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Characters from the DCU cross paths with characters from the pop-up imprint DC's Young Animal in this epic crossover event. So what happens when these astoundingly original realms and their unbelievable inhabitants collide? The answer--Milk Wars! The World's Greatest Heroes meet the motley misfits of the Doom Patrol! The Dark Knight Detective confronts the madness of Mother P Characters from the DCU cross paths with characters from the pop-up imprint DC's Young Animal in this epic crossover event. So what happens when these astoundingly original realms and their unbelievable inhabitants collide? The answer--Milk Wars! The World's Greatest Heroes meet the motley misfits of the Doom Patrol! The Dark Knight Detective confronts the madness of Mother Panic! The Amazon Princess braves the extradimensional weirdness of Shade, the Changing Girl! And the Avatar of the Green takes on the strange science of Cave Carson and his Cybernetic Eye! All to save the Multiverse from the homogenizing horror that is Retconn! Can these astonishing individuals put their differences aside and cut through the chaos that threatens to overwrite their very identities? Or will this history-making meeting end in world-shattering mayhem--or worse? Find out in DC/Young Animal: Milk Wars, brought to life by masterminds Steve Orlando and Gerard Way and a constellation of accompanying creators, including ACO, Jody Houser, Ty Templeton, Cecil Castellucci, Mirka Andolfo, Jon Rivera, Langdon Foss, Dale Eaglesham and Nick Derington!


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Characters from the DCU cross paths with characters from the pop-up imprint DC's Young Animal in this epic crossover event. So what happens when these astoundingly original realms and their unbelievable inhabitants collide? The answer--Milk Wars! The World's Greatest Heroes meet the motley misfits of the Doom Patrol! The Dark Knight Detective confronts the madness of Mother P Characters from the DCU cross paths with characters from the pop-up imprint DC's Young Animal in this epic crossover event. So what happens when these astoundingly original realms and their unbelievable inhabitants collide? The answer--Milk Wars! The World's Greatest Heroes meet the motley misfits of the Doom Patrol! The Dark Knight Detective confronts the madness of Mother Panic! The Amazon Princess braves the extradimensional weirdness of Shade, the Changing Girl! And the Avatar of the Green takes on the strange science of Cave Carson and his Cybernetic Eye! All to save the Multiverse from the homogenizing horror that is Retconn! Can these astonishing individuals put their differences aside and cut through the chaos that threatens to overwrite their very identities? Or will this history-making meeting end in world-shattering mayhem--or worse? Find out in DC/Young Animal: Milk Wars, brought to life by masterminds Steve Orlando and Gerard Way and a constellation of accompanying creators, including ACO, Jody Houser, Ty Templeton, Cecil Castellucci, Mirka Andolfo, Jon Rivera, Langdon Foss, Dale Eaglesham and Nick Derington!

30 review for DC/Young Animal: Milk Wars

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    This was the first time I've felt Gerard Way has met the weirdness of Grant Morrison's Doom Patrol series head on. It felt like an extension of that run. I think the difference is that the story is not only weird but coherent for the first time, and really, quite simple. An evil corporation called Retcon has brainwashed the world in various scenarios throughout each one shot through the power of milk. It not only does a body good, but also whitewashes the mind. I felt they really captured the sp This was the first time I've felt Gerard Way has met the weirdness of Grant Morrison's Doom Patrol series head on. It felt like an extension of that run. I think the difference is that the story is not only weird but coherent for the first time, and really, quite simple. An evil corporation called Retcon has brainwashed the world in various scenarios throughout each one shot through the power of milk. It not only does a body good, but also whitewashes the mind. I felt they really captured the spirit of those early 90's Vertigo comics with this crossover. Way also uses this to introduce some major changes to the Doom Patrol. If you like weird superhero comics, give this a whirl. You don't even to have read the previous Young Animal books. Received a review copy from DC and NetGalley. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    When the first issue of the Milk Wars came out I grabbed it out of curiosity but wasn’t really anticipating much. We’re in the middle of DC’s great Metal, White Knight, and Doomsday Clock stories. But once I read the first issue I was amazed by the depth and meta commentary to such a degree that it has to be said DC is going through somewhat of a renaissance as of late (well the weird copycat new heroes they just came out with are still up in the air for a moment, but I digress...). Despite the d When the first issue of the Milk Wars came out I grabbed it out of curiosity but wasn’t really anticipating much. We’re in the middle of DC’s great Metal, White Knight, and Doomsday Clock stories. But once I read the first issue I was amazed by the depth and meta commentary to such a degree that it has to be said DC is going through somewhat of a renaissance as of late (well the weird copycat new heroes they just came out with are still up in the air for a moment, but I digress...). Despite the duel titles of each of the five parts this story is firmly within the Young Animal imprint as most the stories revolve around each of its title characters. So all this to prepare you: it’s weird. The story itself is about a inter-dimensional “reality estate” corporation called Retcon that is trying to homogenize earth to sell off. The first part introduces everything, next three gets all the other characters to the third act, and the last part closes the story. But what makes this story so great is that it has a lot of meta commentary on creativity, sanitation of art, playing it safe, corporations over controlling nature, companies trying to “milk” a property for everything they can, trying to reboot everything, redeeming characters, feminism, and a lot more. Theres all kinds of fascinating pokes at the comic creators own company. In one part a characters cuss words are constantly edited out because it’s a shared title with batman (a general audience title). The main character bemoans this censorship and can’t wait till thing “get back to normal.” In another scene there’s literally a character being sacrificed and “stretched” to a cross with the “DC” logo on the nails being hammered in. The ending is also serves as a sort of jolt of creativity to open up new horizons. This whole story was weird and surprisingly layered. A lot of thought and creativity went into this to tell readers something about art and creativity. Every part isn’t perfect (multiple writers) but the beginning and end were very strong. For the shear thought and execution I’ll give it a five for me

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    Hell, after finishing this I'm astonished any mainstream comic book publisher had the guts to go ahead with this story. It is, in some ways, a criticism of most of the big money makers in this pretty small industry. At the same time, it gladdens my heart to see DC's Young Animal line embrace what made Vertigo great at its height. They set out to tell a good story. The story has a message, especially in the first and fifth installments, but above all this is a good story. You want to read a tale wh Hell, after finishing this I'm astonished any mainstream comic book publisher had the guts to go ahead with this story. It is, in some ways, a criticism of most of the big money makers in this pretty small industry. At the same time, it gladdens my heart to see DC's Young Animal line embrace what made Vertigo great at its height. They set out to tell a good story. The story has a message, especially in the first and fifth installments, but above all this is a good story. You want to read a tale where you get an idea of how homogenized comic book characters could become if the corporate bean counters had their way? This is it. This tale takes on the concept of franchises, fan fiction, and everything that ties both fan fiction and franchise IP together. And, it does so without gratuitous sex and violence. I'm not a prude but sometimes those two are used as easy vehicle to get in satire, or for shock value (yeah, you Mark Millar, and arguably Garth Ennis). So, what I'm saying in brief is- Read This.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Wing Kee

    To love 'Milk Wars' is to fully embrace the manifesto of the Young Animal line. World: The art is beautiful, from Quietly's covers to the multiple artists for each 5 books in the series, it is a visual feast of the weird, odd, quirky and the other. The art is not normal, the biggest example being the Shade issue, it's different and the art really informs the odd and unorthodox nature of the event, it's a visual feast. The world building, where do I start? It's a meta textual, fringe, middle finge To love 'Milk Wars' is to fully embrace the manifesto of the Young Animal line. World: The art is beautiful, from Quietly's covers to the multiple artists for each 5 books in the series, it is a visual feast of the weird, odd, quirky and the other. The art is not normal, the biggest example being the Shade issue, it's different and the art really informs the odd and unorthodox nature of the event, it's a visual feast. The world building, where do I start? It's a meta textual, fringe, middle finger to the established cliches and tropes of the genre and an embrace for the other and the odd. The premise of the world is odd and the main villain is just as much. I am being vague because the world needs to be experienced to fully enjoy it. If you like different this world is it. Story: The story is suppose to be odd, it's suppose to be structured differently and not take cues from what's expected and normal or in the case of this event 'homogenized' this is a celebration of the other, the weird the odd and the different. It's interesting that I read this around the same time of watching Guillermo Del Toro's 'The Shape of Water' because both of these stories have exactly the same meta textual theme and the idea of embracing the weird and the other and it's a beautiful beautiful thing. I don't think this is a spoiler as all advertisement for this crossover has been focused on the three beautiful covers by Quietly and the 'homogenized' Trinity of Milkman Man, Faster Bruce, and Wonder Wife and it's this very over the top hyper focus on that time period that allows for this fantastic story to express it's voice in a very distinct way. Each issue may follow the same theme for 'Milk Wars' but each at it's core is about each of the Trinity and what each archetype represents and it's a call at them. I won't go into each cause that would spoil each Trinity for you but what each stand for is interesting and how it's twisted the most fun. I am rambling and ducking and weaving to avoid spoilers but man I have to much to say if you read the books, it's sooo good. Characters: This series takes existing achetypes and dives deep into what makes them what they are. This is not a look internally like Miller's Dark Knight books but rather a meta and external look at these iconic characters and what their message and image represents and how they are perceived and our reaction as readers. It's interesting and beautifully written. I've not talked about all the Young Animal books cause there's too much to talk about, there's the beautiful realization and embracing of the weird of all these characters and some truly out there concepts that change the status quo of these characters (Shade, Cliff, and Violet get huge status quo changing things). These characters and their depth and the focus on each of them in each issue are the core of the message and manifesto of this 'Milk Wars' and so tied into the story that it would be impossible to have this story without this beautifully weird group of characters. I love this event, it's odd, it's different and embraces the other. If you go into this expecting a manifesto meta book of the odd but still want a normal story structure you have the wrong mindset. If you go in waiting for a brain bending insane illogical all over the place ride that embraces the fringe you will love the hell out of this event. Onward to the next book! *read individual issues*

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    This book's biggest problem is that it's a particularly ill-conceived crossover. You see it's the story of heroes suddenly trapped in a Retconned reality where everything is different. They have to figure that out and break free and then get a Cybernetic-eye telegram from Cave Carson and decide to go fight the Retconn Corporation itself. Oh, and there's always mind-control milk as a major plot element. Innately, that core concept is flawed because none of the authors produce Retconns that are tha This book's biggest problem is that it's a particularly ill-conceived crossover. You see it's the story of heroes suddenly trapped in a Retconned reality where everything is different. They have to figure that out and break free and then get a Cybernetic-eye telegram from Cave Carson and decide to go fight the Retconn Corporation itself. Oh, and there's always mind-control milk as a major plot element. Innately, that core concept is flawed because none of the authors produce Retconns that are that interesting. (The possible exception? Shade/Wonder Woman, which has her being Wonder Housewife.) And the pacing in all the books is horrible: there just isn't enough story to stretch out over the extended comic issues. But the big, big problem is that we see that same stupid, wrung-out story four times!!! The fifth and final issue is better, because it finally resolves the repetitive story, and it has big, big repercussions for Doom Patrol, which makes this an almost must-read for that comic. But it's a painful must-read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Marcela

    As with all things Young Animal, this is spectacularly weird, and definitely not for everyone. But if weird comics are your thing, read the Young Animal titles. Then, if you've got a working familiarity with the currently-active DC Comics superhero roster, come back to this. It's work, and there is a somewhat limited audience that lands in the middle of that Venn diagram, but man oh man, is this worth it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Givens

    I liked this more than the Grant Morrison stories other reviewers are comparing it to, I thought it it held together better and actually made a statement instead of just spiraling around its own references until it's meaningless. But I went into it not knowing any of the Young Animal characters and that was a bad decision, I wasn't invested so the emotional moments and reveals meant nothing to me.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    I don't know if I'm in the target audience or not. Full disclosure, I'm not familiar with any of Young Animal or the current JLA run. So I came in completely cold. And while it did often fascinate me, it didn't really entertain me much beyond that. In fact, a few of the later issues felt like a chore that I had to do rather than being a fun ride.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    DC has decided to go Retro! Well, sort of, in a manner of speaking. Part of the Expanded Multiverse has been "homogenized" by Retconn with the aid of Milkman Man and other transformed super heroes. The Doom Patrol and Cave Carson are some of the semi-forgotten super heroes that join the normal lineup. If you do not mind a bit of silliness, You are likely to enjoy Milk Wars!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    I couldn't force myself to finish this. It's kind of a Grant Morrison writes a silver-age story but gets sidetracked and forgets to have fun with it. It's a very self-aware and meta imagining of the Rebirth DC Universe colliding with the Young Animal imprint. I recommend it only to people who think Seaguy is a game changing work of genius.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    As much as I've been enjoying Gerard Way's Young Animal line, I'm not sold on its first crossover event, which felt too much like repetitive variations on a single theme, and not even an especially original theme. Suspicious milk has turned the big DC heroes into sappy conformist versions of themselves - a vicar Batman, a domesticated Wonder Woman - and only the oddball Young Animal leads can break the spell! Obviously Grant Morrison's Doom Patrol was a lodestone for Way, but whereas up to now h As much as I've been enjoying Gerard Way's Young Animal line, I'm not sold on its first crossover event, which felt too much like repetitive variations on a single theme, and not even an especially original theme. Suspicious milk has turned the big DC heroes into sappy conformist versions of themselves - a vicar Batman, a domesticated Wonder Woman - and only the oddball Young Animal leads can break the spell! Obviously Grant Morrison's Doom Patrol was a lodestone for Way, but whereas up to now he's been feeling like a worthy successor, this reads more like a slightly pallid imitation. Besides, right now it feels like it's pointed in precisely the wrong direction - just look at the cinematic atrocities they've been suffering and it's obvious that the problem isn't that DC's heroes are being stripped of their edge and grit, but that they're being inappropriately swamped in the stuff.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    I did not think this was good as everyone else seemed to think it was. This is like comics pantomime, where the comic wants to so badly be Grant Morrison but isn't. More traditional super hero artists do not help out, nor do they fit here.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    Quality art, sufficiently oddball to fit in with the general Doom Patrol theme and aesthetic and arguably effective as a work of satire, but less so as a work of social commentary for reasons I will get into shortly. Read if you already like Gerard Way's work and feel like being completeist but its not groundbreaking and seems non-essential to the main "Doom Patrol" and other Young Animal series plotlines. If its vital to you to avoid learning any plot points before reading this I suggest you pa Quality art, sufficiently oddball to fit in with the general Doom Patrol theme and aesthetic and arguably effective as a work of satire, but less so as a work of social commentary for reasons I will get into shortly. Read if you already like Gerard Way's work and feel like being completeist but its not groundbreaking and seems non-essential to the main "Doom Patrol" and other Young Animal series plotlines. If its vital to you to avoid learning any plot points before reading this I suggest you pass over the rest of this review. As a work of odd, surreal and occasionally psychedelic scenes and plots this story fits in well as a Doom Patrol work but in my opinion it doesnt fully match the normal series in terms of quality and works a bit too much in cliche territory to be horribly biting. Being an overtly anti-corporate work is commendable and maybe even a bit bold on some level but in a lot of ways due to the execution of the story that criticism isn't especially biting. The plot is strongly meta-textual which does if nothing else put it in the spiritual center of Doom Patrol's approach to story. The basic source of conflict is the use of a product reffered to only as "Milk" to brainwash/sanitize major parts of the DC universe by a transdimensional IP (or in this case "universe buying") corporation to make the comic universe more "sellable" the result of this is "squeeky clean" 50 suburbia re-created version of the DC Trinity; Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman. Batman is instead of a brooding crime-fighter a bat-themed priest rehabilitating (brainwashing) a clan (cult) of tragedy stricken youths into Robinlooking but Howdy Doody-esque "good kids", Superman is made into a "weirdo hunting" flying 50s style milkman called Milkman Man and Wonder Woman into vacuum using (and rather disturbingly 'breastfeeding') pro tupperware hyper-feminine housewife who's duties consist mostly in shopping and taking care of husband and making sure women have the "proper" emotions at all times. As parody figures these versions work, and their existence in a larger narrative sense is good if only as gags that can be noted so that they not be attempted again, but as commentary for the worst impulses of nakedly money grubbing corporate mandates they fall utterly flat. They amount mostly to actual or perceived 50s cliches not to something any real corporation would ask of a comic company because they would never ever sell in the present environment. Perhaps this would have been considered a possible rebranding in the early 70s but these figures are now only disturbing in a funhouse mirror way, not as visions of a horribly future that may come to pass. There is a bit of commentary on the nature of continuity and its ties to corporate mandates, but seeing as this comic takes no firm side on that issue it too is toothless as criticism. Ret Conn (an admittedly fun pun) the evil corporation behind Milk is used as a punching bag and its cult of branding is an on point jab at current mores but its disconnection from the reality of corporate mandates makes any criticism weaker as far as Im concerned. 50s culture is de classe even amongst most conservative persons in the modern US. Cynicism, dark tones, and "complex" character are far and away the most common means of IP for modern corps. The artwork here is fairly impressive and there are good moments peppered throughout but the lack of topicality when its clearly intended marks this book down considerably to me. Good not great. 3 stars.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Megan Farve

    I received a copy of DC/Young Animal: Milk Wars from NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. The premise of this story is that RETCONN, a reality estate corporation, is using mind controlling milk to create a safe and clean version of the DC universe so that they may sell it for profit. In this story you will encounter not only the Doom Patrol, but 50s versions of the Justice League, including Father Bruce (Batman) and Wonder Wife (Wonder Woman). It is hard to tell what fans of the Ju I received a copy of DC/Young Animal: Milk Wars from NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. The premise of this story is that RETCONN, a reality estate corporation, is using mind controlling milk to create a safe and clean version of the DC universe so that they may sell it for profit. In this story you will encounter not only the Doom Patrol, but 50s versions of the Justice League, including Father Bruce (Batman) and Wonder Wife (Wonder Woman). It is hard to tell what fans of the Justice League will think when they see their favorite characters acting so out of character, but Young Animal creator notes that “young animal comics are… different from mainstream books – they bring the weird to the world, the fringe to the front”. Even if readers find themselves disheartened by the new lives of favorite characters, they can at least enjoy the art that makes this graphic novel so enjoyable. If you are a fan of Doom Patrol, this novel is definitely for you. If you are a fan of the DC universe or the Justice League, give this novel a try. It is not your ordinary Batman or Wonder Woman story line, and some of the actions taken by these characters may anger you, but you will find it interesting to see these characters in a different light. Some of the parallels they make may even surprise you and make you question everything. This graphic novel also does an excellent job of addressing real issues that readers may face. For instance, they touch upon mental health and how it is important to self-monitor and ask for help when needed. They also say that there is no shame in being manipulated, however, strength comes from surviving it and that they are stronger than the scar tissue they are left with. They even reach out to comic readers themselves, stating that fan-fiction is very real to some people, letting the readers know that they are not alone in their passions and beliefs. Lastly, they touch upon death, indicating that we all go from nothing to anything, easily being forgotten in a century, which may sound morbid and bleak, but hits upon the truth quite eloquently. (view spoiler)[The only downside to this graphic novel is that there is no way Bruce Wayne would just drink the milk that a crazy priest brought to him by breaking through his window. Very unbelievable. However, the parallel between Bruce’s yearning to take in and train junior superheroes and his becoming a pastor and transforming lost youths into heroes in the church was pretty spot on. Lastly, I found Diana’s motherhood over household appliances slightly bizarre, but after some consideration, it made sense that Wonder Wife would care for her appliances. (hide spoiler)]

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ronnie Ernst

    It was super strange and really funny. It felt like each creative team was trying to out-weird the previous (especially the Shade/Wonder Woman chapter). Batman has a great line that sums up the event: “This is beyond Darkseid, beyond Barbatos... it’s not insidious. It’s ridiculous. It’s impossible. Absurd...” Loved the introduction of Eternity Girl — felt very Grant Morrison. The intro of Elasti-Girl felt very Alan Moore. Both pitch perfect! Also the insults from Milkman Man were incredible. You It was super strange and really funny. It felt like each creative team was trying to out-weird the previous (especially the Shade/Wonder Woman chapter). Batman has a great line that sums up the event: “This is beyond Darkseid, beyond Barbatos... it’s not insidious. It’s ridiculous. It’s impossible. Absurd...” Loved the introduction of Eternity Girl — felt very Grant Morrison. The intro of Elasti-Girl felt very Alan Moore. Both pitch perfect! Also the insults from Milkman Man were incredible. You can tell Orlando and Way really know these characters. The overall theme seemed to be acceptance and to embrace yourself, which seems to be a recurring thought in the books of the Young Animal line. I’m glad DC has made a space for their strange stuff in the modern era. I don’t know of any other publisher that could mix classic superheroes and offbeat outcasts like this and do it so well.

  16. 4 out of 5

    John

    Very fun and weird (albeit in a Hot Topic vein)--a lot of fun notions involving marketing/homogenization/normality vs. weird/individualism/true art etc. It's one of those things about attempting to poke/subvert the bear--yet ultimately not achieving much other than a clean slate for a universe. Kind of like Marvel and Wildstorm's flirtatious attacks on American Hegemony without actually doing/saying anything about it other than "the change has only begun" and ending the story there. One of the m Very fun and weird (albeit in a Hot Topic vein)--a lot of fun notions involving marketing/homogenization/normality vs. weird/individualism/true art etc. It's one of those things about attempting to poke/subvert the bear--yet ultimately not achieving much other than a clean slate for a universe. Kind of like Marvel and Wildstorm's flirtatious attacks on American Hegemony without actually doing/saying anything about it other than "the change has only begun" and ending the story there. One of the more META crossover events, and that's saying something after Final Crisis/Multiversity/Metal.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Juan

    This crazy-ass story was weird beyond belief but... I liked it. The Justice League of America/Doom Patrol issues were perhaps the most interesting. Out of the Young Animal label, I only follow Mother Panic but even that issue seemed pretty good and made me really interested to see how the fall out of this story would effect Paige's Gotham City. I am a fan of Swamp Thing and his story part was interesting.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Miga Avalos

    This was something.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Larakaa

    I often like my comics weird and this one is very weird and meta. I enjoyed reading this a lot.

  20. 5 out of 5

    John

    a singular crossover event that reinvents its rules and our understanding of them with each issue

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bob Fries

    Fantastic book. Wonderfully weird book. Beautifully drawn, cleverly written. It has an incredible heart beating under its superhero/weirdo hero costume.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Liam Mcguire

    3.5. really solid book

  23. 4 out of 5

    Batmanjohnson

    I need to reread this a couple times.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Butcher

    A bit trip at times, I mean it is Young Animal, but overall a strong crossover between the Young Animal and the DC line!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    I'd never read any Young Animal titles, so I thought this would be a good opportunity to check them out, and it totally was! This was a fun introduction to the different characters, and I feel like I know which Young Animal titles I'd like to pick up and check out now. (DOOM PATROL!!)

  26. 5 out of 5

    David Horsburgh

  27. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Wolden

  28. 5 out of 5

    Fez Vaccaro

  29. 4 out of 5

    Denis

  30. 4 out of 5

    B. Johnston

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