travel." I've had a few friends recommend the Hellboy books to me over the years, so I was expecting some solid entertainment from the series. What I wasn't expecting was a work of art that seamlessly blends a smorgasbord of literary and mythological influences with its own masterfully realized world. I'm overjoyed that the whole damned series is being recollected just in time for new readers like myself to be exposed to some of the most effortlessly gr "We are what we are, and we have our paths to travel." I've had a few friends recommend the Hellboy books to me over the years, so I was expecting some solid entertainment from the series. What I wasn't expecting was a work of art that seamlessly blends a smorgasbord of literary and mythological influences with its own masterfully realized world. I'm overjoyed that the whole damned series is being recollected just in time for new readers like myself to be exposed to some of the most effortlessly graceful and impactful art and writing to ever color the pages of comic bookdom.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Saul the Heir of Isauldur

    Solid 4 stars. Very nice art, distinctive style, definitely. The story (or stories) is very much original. I always enjoyed how the color red is underused in the panels so that when Hellboy shows up, he really pops and stands out. He's a very vibrant, bright red that leaps off the page. Absolutely hungry for more. It helps a lot that the Omnibus editions (coming out this year, starting with Volume 1 in May 2018) organize the graphic novels in chronological order, so they make more sense. Overall, Solid 4 stars. Very nice art, distinctive style, definitely. The story (or stories) is very much original. I always enjoyed how the color red is underused in the panels so that when Hellboy shows up, he really pops and stands out. He's a very vibrant, bright red that leaps off the page. Absolutely hungry for more. It helps a lot that the Omnibus editions (coming out this year, starting with Volume 1 in May 2018) organize the graphic novels in chronological order, so they make more sense. Overall, I really liked it!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    Behind a monk who's supposed to be dead, the relics portraying demons caste in stone by memo-americans hide in shadows, and we all miss his words because a portal to another world, another time, opens and some new nightmare bursts forth to end humanity. And to all this Red just sighs, cocks his gun, and fires back into the abyss. This omnibus gathered stories, many of which I've read already, but their arraignment, their updates colors, and their original incredible qualities as stories remind me Behind a monk who's supposed to be dead, the relics portraying demons caste in stone by memo-americans hide in shadows, and we all miss his words because a portal to another world, another time, opens and some new nightmare bursts forth to end humanity. And to all this Red just sighs, cocks his gun, and fires back into the abyss. This omnibus gathered stories, many of which I've read already, but their arraignment, their updates colors, and their original incredible qualities as stories remind me of one important thing: HellBoy is the shit.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    Took me long enough, but I finally started reading Hellboy. Maybe waiting for this omnibus to come out was a good idea. If your like me and not sure where to start with Hellboy, this volume is for you. Dark Horse is not only putting these out faster than most omnibus editions, but these are in reading order too. One reason I never read Hellboy before is because there are SO MANY different volumes it gets messy and confusing. So far I like Hellboy. I've only seen the movie before and I liked it, b Took me long enough, but I finally started reading Hellboy. Maybe waiting for this omnibus to come out was a good idea. If your like me and not sure where to start with Hellboy, this volume is for you. Dark Horse is not only putting these out faster than most omnibus editions, but these are in reading order too. One reason I never read Hellboy before is because there are SO MANY different volumes it gets messy and confusing. So far I like Hellboy. I've only seen the movie before and I liked it, but I'm seeing the comic book is so much better. The comics have a lot of history involved. There are lost of dates, events, and characters to keep track. It reminds me a lot of Fables and League of Extraordinary Gentleman in that way. I like comic books like that though. Mike Mignola has build himself a whole universe which I find impressive. This comic book also has a very Lovecraftian vibe, hence the tentacles on the cover. I can see an influence with Eastern European culture/history, Edgar Allan Poe, Gothic Fiction, H.G. Wells, mythology, and bunch of other stuff that makes this comic enjoyable. I'll be getting the rest of these books. Not sure I'll get the spin-off or not because there are a lot of those too.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chris Carrick

    Omnibus is the best bang for your buck and the perfect starting point. Omnibus is the best bang for your buck and the perfect starting point. Mike Mignola's artwork is amazing. Perfect balance of humor and action as well

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sophia

    Δεν θα πω πολλά. Επος!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Reid

    Basically a perfect comic. We'll be discussing this book on the Living Between Wednesdays Podcast this week.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro Dodds

    One of the GOAT

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    I've read these stories before (included here are the first two arcs plus some side stories, including the one that introduces Roger the Homunculus), so it's only lacking the spark of originality. Everything else is wonderful. Hellboy is a great character, almost always either over it or not even interested enough to care in the first place. He seems to get his rocks off by beating up on mythological creatures and/or Nazis and I think I can get behind that. There's a whole lot of mumbo-jumbo tha I've read these stories before (included here are the first two arcs plus some side stories, including the one that introduces Roger the Homunculus), so it's only lacking the spark of originality. Everything else is wonderful. Hellboy is a great character, almost always either over it or not even interested enough to care in the first place. He seems to get his rocks off by beating up on mythological creatures and/or Nazis and I think I can get behind that. There's a whole lot of mumbo-jumbo that I'm sure will eventually count for something, but it does make me skim a little right now. That's ok, though, more time for the cinematic (such contrast!) images. Can't wait for the next entry.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Joseph R.

    In an attempt to squeeze some more money out of the Hellboy franchise, Dark Horse Comics is republishing the stories in internal chronological order (starting with Hellboy's birth in 1944 and going on to his afterlife in Hell) with a bunch of "Omnibus Editions." The plan is to have four volumes with two side volumes of "short stories," presumably the stories that aren't part of the main story arc of the character, where Hellboy is fated to cause the end of the world but he steadfastly refuses to In an attempt to squeeze some more money out of the Hellboy franchise, Dark Horse Comics is republishing the stories in internal chronological order (starting with Hellboy's birth in 1944 and going on to his afterlife in Hell) with a bunch of "Omnibus Editions." The plan is to have four volumes with two side volumes of "short stories," presumably the stories that aren't part of the main story arc of the character, where Hellboy is fated to cause the end of the world but he steadfastly refuses to. The publishing plan is a little ambiguous since one of the stories in this volume does not advance the main story arc. Still, it's fun to revisit the early stories and since I borrowed this from the library, I don't mind a chance to reread the early stuff. Here's the various stories in this volume... Seed of Destruction--The first Hellboy story arc tells the origin of Hellboy in an attempt by the Nazi's occult branch to get a weapon to win World War II. Hellboy is brought up American paranormal investigator Professor Trevor Bruttenholm, who acts as a father figure. The story arc also tells of Bruttenholm's death when a weird frog-creature attacks him. Hellboy investigates, leading him to the Cavendish Hall, home of an exploring family that's been looking for weird stuff. Turns out they are in league with the unidentified man who summoned Hellboy back during WWII and he wants Hellboy to do his bidding. Not very likely, considering Hellboy's better nature. It's a good origin story though Mignola's style is a little rough compared with more recent work. The Wolves of Saint August--Father Edward Kelley travels to the Balkans and is about to put an ancient chapel back into use. One local shows up and relates a legend about a royal family that was cursed to become werewolves. Then the local turns wolf and kills the priest. The priest is an old friend of Hellboy's. Hellboy comes to investigate along with Dr. Kate Corrigan, a B.P.R.D. researcher who wants more field experience. She gets plenty since the whole village is dead from savage animal attacks. Their investigation brings out what's left of the royal family, causing an exciting fight at the end. The book suffers a little bit from accepting the Edgar Allan Poe version of the Inquisition (i.e. ridiculous and sadistic witch/demon hunters with zero sympathy whatsoever); otherwise I enjoyed it very much. The Chained Coffin--Hellboy stops off in England and revisits the church where he first appeared on earth. Spending the night there, he has a horrible dream about a priest and a nun who tried to save a repentant witch (who was their mother!) from the demon coming to claim her after the witch's death (she's in the chained coffin). The dream turns into a waking nightmare as Hellboy sees the offsprings' battle with Satan, who strongly implies that the witch might be Hellboy's mother. The story is spooky and fills in some holes for Hellboy and the reader. Wake the Devil--A bunch of Nazis who were frozen at the end of World War II are awake again when an American corporate honcho comes to their isolated castle just north of the Arctic Circle. They are all in league with Rasputin, the mad Russian monk who survived his assassination at the dawn of the Russian Revolution. Rasputin thinks he's to usher in a new world and was part of the Nazi project that brought Hellboy to Earth. He has a new scheme to bring about Ranga Rok, involving the resurrection of a Romanian vampire. Hellboy and the B. P. R. D. work to foil his plan. All sorts of characters come into play, like the Baba Yaga, Hecate, Roger the Homunculus, etc., who play larger roles in future stories. Having read just about everything, it's exciting to see them get their start. Almost Collossus--Liz Sherman, firestarter, is dying since she transferred her power into Roger the Homunculus in the previous story. Hellboy and Corrigan hunt for Roger while everyone else frets over Liz at a local facility. Roger gets some backstory and a brother (of sorts) who generates conflict and reflection on bigger issues. The book also has two short promotional stories that introduce Hellboy as a future action hero that are more interesting as an early showcase of the imaginativeness of Mignola. The book ends with the usual assortment of sketches, including early versions of Hellboy, Rasputin, and other characters. Recommended, highly for Hellboy fans (who don't already have the material) or those who haven't tried his stories out yet.

  16. 5 out of 5

    William

    The first Hellboy Omnibus shows its characters taking themselves just seriously enough and the stories being just spooky enough to manage an enjoyable escapist balance that let's Mignola's energetic imagination run rampant. Having backed the Hellboy: The Board Game kickstarter as a fan of Mantic's comic-based Walking Dead game, it was exciting for this new reader to see the (game) pieces falling into place. Recommended for the thrills and the wit and the fervent anti-Nazism.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sohan Surag

    3rd time's the charm, I guess. Read through the trades, read through the Library Editions and now its time to give the Omnibus a shot and boy this was no surprise...its just as wonderful an experience the first time. Although Library Edition was the definitive experience, Mignola's characters and timeless art is the reason why Hellboy is my all time favorite comicbook character and not a dime less charming in the Omnibus format. Always a pleasure. Until the fourth time, adios, Seed of Destructio 3rd time's the charm, I guess. Read through the trades, read through the Library Editions and now its time to give the Omnibus a shot and boy this was no surprise...its just as wonderful an experience the first time. Although Library Edition was the definitive experience, Mignola's characters and timeless art is the reason why Hellboy is my all time favorite comicbook character and not a dime less charming in the Omnibus format. Always a pleasure. Until the fourth time, adios, Seed of Destruction.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sirbriang2

    This is a bargain-priced TPD ($25 cover price for around 359 pages of published content!) of Mike Mignola’s first few Hellboy miniseries. Mignola does a great job of building a weird, paranormal world, despite these being his first attempts at plotting and scripting comics. The art is perfect —- highly stylized, bizarre, and full of character. Hellboy himself doesn’t have much personality in the first few stories, but the mood and the supporting cast are more than enough to balance that out.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Scott Waldyn

    Pulpy, fun, and a little zany with the supernatural. It's like Raymond Chandler and Ivan Reitman's original Ghostbusters had a baby. What really seals the deal is its phenomenal (and perfect) art style. Mike Mignola is truly one of a kind, and this collection is the first volume in a timeless masterpiece of pulpy art.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Freder

    The only weak link in this collection is the scripting by John Byrne on "Seed Of Destruction." I get that Mignola lacked confidence in those early days to do the job himself, but why turn to someone who can't write his way out of a paper bag? Fortunately it only lasted for the one story, and soon we are solid ground.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    I'd put this right up there with "The Dark Knight Returns" as one of the best comics I have ever read! The sorry was quite deep (lots of reading for a comic), love the use of mythology, and the artwork was very ominous.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Federico Kereki

    This book deserves a double reading: one for the Lovecraftian (with a touch of pulp fiction) story, and other just for the almost impressionistic art!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Brett

    Dialogue was a bit off but mignola's art is something else entirely.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kurt Zisa

    Great collection of the first Hellboy books. Remastered and crisp artwork throughout with fantastic concept art and never before seen tidbits at the end. A must have for any Hellboy completionist.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Hassan

    Excellent collection of an excellent comic (can we call Hellboy a "classic" now?).

  26. 4 out of 5

    James Hyman

    Very very interesting...

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lizzy Walker

    Review for Monster Librarian forthcoming.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Pturingan

    Finally took the plunge into the Hellboy universe with this newly released Omnibus edition. Big chunky volume with a lot story and great artwork, definitely well worth your money.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Doug Chase

    The fun weirdness of Hellboy from the beginning of the series. I’m looking forward to the subsequent volumes.

  30. 5 out of 5

    James

    Nice to have this as an omnibus collection.

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