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Mystery Mile (Albert Campion #2)

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Judge Crowdy Lobbett has found evidence pointing to the identity of the criminal mastermind behind the deadly Simister gang. After four attempts on his life, he ends up seeking the help of the enigmatic and unorthodox amateur sleuth, Albert Campion. After Campion bundles Lobbett off to a country house in Mystery Mile, deep in the Suffolk countryside, all manner of adventur Judge Crowdy Lobbett has found evidence pointing to the identity of the criminal mastermind behind the deadly Simister gang. After four attempts on his life, he ends up seeking the help of the enigmatic and unorthodox amateur sleuth, Albert Campion. After Campion bundles Lobbett off to a country house in Mystery Mile, deep in the Suffolk countryside, all manner of adventures ensue. It's a race against time for Campion to get the judge to safety and decipher the clue to their mysterious enemy's name.


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Judge Crowdy Lobbett has found evidence pointing to the identity of the criminal mastermind behind the deadly Simister gang. After four attempts on his life, he ends up seeking the help of the enigmatic and unorthodox amateur sleuth, Albert Campion. After Campion bundles Lobbett off to a country house in Mystery Mile, deep in the Suffolk countryside, all manner of adventur Judge Crowdy Lobbett has found evidence pointing to the identity of the criminal mastermind behind the deadly Simister gang. After four attempts on his life, he ends up seeking the help of the enigmatic and unorthodox amateur sleuth, Albert Campion. After Campion bundles Lobbett off to a country house in Mystery Mile, deep in the Suffolk countryside, all manner of adventures ensue. It's a race against time for Campion to get the judge to safety and decipher the clue to their mysterious enemy's name.

30 review for Mystery Mile (Albert Campion #2)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Carol ꧁꧂

    This was my first Allingham & my expectations were maybe a bit high. This book is only number 2 in the series & apparently in the first book The Crime at Black Dudley Campion wasn't the lead detective. Campion is an appealing character & I can understand his creator falling for him (so to speak) I just felt that though I enjoyed a lot of the dialogue & the book's sense of place, that for quite a short book it took a long time to get to the point. I didn't think Allingham played fa This was my first Allingham & my expectations were maybe a bit high. This book is only number 2 in the series & apparently in the first book The Crime at Black Dudley Campion wasn't the lead detective. Campion is an appealing character & I can understand his creator falling for him (so to speak) I just felt that though I enjoyed a lot of the dialogue & the book's sense of place, that for quite a short book it took a long time to get to the point. I didn't think Allingham played fair with all her clues. I didn't have any trouble guessing who was the villain. I also didn't have any trouble putting the book aside. It is extremely unusual for me to take nearly a week to finish a Golden Age mystery, so I really don't think I can rate this book higher than 3.5★

  2. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Although I love Golden Age mysteries, I have had a rocky relationship with Margery Allingham over the years. Having decided to give her another try and read the Campion series from the very beginning, I enjoyed, “The Crime at Black Dudley,” and decided to continue with “Mystery Mile.” As with, “The Crime at Black Dudley,” we have another novel featuring sinister gangs and criminal masterminds. Judge Lobbett has found evidence pointing to the identify the criminal mastermind behind the deadly Sim Although I love Golden Age mysteries, I have had a rocky relationship with Margery Allingham over the years. Having decided to give her another try and read the Campion series from the very beginning, I enjoyed, “The Crime at Black Dudley,” and decided to continue with “Mystery Mile.” As with, “The Crime at Black Dudley,” we have another novel featuring sinister gangs and criminal masterminds. Judge Lobbett has found evidence pointing to the identify the criminal mastermind behind the deadly Simister gang. There have been several attempts on his life and now his son, Marlowe, and daughter, Isopel, have persuaded him to leave the States for England. However, it is soon apparent that leaving the country has not put him out of danger and Albert Campion foils an attempt on his life on board the ship, “Elephantine.” This leads Marlowe to track Campion down in London and for Judge Lobbett, and his family, to be spirited away to Mystery Mile and a country house owned by Giles and Biddy Paget. This is an exciting, and fast moving, story. There are odd visitors, suspicious locals, tragic deaths and daring rescues. We get to meet Campion’s sidekick, Magersfontein Lugg, and there are also some romance, between the two young couples. I have found that reading this series from the beginning, even if I have been told that the early novels are not the best, has given me a good background to the characters. I am enjoying my forays into Allingham’s earlier work and hope to continue the series.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ivonne Rovira

    OK, I have an admission. Margery Allingham clearly based bespectacled, fair-haired, and apparently silly Albert Campion, first introduced in The Crime at Black Dudley in 1929, on Lord Peter Wimsey — no matter how much I refused to admit it when I read Allingham’s debut novel. Supposedly, Campion was to be a parody of Lord Peter. I thoroughly enjoyed The Crime at Black Dudley, with its Simister syndicate and the English-house-party-gone-wrong plot, and I didn’t care whether the treatment was an ho OK, I have an admission. Margery Allingham clearly based bespectacled, fair-haired, and apparently silly Albert Campion, first introduced in The Crime at Black Dudley in 1929, on Lord Peter Wimsey — no matter how much I refused to admit it when I read Allingham’s debut novel. Supposedly, Campion was to be a parody of Lord Peter. I thoroughly enjoyed The Crime at Black Dudley, with its Simister syndicate and the English-house-party-gone-wrong plot, and I didn’t care whether the treatment was an homage or a ripoff or what. But I’m ready to admit it now. Both are the deceptively foolish younger son of a peer who undertake a bit of sleuthing on the down-low. But — dare I admit it? — I actually prefer Albert Campion (actually, one of the many pseudonyms of a man actually named Sir Rudolph). Disinherited, liable to play fast and loose with the law, employing the only semi-reformed criminal Magersfontein Lugg as a less feudal version of Mervyn Bunter, Campion never stoops to Lord Peter’s constant moralizing and antediluvian ideas. What’s not to love? Stubborn but honest Judge Crowdy Lobbett, targeted by the Simister gang, encounters Campion on a trans-Atlantic voyage to England. At the behest of Lobbett’s son, Campion takes the Lobbett family to the eponymous Mystery Mile, a backwater Suffolk hamlet, to keep them hidden. Needless to say, all does not go as planned (there wouldn’t be a novel otherwise, would there?), and readers will enjoy every page in this suspenseful novel in which the Lobbetts and Campion try to outwit the clever head of the gang, Simister himself. I had no idea of Simister’s secret identity until Alligham chose to reveal it, and the high-stakes ending will have readers glued to Mystery Mile late into the night.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    Didn't expect to read this book so soon or all in one go, but I was having trouble sleeping, so I figured, why not? It's very obviously a cousin of Sayers' Lord Peter (Campion could, in fact, be Peter's cousin), although in a more satirical vein. Albert Campion is a pretty close analogue of Peter Wimsey, complete with a number of idiosyncrasies, and Lugg (although of a decidedly more criminal bent than Bunter) shares some characteristics with Lord Peter's man. It's still fun, even though it's mor Didn't expect to read this book so soon or all in one go, but I was having trouble sleeping, so I figured, why not? It's very obviously a cousin of Sayers' Lord Peter (Campion could, in fact, be Peter's cousin), although in a more satirical vein. Albert Campion is a pretty close analogue of Peter Wimsey, complete with a number of idiosyncrasies, and Lugg (although of a decidedly more criminal bent than Bunter) shares some characteristics with Lord Peter's man. It's still fun, even though it's more or less mocking one of my favourite series in many ways -- it manages to be a story on its own, too. It didn't involve me emotionally, but I did read it straight through, in one go, so there's that going for it. I did find the mystery a little bit disjointed/incoherent: it helped that I'd read a summary somewhere before, but some of the events seemed pretty random. Overall, I enjoyed it enough that I might pick up more, but not enough that I'm going to be in a hurry. Allingham was a capable writer, but Campion's not interesting enough to me to follow him compulsively.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Fran

    I've heard ‘If you like Dorothy L. Sayers and Agatha Christie, you'll love Marjory Allingham’ -- I do not love Marjory Allingham. Even if this Felony & Mayhem "Vintage" edition weren't studded with typographical errors, it would be an irritating read. Protagonist Albert Campion may be able to maintain dozens of aliases, but he is constantly making errors of the ‘not to worry, the evil gang can't possibly be on to us yet’ and ‘it's perfectly safe for the womenfolk to wander down to the villag I've heard ‘If you like Dorothy L. Sayers and Agatha Christie, you'll love Marjory Allingham’ -- I do not love Marjory Allingham. Even if this Felony & Mayhem "Vintage" edition weren't studded with typographical errors, it would be an irritating read. Protagonist Albert Campion may be able to maintain dozens of aliases, but he is constantly making errors of the ‘not to worry, the evil gang can't possibly be on to us yet’ and ‘it's perfectly safe for the womenfolk to wander down to the village alone’ kind. The other characters just sort of blend together. Marlowe is young, foolish, ineffectual, and handsome. Giles is young, foolish, ineffectual, and stupid. Both Biddy and Isopel are young, distraught, and appealing. Then there are a bunch of Cockney associates. Campion follows in the footsteps of Sherlock Holmes in the sense that both are clever but likely to solve the mystery after all the important people are dead.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Oakes

    Would I recommend it? Yes. Whether or not you've read the first one doesn't matter in this book -- from here on out, though, you'll want to make sure you read the series in order (from what I remember). Not a cozy, exactly, but if you like British mysteries, you'll like it. Campion is somewhat enigmatic, but here, unlike in the first mystery of the series, he's pretty much on his own. Still holding on to that silly exterior, his character is a bit more developed in this novel. The story opens on Would I recommend it? Yes. Whether or not you've read the first one doesn't matter in this book -- from here on out, though, you'll want to make sure you read the series in order (from what I remember). Not a cozy, exactly, but if you like British mysteries, you'll like it. Campion is somewhat enigmatic, but here, unlike in the first mystery of the series, he's pretty much on his own. Still holding on to that silly exterior, his character is a bit more developed in this novel. The story opens on board an ocean liner going back to England from the US. On this ship is someone quite special: a man who has narrowly escaped death at the hands of the Simister gang many times, after repeated attempts. While on board, another attempt is made, and Campion decides he needs to take this man and his family under his protective wing at a remote village on the coast known as Mystery Mile. I love golden-age mysteries, and although to some they may seem quite dated, to me that's part of their charm. So sit back, relax, and enjoy this well-done mystery while you're having a nice cup of tea.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Deborah

    I am in a classic mystery phase. I have been reading Ngaio Marsh (Inspector Alleyn), listening to Agatha Christie in the car and have just started on Margerty Allingham's Albert Campion. I read the first book in the series (in which Campion plays a minor role) a month or so ago and now I have just read Mystery Mile. I enjoyed it very much. I know that some people find Campion's silly persona annoying but I don't. I like that he hides his intellect and abilities, constantly causing people to unde I am in a classic mystery phase. I have been reading Ngaio Marsh (Inspector Alleyn), listening to Agatha Christie in the car and have just started on Margerty Allingham's Albert Campion. I read the first book in the series (in which Campion plays a minor role) a month or so ago and now I have just read Mystery Mile. I enjoyed it very much. I know that some people find Campion's silly persona annoying but I don't. I like that he hides his intellect and abilities, constantly causing people to underestimate him. To me it makes the moments when he is serious more poignant because they contrast sharply with his usual style. I read these books for the atmosphere, humor and quirky characters. I like following the detectives through time and seeing how their lives evolve. The mystery is secondary to me. I almost never guess who it is because I spend less time paying attention to the clues and more to the people and their relationships. I am looking forward to starting the next book in this series tonight . . .

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bandit

    This is my second time reading Allingham and apparently a second mystery for this particular character. Every mystery writer has a detective and Allingham has Alfred Campion, a slightly ludicrous, though highly amusing character who, according to his business card, has no time for cases that are vulgar or plebeian. This was a sort of quaint or cozy mystery and for some reason it just didn't work for me. For all its charm of bygone era, the story felt too muddy and only maintained my interest jus This is my second time reading Allingham and apparently a second mystery for this particular character. Every mystery writer has a detective and Allingham has Alfred Campion, a slightly ludicrous, though highly amusing character who, according to his business card, has no time for cases that are vulgar or plebeian. This was a sort of quaint or cozy mystery and for some reason it just didn't work for me. For all its charm of bygone era, the story felt too muddy and only maintained my interest just enough to see what happens at the end, but not really caring about the outcome. I'm not sure how much of it is the book's fault, there is a chance I just wasn't in the mood for it. It was a perfectly decent read and pleasantly quick one at that, but didn't really entice or invited to check out more Campion mysteries. Thanks Netgalley.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    This is the second book in the Albert Campion series. They are okay, and the characters are fun, the story itself really didn't hold my interest. I listened to this on audiobook, and the narrator was excellent, giving each character a unique voice, so that was definitely a plus. However, I found that while I enjoyed the characters and the flavour and humour they brought, I was very easily distracted from the murder mystery. I might pick up others in this series if I needed an audiobook for commuti This is the second book in the Albert Campion series. They are okay, and the characters are fun, the story itself really didn't hold my interest. I listened to this on audiobook, and the narrator was excellent, giving each character a unique voice, so that was definitely a plus. However, I found that while I enjoyed the characters and the flavour and humour they brought, I was very easily distracted from the murder mystery. I might pick up others in this series if I needed an audiobook for commuting, but the series isn't good enough that I would go out of my way to make sure to read all of them. It's an okay series.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Val

    I enjoyed the atmospheric "Tiger in the Smoke" by the same author, but not this one as much. This is more plot driven, there is a mystery, a criminal mastermind, an unexplained (until the end) suicide, some suspicious foreigners and quite a lot of action, but it was curiously lacking in suspense despite all that. It did not help that I found Albert Campion irritating and the rest of the characters shallow.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jan C

    While reading this one. I found out that dear Albert was only a featured character in the first book. The Crime at Black Dudley. I enjoyed that one. As I also enjoyed this one. Both have the same criminals - the Simister crowd. I had it partially solved. Right guy but didn't know his position.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    This was fun. I especially enjoyed Albert Campion's quirky personality and speech style, although I didn't understand some of his allusions and vocabulary. Will definitely read more Campions.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mare

    I do adore Albert Campion. This was a reread for me and just as enjoyable the second time around. Can't recommend this series enough!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

    After several attempts on his life, Judge Lobbett engages the help of unconventional amateur detective Albert Campion. The judge has been engaged in the fight against the criminal activities of the Simister gang, and believes they have followed him to England. Campion arranges for the Judge and his family to take refuge in the Suffolk village of Mystery Mile, but strange visitors and a sudden death mean that he has to use all his ingenuity to keep the family out of danger. Enjoyable mystery/thril After several attempts on his life, Judge Lobbett engages the help of unconventional amateur detective Albert Campion. The judge has been engaged in the fight against the criminal activities of the Simister gang, and believes they have followed him to England. Campion arranges for the Judge and his family to take refuge in the Suffolk village of Mystery Mile, but strange visitors and a sudden death mean that he has to use all his ingenuity to keep the family out of danger. Enjoyable mystery/thriller with an engaging mixture of fun and menace. As we would expect from a Golden Age novel, there is no graphic violence but the reader is in no doubt that these are real criminals who don't mess about. Against them is pitted the ebullient Campion, who shows glimpses of his true character behind his 'silly ass' persona and intriguing hints of a hidden past. The story also introduces Campion's assistant, Magersfontein Lugg, and there is a cast of interesting secondary characters, especially among the villagers who get involved in the plot. This was a well written story with a satisfying ending that tied up the loose ends. Campion is one of my favourite Golden Age detectives for his hidden depths, and I am thoroughly enjoying rereading a series that I first encountered over 40 years ago.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Orinoco Womble (tidy bag and all)

    I remember seeing a few episodes of the "Campion" TV series in the 1980s. Though I enjoyed the actors, there was a little too much emphasis on woo-woo "occultism" in the television version for me. It's refreshing to read the original yarns and find that they owe much more to Boys' Own and The Eagle than to ghoulies, ghosties and things that go bump in the night. I can also see that Peter Davison was perfectly cast as the ubiquitous Campion, whose silly-ass manner hides a mind and abilities that I remember seeing a few episodes of the "Campion" TV series in the 1980s. Though I enjoyed the actors, there was a little too much emphasis on woo-woo "occultism" in the television version for me. It's refreshing to read the original yarns and find that they owe much more to Boys' Own and The Eagle than to ghoulies, ghosties and things that go bump in the night. I can also see that Peter Davison was perfectly cast as the ubiquitous Campion, whose silly-ass manner hides a mind and abilities that 007 could only envy. No exploding toothpaste for our Albert--he doesn't even carry a gun. Mystery Mile is an adventurous romp through the English countryside, from the judge who vanishes from a yew maze to the Moriarty-like criminal mastermind that has held two countries in thrall for--is it really over a century? There are of course a couple of pretty girls, one of whom (of course) needs rescuing, two dashing would-be heroes, and the warmhearted Cockney crook and his mum, "who's as good as a bull pup." The American millionaire's son can't help talking just like an English prepschool boy, and there's a bit of what my friend Elizabeth calls "cheerful racism" (did you know that all Turks have pear-shaped heads, dear?) but it was published in 1929, after all. But seriously..."Isopel"? As a name for an American girl? (As a name for anyone? ) And does Allingham seriously think that "Crowdy Lobbet" is a standard sort of American name? Hmmm. She must have had an advance copy of the Hitchhiker's Guide. I did place the baddy about five pages after he turned up, but then I've read a lot of this sort of stuff. Enough, for example, to see that Miss Allingham was more than a bit inspired by Lord Peter Wimsey; if not blood brothers, he and Campion are at least first cousins.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Carl

    If you like those post-Victorian era novels, then this mystery could be for you! Allingham has developed an interesting character in Campion, one who appears to be more of a aristocratic, dapper, bumbling fool than a shrewd detective (a bit pre Colombo). Campion keeps up a steady patter of nonsense, bad jokes and "wonderful puns," interspersed with the plants and plots the keep him and his fellow characters alive. Being developed along with his character is his regular compatriot Lugg (his man - If you like those post-Victorian era novels, then this mystery could be for you! Allingham has developed an interesting character in Campion, one who appears to be more of a aristocratic, dapper, bumbling fool than a shrewd detective (a bit pre Colombo). Campion keeps up a steady patter of nonsense, bad jokes and "wonderful puns," interspersed with the plants and plots the keep him and his fellow characters alive. Being developed along with his character is his regular compatriot Lugg (his man - I won't say the "butler" did it!) who is a total foil to Campion's character, and still Lugg remains extremely loyal to our main character. An interesting pair of characters in a mystery which develops rapidly, although it takes a while to deveop and to warm up to some of the characters. Campion is not Poirot, but he is certainly a delightful divergence in a mystery series. I will pursue more of these books to see how these characters develop.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    Although still concerned with international crime syndicates, Mystery Mile is a good, page-turning mystery, and a thorough-going introduction to Albert Campion as main character (rather than bit part). There's an almost Holmesian quality to these stories and it's hard not to be charmed by Campion, whose guise of fool is only nine-parts false. The women in the early Campion stories aren't tremendously impressive (at least compared to a later stand-out). They're either fragile flowers or practical, Although still concerned with international crime syndicates, Mystery Mile is a good, page-turning mystery, and a thorough-going introduction to Albert Campion as main character (rather than bit part). There's an almost Holmesian quality to these stories and it's hard not to be charmed by Campion, whose guise of fool is only nine-parts false. The women in the early Campion stories aren't tremendously impressive (at least compared to a later stand-out). They're either fragile flowers or practical, nice girls whose role is to be protected. Allingham - like most Golden Age British mystery writers - has a fair chunk of classism and a dash of racism embedded in the mileau, which does give the occasional pause.

  18. 4 out of 5

    J.V. Seem

    Some Golden Age crime is always nice. This author, though, is new to me. I was very excited at the start of this book; the premise was just so good. The execution, however, is a bit flaky. The story is set in a small English village, where an American judge is hiding out from some vengeful gangsters who have vowed to kill him. As tempting as that concept sounds, I felt that the merging of those two worlds, NYC mafia vs. English village life, isn't as seamless as it could have been. At times, it fe Some Golden Age crime is always nice. This author, though, is new to me. I was very excited at the start of this book; the premise was just so good. The execution, however, is a bit flaky. The story is set in a small English village, where an American judge is hiding out from some vengeful gangsters who have vowed to kill him. As tempting as that concept sounds, I felt that the merging of those two worlds, NYC mafia vs. English village life, isn't as seamless as it could have been. At times, it feels like alternating between two different novels. It also has, at times, a tendency to get a bit confusing (not in a good way). To conclude: An uneven mystery, but one that during the good parts conjures up writing the likes of John Dickson Carr.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    I've finished my second Albert Campion book. It is very deliberate, detailed writing! I have to remember that it was written almost 90 years ago! It is written in a time when readers played close attention to miniscule analysis of story and plot. Before there were cell phones, tv's, even radio, the reader knew how to tune in! I had some hard time following all the trivial plot details. I listened to most of it and had to laugh at the British narrator's interpretation of the American accent---jus I've finished my second Albert Campion book. It is very deliberate, detailed writing! I have to remember that it was written almost 90 years ago! It is written in a time when readers played close attention to miniscule analysis of story and plot. Before there were cell phones, tv's, even radio, the reader knew how to tune in! I had some hard time following all the trivial plot details. I listened to most of it and had to laugh at the British narrator's interpretation of the American accent---just make him/her sound like Humphrey Bogart. The plot revolves around the bad guy, Simister, who has already wreaked havoc on New York City, pursuing an American judge, Crowdy Lobbet, and his family to England. Albert Campion is hired to protect the judge from Simister. Additional characters evolve and so does the location of the mystery, an English Village called Mystery Mile. Not everyone will like this series and I do have to make a decision regarding continuing with my precious reading time with Albert!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Hilary (A Wytch's Book Review)

    Campion travels back from the States on the same ship as the renowned US Judge Crowdy Lobbett, during the journey he saves the Judge's life and once in the UK arranges for him (and his son and daughter) to stay at Mystery Mile in order to keep him and his family safe.  It seems though as if the Simister gang are ahead of them and no where seems to be safe, we have disappearances, blackmail, kidnapping and attempted murder! So Campion (and his somewhat unorthodox manservant Lugg) need to pull all Campion travels back from the States on the same ship as the renowned US Judge Crowdy Lobbett, during the journey he saves the Judge's life and once in the UK arranges for him (and his son and daughter) to stay at Mystery Mile in order to keep him and his family safe.  It seems though as if the Simister gang are ahead of them and no where seems to be safe, we have disappearances, blackmail, kidnapping and attempted murder! So Campion (and his somewhat unorthodox manservant Lugg) need to pull all the stops out to keep people safe.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Gets off to a somewhat slow start, but the plot is engaging. Not her finest, but a good read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    Seriously silly. I forgot how much fun this series is.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Osborne

    The first "starring" role for Campion, the urbane adventurer for hire. Nothing sordid, mind you. Here he's helping an American and his family. The father has a price on his head, being targeted by a man known only as Simister. Not quite as good as some of the other Allinghams, but still enjoyable.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Merrilee Gibson

    In this, the second appearance of “Albert Campion” we are treated to a masterful and sweeping mystery tale in the grandest of grand manners. Mr. Campion is quietly enlisted to the aid of Judge Crowdy Lobbett. It soon becomes apparent that Lobbett’s life is in danger because he knows too much about a notorious underworld organization known only as Simister, which is legendary and known to be ruthless. Judge Lobbett, his son Malcolm and daughter Isopel, are all taken to a remote manor of Mystery Mil In this, the second appearance of “Albert Campion” we are treated to a masterful and sweeping mystery tale in the grandest of grand manners. Mr. Campion is quietly enlisted to the aid of Judge Crowdy Lobbett. It soon becomes apparent that Lobbett’s life is in danger because he knows too much about a notorious underworld organization known only as Simister, which is legendary and known to be ruthless. Judge Lobbett, his son Malcolm and daughter Isopel, are all taken to a remote manor of Mystery Mile for their safety. Arriving at Mystery Mile they are greeted by the (impoverished) lord of the manor, young Giles, and his sister Biddy. Soon the judge goes missing, which is upsetting for Giles and Biddy, while Albert seems oddly sanguine about this turn of events. The seriousness of the situation is offset by the persistent efforts of a purported art expert who wishes to authenticate and sell an artwork for Judge Lobbett. He seems unable to grasp that Giles and Biddy are more concerned about their father’s life than any artwork. But the man is such a stubborn dunderhead that he is tolerated because that is easier than getting him to desist. Bit by bit, the tale unfolds for us, as Allingham tantalizes us with hints that offer glimmers but no real answers. Along the way, we do get glimpses behind the curtain of the “Campion” character and learn fascinating things about him. We have always felt he has Friends in High Places, but it now seems that he is closely connected with a European royal family, and we learn that his first name appears to be Rudolph. There is a suggestion of disinheritance, but there still seems to be access to regal treatment and facilities when the need is great. In reading this book, one is aware of a masterful hand working skillfully on a large elaborate canvas. It is quite exhilarating to experience the creative process as it grows with each chapter we read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nick Pemberton

    My 2nd Margery Allingham after Crime at Black Dudley, also Ms Allingham's 1st & 2nd in the Albert Campion mysteries. I enjoyed this book though these early Campion mysteries are pretty lightweight compared to her slightly later output, still very readable though. In this book we are introduced to Campion's factotum, Lugg, combined servant, assistant, nurse-maid & all-round expert in the ways of the underworld, I'm looking forward to seeing more of him in future books. The basic premise o My 2nd Margery Allingham after Crime at Black Dudley, also Ms Allingham's 1st & 2nd in the Albert Campion mysteries. I enjoyed this book though these early Campion mysteries are pretty lightweight compared to her slightly later output, still very readable though. In this book we are introduced to Campion's factotum, Lugg, combined servant, assistant, nurse-maid & all-round expert in the ways of the underworld, I'm looking forward to seeing more of him in future books. The basic premise of this book is that Campion is helping an American judge, Crowdy Lobbett, to hide out from the dangerous Simister gang many of whose members have been sent to jail by Judge Lobbett back in the States. He thinks he has a clue as to the true identity of the shadowy head of the gang & his life is now in jeopardy. Will Campion succeed in keeping the judge safe on a small Suffolk island or will he become another victim of Simister?? You will have fun finding out in this early example of Golden Age crime writing.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jill Hutchinson

    Allingham's Campion books may be an acquired taste as some readers are put off by the main character's "silly ass" persona while others find him endearing. I am somewhere in the middle.......this is the second in the long running series and Campion is still a fatuous twit who is hard to take seriously although outward appearances hide his true character. But I enjoyed this little mystery about a unknown master-mind criminal who employs a world wide network of minions to do his bidding. In this c Allingham's Campion books may be an acquired taste as some readers are put off by the main character's "silly ass" persona while others find him endearing. I am somewhere in the middle.......this is the second in the long running series and Campion is still a fatuous twit who is hard to take seriously although outward appearances hide his true character. But I enjoyed this little mystery about a unknown master-mind criminal who employs a world wide network of minions to do his bidding. In this case he has targeted a judge who holds the key to his identity and it is Campion's job to find out the answer and protect the judge from certain death. It becomes obvious that Campion is not exactly who he portrays himself to be and this puzzle continues through all the books in the series.....but that is only an aside in this story set in the Mystery Mile, a fog shrouded salt marsh where the majority of the action occurs. A little humor, a little mystery and a little romance makes this an entertaining entry in the series.

  27. 5 out of 5

    JZ

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 2nd in series. First published in 1930. Update for ebook. The liberties taken with poking fun at Peter Wimsey and Bunter are hilarious, the humour is droll, and the ending one of my favorites. So funny! And I have discovered a bunch of these online, not available at the library, and can be read by an independent reader app, which can translate it to audiobook. I'm so happy, I could cry. There are even British English voices to download, so it doesn't sound so Stephen Hawkings-ish. They've come a 2nd in series. First published in 1930. Update for ebook. The liberties taken with poking fun at Peter Wimsey and Bunter are hilarious, the humour is droll, and the ending one of my favorites. So funny! And I have discovered a bunch of these online, not available at the library, and can be read by an independent reader app, which can translate it to audiobook. I'm so happy, I could cry. There are even British English voices to download, so it doesn't sound so Stephen Hawkings-ish. They've come a long way, baby! So very much better than her first Campion, The Black Dudley something. He gets fleshed out better, Lugg is missing in the first half, but is invaluable in the last, and the end is a surprise. Marvelous! Lots of in jokes, British 30's style, some of which are worth looking up on Wikipedia. A really good reread for my annual March mystery marathon. English cozies in blustery weather, unsuitable for gardening. Netflix has this BBC production. Excellent interpretation.

  28. 5 out of 5

    russell barnes

    Wowzers, Mystery Mile knocks the couple of other Campion/Allingham books I've read into a cocked hat. Where the others felt stilted and a bit leaden, here the action zips along uncluttered by the Whimsey-lite latin interjections and snatches of song - even the lugubrious Lugg is gets a (marginally) brighter 3D personality make-over, which is all to the good. The obvious reason here is this is one of the earlier Campion novels, and you do get a sense of Allingham spreading her literary wings whils Wowzers, Mystery Mile knocks the couple of other Campion/Allingham books I've read into a cocked hat. Where the others felt stilted and a bit leaden, here the action zips along uncluttered by the Whimsey-lite latin interjections and snatches of song - even the lugubrious Lugg is gets a (marginally) brighter 3D personality make-over, which is all to the good. The obvious reason here is this is one of the earlier Campion novels, and you do get a sense of Allingham spreading her literary wings whilst still retaining some youthful vim. The upshot of which is where I've been wavering on the Campion front, this readable variation of the locked room mystery has bought back into the fold. Pip pip.

  29. 4 out of 5

    M Christopher

    After discovering that a secondary character, Albert Campion, was by far the most interesting creation in her "The Black Dudley Murder," Margery Allingham built a series of mysteries around him. By the second book, "Mystery Mile," Campion is beginning to emerge from his original guise as a parody of the more famous Lord Peter Wimsey to become a fascinating character in his own right. A cracking tale of murder, mayhem, and mystery, the reader gets new insights into Albert's character, including h After discovering that a secondary character, Albert Campion, was by far the most interesting creation in her "The Black Dudley Murder," Margery Allingham built a series of mysteries around him. By the second book, "Mystery Mile," Campion is beginning to emerge from his original guise as a parody of the more famous Lord Peter Wimsey to become a fascinating character in his own right. A cracking tale of murder, mayhem, and mystery, the reader gets new insights into Albert's character, including his susceptible heart, and, at the end, is left with yet another on-going mystery: who IS Albert Campion, really? Great fun.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Deb

    If you enjoy vintage mysteries, then you already know you will be faced with stereotypes and cultural/societal attitudes. Mystery Mile is full of these, which when you time travel through literature, you must expect. So, with that out of the way...Mystery Mile is not disappointing. Allingham creates fun characters (those sinister, as well as, angelic), giving them clever, tight, and logical dialog. Her death scenes are creepy and oh, so good! Campion, our sleuth, is an enigma whose revelations o If you enjoy vintage mysteries, then you already know you will be faced with stereotypes and cultural/societal attitudes. Mystery Mile is full of these, which when you time travel through literature, you must expect. So, with that out of the way...Mystery Mile is not disappointing. Allingham creates fun characters (those sinister, as well as, angelic), giving them clever, tight, and logical dialog. Her death scenes are creepy and oh, so good! Campion, our sleuth, is an enigma whose revelations of self keep the reader interested. This was my first Allingham. I will read more.

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