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Set before the events of Solo: A Star Wars Story! Han and Qi'ra don't have a lot in common other than not having a lot. They're street kids on the industrial planet Corellia, doing whatever it takes to get by, dreaming of something more. They each jump at a chance to prove themselves in the perilous world of Corellia's criminal underbelly, only to discover they are on the Set before the events of Solo: A Star Wars Story! Han and Qi'ra don't have a lot in common other than not having a lot. They're street kids on the industrial planet Corellia, doing whatever it takes to get by, dreaming of something more. They each jump at a chance to prove themselves in the perilous world of Corellia's criminal underbelly, only to discover they are on the same mission for the same unscrupulous boss. When the job goes disastrously wrong, Han and Qi'ra are on the run--from pirates, a droid crime syndicate, the Empire, and their boss--and will have to learn to trust each other if they are going to survive.


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Set before the events of Solo: A Star Wars Story! Han and Qi'ra don't have a lot in common other than not having a lot. They're street kids on the industrial planet Corellia, doing whatever it takes to get by, dreaming of something more. They each jump at a chance to prove themselves in the perilous world of Corellia's criminal underbelly, only to discover they are on the Set before the events of Solo: A Star Wars Story! Han and Qi'ra don't have a lot in common other than not having a lot. They're street kids on the industrial planet Corellia, doing whatever it takes to get by, dreaming of something more. They each jump at a chance to prove themselves in the perilous world of Corellia's criminal underbelly, only to discover they are on the same mission for the same unscrupulous boss. When the job goes disastrously wrong, Han and Qi'ra are on the run--from pirates, a droid crime syndicate, the Empire, and their boss--and will have to learn to trust each other if they are going to survive.

30 review for Most Wanted (Star Wars Disney Canon Novel)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Khurram

    Thank you Rae Carson for getting Han Solo spot on. After reading Last Shot I was a little worried about reading another Han Solo book. I think it makes a big difference when a book is written by a fan. I enjoyed this book right from the beginning, Rae I think managed to capture all the aspects of Han’s personality. He is cocky, but loyal and compassionate. A “scoundrel” but with great leadership qualities. Han is famous for his piloting skills, we see his natural aptitude for it in this book, but Thank you Rae Carson for getting Han Solo spot on. After reading Last Shot I was a little worried about reading another Han Solo book. I think it makes a big difference when a book is written by a fan. I enjoyed this book right from the beginning, Rae I think managed to capture all the aspects of Han’s personality. He is cocky, but loyal and compassionate. A “scoundrel” but with great leadership qualities. Han is famous for his piloting skills, we see his natural aptitude for it in this book, but others skill Han has but are a bit overlooked on the movies and books is his ability to think quickly (improving), his understanding of languages and he is a pretty handy mechanic as well. The side characters are done really well too. I think Qi’ra was also introduced very well. I liked the fast paced setting of the book. I also like how Han and Qi’ra’s relationship changes and their characters develop through the book. An excellent introduction to a very (possible 18 year old) young Han Solo definitely showing the traits of the legendary character he is to grow into.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Seadrift

    This felt more like I was reading a juvenile Star Wars novel, than a novel dedicated to an adult audience. I got to know some about Solo's background, which was enjoyable enough, and the introduction of Solo's -possibly - first love interest showed me a more human side. The book wasn't bad. The writer just wasn't good enough to write a Star Wars novel.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    Set some time prior to the Solo film, Most Wanted features Han and Qi'ra before they became the charismatic characters on the screen as they struggle to eek out an existence in the sewers as members of the Lady Proxima led White Worms on the planet Corellia. When a position opens up as second to Lady Proxima, both Han and Qi'ra, who at this stage have little in common aside from life beneath the surface, are pitted against one another on separate missions to acquire a piece of Imperial tech whic Set some time prior to the Solo film, Most Wanted features Han and Qi'ra before they became the charismatic characters on the screen as they struggle to eek out an existence in the sewers as members of the Lady Proxima led White Worms on the planet Corellia. When a position opens up as second to Lady Proxima, both Han and Qi'ra, who at this stage have little in common aside from life beneath the surface, are pitted against one another on separate missions to acquire a piece of Imperial tech which would make Lady Proxima and her gang one of the more formidable factions in the Star Wars universe. Of course, it all goes bad and Han and Qi'ra are left to fend for themselves, dodging both laser blasts and Lady Proxima's wrath. Most Wanted captures the essence of Han which isn't easy to do off-screen, and expands upon Qi'ra's agenda as glimpsed in the Solo film to emphasize her importance in the Disney cannon, while also strengthening the bond between her and Han as was a focal point in the film. The plot is straight forward and feels like a well planned story arc in Star Wars Rebels while capturing that New Hope feel. There's no filler content, just action, great characters and that unique Star Wars geekery I love so much. My rating: 5/5 stars. I strongly recommend watching the Solo film before reading Most Wanted as the place-setting and characters (such as Lady Proxima) are much easier to visualize.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Neil Hepworth

    Dear Disney and Lucasfilm, If you're really going to take a bit of time to reflect and revise on your whole Star Wars strategy, let me suggest you also reevaluate your line of novels. Lately, they're been really boring, and lately you've been giving novels to authors who don't know how to write Star Wars novels. The characters are bland, the plots are so very thin, and the writing is cliched and uninspired. In particular, your crop of recent YA writers are just awful. Please just give some novels Dear Disney and Lucasfilm, If you're really going to take a bit of time to reflect and revise on your whole Star Wars strategy, let me suggest you also reevaluate your line of novels. Lately, they're been really boring, and lately you've been giving novels to authors who don't know how to write Star Wars novels. The characters are bland, the plots are so very thin, and the writing is cliched and uninspired. In particular, your crop of recent YA writers are just awful. Please just give some novels to established adult writers. I want so desperately to like the new novels, and for a few years I did--but man, the last year of novels have been really bad. Neil

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rachael

    "What keeps you flying is having one person in all the galaxy to fly with. Someone you can trust to have your back." I HAVE SO MANY FEELINGS ABOUT THIS BOOK. Wow, okay. Where to start? Let's start with the characterizations. This YA novel does an incredible job of helping the reader understand Qi'ra as a person and what motivates her. Solo: A Star Wars Story kept her as en enigma, which was perfect for twists and turns in the story. But I feel like after reading MOST WANTED, I can connect with w "What keeps you flying is having one person in all the galaxy to fly with. Someone you can trust to have your back." I HAVE SO MANY FEELINGS ABOUT THIS BOOK. Wow, okay. Where to start? Let's start with the characterizations. This YA novel does an incredible job of helping the reader understand Qi'ra as a person and what motivates her. Solo: A Star Wars Story kept her as en enigma, which was perfect for twists and turns in the story. But I feel like after reading MOST WANTED, I can connect with why she makes the decisions she does in the movie and find her relationship with Han more believable. They go through so much in this short novel and find a real path to friendship. Qi'ra benefits from having him around and she respects his ability to make decisions on the fly and take risks. The information about her secret hideout gave me a lot of feelings and broke my heart. Han in MOST WANTED is basically perfect characterization. So much of the smug, attitude driven scoundrel with a good heart that we all love. You understand why he clutches onto Qi'ra so much in Solo by seeing their friendship blossom in this novel. He is desperate to reach the stars but doesn't find it to be a real possibility until the end of MOST WANTED. His secret speeder adds so much depth to the chase on Corellia in Solo, and it warmed my heart. I just love him. Now, onto Han and Qi'ra as a duo. I absolutely LOVED that this book didn't focus on their romance, but instead built upon their friendship. The last page of MOST WANTED shows how it was plausible that their friendship eventually turned into romance down the line, but spent this novel building them from the ground up as friends and partners. It is SO SAD to me that the quote at the top of this review is how Han feels about Qi'ra at the end of the book. Since we can see into her head, we know that she thinks Han would never betray her, but also that Qi'ra would never give up her life for his. Her priority is becoming comfortably rich and in a position of power. She turns down an offer in this novel, not because of Han, but because she would not have her own autonomy. And wow, that is delicious characterization. I haven't seen a complicated character like Qi'ra in a long time. Unfortunately for him, Han would do almost anything to make sure that she is safe with him. Because that's how he treats his friends. And she is one of the only people he trusts in the world. It is even more devastating to look at the end of Solo after reading this, since he absolutely believed that he found his partner in exploring the universe. And maybe if she had gotten off Corellia in Solo it would have been different, but I don't think so. The two of them wanted such different lives. They both just wanted to get off that planet and onto something else. They care for each other and find some peace there - but Han and Qi'ra are not meant to be each other's one person in the galaxy to fly around with. And that's okay. The secondary characters all had unique voices and I really enjoyed getting to know the crime syndicates better. A little Rodian who believes in the Force stole my heart. I'm sure I will be able to find so many easter eggs in Solo now that I didn't before! This book added such richness to the planet in this new canon and I really appreciate that. I feel like I know Corellia so much better now after reading MOST WANTED. The ending felt a bit rushed, that's the only critique I would really have. It was just a lot to take in and I wish there would have been about 20 more pages showing the aftermath of everything. Han is going to fly around the galaxy with a princess who will become his loving wife someday, finding the happiness he deserves - and Qi'ra will be in a position of power and influence, gaining riches and climbing the ladder just like she deserves. It'll all work out for them in the end. That makes MOST WANTED a more enjoyable and heartbreaking novel to read, I think. But that's just my experience. 4.75 stars!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Super fun "prequel" to the Solo movie, showing how Han and Qi'ra first started working together! Would actually stand alone as a sci fi book without the "hook" of Star Wars, which is rare! But Carson is just such a slick writer, of course she managed to pull off both a fun YA book and a fun Star Wars book without either suffering.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nicis

    Based only on this book (I haven't seen Solo yet) I FREAKING LOVE QI'RA. Give me all the problematic faves. She's so smart, she's ambitious, she has done a lot to survive and she really cares about Han, even if it takes a lot of danger fot that to happen. She's what Rey could have been with a little more personality. Han is amazing too, smart, always the lucky one, the bad with words that makes friends everywhere he goes. There's a lot of mumbo jumbo he doesn't believe, but he's the most loyal an Based only on this book (I haven't seen Solo yet) I FREAKING LOVE QI'RA. Give me all the problematic faves. She's so smart, she's ambitious, she has done a lot to survive and she really cares about Han, even if it takes a lot of danger fot that to happen. She's what Rey could have been with a little more personality. Han is amazing too, smart, always the lucky one, the bad with words that makes friends everywhere he goes. There's a lot of mumbo jumbo he doesn't believe, but he's the most loyal and soft character. We can actually see him on space for the first time ever and after all the misery that his life has been, it's a scene quite beautiful. All in all, this book was a lot of fun and the perfect worldbuilding for the last movie in the Star Wars universe.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jim C

    Actual rating is 3.5 stars This book is a prequel to the Solo movie. This tells the story of how Han and Qi'ra become friends and how their dream is formed of leaving Corellia. I thought the movie was decent and it was worth watching but it doesn't rank with the greats of this franchise. So a prequel based on that movie didn't exactly scream "must read". This book exceeded my expectations. The strength of this book is the characters. One can imagine Han evolve into the character we all know with h Actual rating is 3.5 stars This book is a prequel to the Solo movie. This tells the story of how Han and Qi'ra become friends and how their dream is formed of leaving Corellia. I thought the movie was decent and it was worth watching but it doesn't rank with the greats of this franchise. So a prequel based on that movie didn't exactly scream "must read". This book exceeded my expectations. The strength of this book is the characters. One can imagine Han evolve into the character we all know with his "fly by the seat of his pants" attitude. I am impressed that the author made me care about Qi'ra considering I did not care for her in the movie. There also was a new character, Tuulo, introduced that stole the show. As for the story, it fits into the canon that Disney is building. I liked the message of this book as we get to see how our characters begin to dream of a better life even though right now their situation is not the happiest. This was a quick read that does border on the YA genre. I have not been overly impressed with the new crop of Star Wars novels (there are a couple of exceptions that have been terrific). This one is better than the majority of the new canon and it was a nice little side adventure in this universe.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Allison Tebo

    I . . . don't know how I feel.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Justine

    I had a hard time getting into the beginning but my desire to know all the things about Qi'ra saw me through. Really liked all the turns the plot took and the way the relationship between them wasn't forced at all. I'm excited to see Solo again with this backstory in mind!

  11. 5 out of 5

    DiscoSpacePanther

    Despite being YA, this novel was so much better than Last Shot: A Han and Lando Novel . Whilst that book was an incoherent mess, Most Wanted tells a tight, well focused story about Han and Qi'ra during their youth in the city of Coronet on Corellia, when they were part of Lady Proxima's white worms. The story fits in very well with the events early on in Solo: A Star Wars Story - the characters and the setting match closely, with the Fagin-like Lady Proxima running her gang of sewer urchins wit Despite being YA, this novel was so much better than Last Shot: A Han and Lando Novel . Whilst that book was an incoherent mess, Most Wanted tells a tight, well focused story about Han and Qi'ra during their youth in the city of Coronet on Corellia, when they were part of Lady Proxima's white worms. The story fits in very well with the events early on in Solo: A Star Wars Story - the characters and the setting match closely, with the Fagin-like Lady Proxima running her gang of sewer urchins with an iron fist. Importantly, Han still felt like Han, even whilst lacking the the galaxy-weariness and cynicism that he had in Star Wars. We get lots on insight into the inner workings of Qi'ra's mind, which really adds to the layers of character we see revealed in the movie. It might not be what everyone wants or expects from a Young Han Solo story (many of the Legends fans are still wedded to A. C. Crispin's Han Solo Trilogy of The Paradise Snare , The Hutt Gambit , and Rebel Dawn ), but I would recommend it to YA Star Wars fans, and anyone who wants to expand their Star Wars canon knowledge.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    Ugh. Oh, wait this is a Star Wars review, let me try that again... I've got a bad feeling about this. Yeah, that was better. "Most Wanted" is a prequel to the "Solo" film that just came out. It's how Han and the queen of dragons became friends. The story is slight and mostly inoffensive. The most frustrating part was that clearly there is no quality control at Disney or Lucasfilm for these things. Han is introduced to the Force and Jedi many times in this book. The basic concepts of the same are Ugh. Oh, wait this is a Star Wars review, let me try that again... I've got a bad feeling about this. Yeah, that was better. "Most Wanted" is a prequel to the "Solo" film that just came out. It's how Han and the queen of dragons became friends. The story is slight and mostly inoffensive. The most frustrating part was that clearly there is no quality control at Disney or Lucasfilm for these things. Han is introduced to the Force and Jedi many times in this book. The basic concepts of the same are even explained to him. So it makes no DAMN sense that he would be so clueless about them in "A New Hope." "But Joe, maybe Han was lying!" To what end? For what reason? Small potatoes maybe, but why read these books if not to expand my knowledge of the Star Wars universe. Not undo and undermine things that have already been established. You can change Star Wars facts and events going forwards, not backwards guys. Unless...you're doing a reboot. Was this a reboot? Somebody get J.J. Abrams on the phone!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jaime K

    2.5 stars I went into this hoping it'd be good. I was really banking it on being better than what I've read is part of the "Solo" plot. And most wasn't all that bad. Qi'ra and Han begin by contesting to be Head of their gang, run by Lady Proxima. It's weird to me from the start, because they're oldest among some Rodians and other humans, yet the White Worms don't like to have a Rodian or human be their Head. I like how there are other gangs, and the three butt heads. Kaldana is very put-together, bu 2.5 stars I went into this hoping it'd be good. I was really banking it on being better than what I've read is part of the "Solo" plot. And most wasn't all that bad. Qi'ra and Han begin by contesting to be Head of their gang, run by Lady Proxima. It's weird to me from the start, because they're oldest among some Rodians and other humans, yet the White Worms don't like to have a Rodian or human be their Head. I like how there are other gangs, and the three butt heads. Kaldana is very put-together, but Doid Gotra being all over is scary. I am on the fence about how I feel about Han not having a surname. I do like that he learns from experience, including with non-Basic languages. Qi'ra wears a "beautiful new skirt" and a "beautiful red shirt;" geez, I get it, it's all beautiful. The kids (teens? young adults? their age isn't known until about halfway through) are sheltered. Qi'ra never realized how beautiful her planet was before this. She and Han have never fired a blaster. They're uneducated streetrats. The flirting between them is just that, typical of a brief crush or infatuation. I'm glad it's not an obvious/"necessary" romance. The sentience of the droids becomes real old real quick. They're treated like any other being ("Oh, you two know each other?") which makes no sense. ~ There are "dog biscuits" which is odd to me. ~ The droid Tool "is a huge tool," which has two meanings, one of which makes utterly no sense. ~The word "brunet" is spelled oddly for me. Apparently, that is a real spelling. Though looking it up confuses me again, as it's a masculine spelling and the character is a woman. ~ "Screwed" and "screw it" really took me out of the 'verse. Why is 'forget it' not good enough? I do really like how the poorer people become, the more they turn to religion. People need to have a reason for hope, and Carson shows that well. More review and reactions under spoiler cut. (view spoiler)[ CorSec! I'm so out of the loop, I don't even know/remember if it's been mentioned in canon media before now, but I love that it's here. Tsuulo the Rodian is pretty cool, except for the Force business. He's too much like Chirrut in Rogue One in that regard, and annoys me Tool has a chest compartment! I had been mistaken about something at the end of chapter 6, and it wasn't made clear until quite a bit later. It was almost enough to make me stop reading. I'm glad I didn't, but it was close. OK so Han doesn't believe in religion but is cool with Tsuulo being "Force this" and "Force that." His being nonchalant about it is a bit OOC. Also with the writing: "Han didn't know about religion but he was sure that's not how the Force works." How the kriff would he know? Also, that he doesn't know about religion does NOT need to be repeated 2-3 times in as many pages! He also says that religion/belief can't hurt. It's so unlike him. It's therefore overly obvious what happens to Tsuulo. Qi'ra is extremely drawn to riches. I bet that's a strong part of her character in Solo. Nubia is mentioned!! It's barely in Legends material, and I never noticed that before. That is a fantastic addition. I trust Han's gut more than I do the words on the page. (hide spoiler)] As a side note, there are some question marks in chapter 10 that were missing.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Steve Davala

    Not really sure what to think of this tale of Han before the "Solo" movie. It tells of his survival on the streets of Corellia and his intro to Qi'ra. I think what holds me back from a higher rating is that... nothing really happens. Yes, some intrigue and some double crossing, but nothing really "Solo-y." There are some references to the Force and how Han reacts to it from Episode IV, but meh. There's Han being Han (doing the right thing) but there's no "Solo" kind of feel. Like why does he hat Not really sure what to think of this tale of Han before the "Solo" movie. It tells of his survival on the streets of Corellia and his intro to Qi'ra. I think what holds me back from a higher rating is that... nothing really happens. Yes, some intrigue and some double crossing, but nothing really "Solo-y." There are some references to the Force and how Han reacts to it from Episode IV, but meh. There's Han being Han (doing the right thing) but there's no "Solo" kind of feel. Like why does he hate droids so much? Not here, he has a good friend who is a droid. What explains why he doesn't want to get involved in saving the princess on the Death Star and only focus on the reward? Not here, he tries to do a job and gets really pissy if his friends don't make it. I want to see Rogue Han. Yes, we know he comes around and does the right thing in the original trilogy, but why does he have to do this on the streets in the beginning? There's no growth there. Or if there is, he gets jaded and then learns to grow again sometime off screen and in another book. Oh, and the catch-phrase he uses in this book? Made me cringe every time. "When in doubt, brazen it out." Ugh. That's not his catch phrase. Calling people princess or kid or something, but not that. Oh well. It is a fun enough read and furthers the galaxy for the Solo movie, but don't expect to see to much new stuff here.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    I liked this book, it was good. Left you on a cliffhanger as to whether or not Han and Kira are a thing (but they kinda were in Solo, so I assume, but I wanted to know after watching Solo which is why I read this book, because I wanted a When Han Met Kira story. But it left the whole thing in that they didn’t end up together that When Harry Met Sally’s original script was left on (thank god they fixed it so Harry and Sally ended up together in the movie because how unsatisfying that would have b I liked this book, it was good. Left you on a cliffhanger as to whether or not Han and Kira are a thing (but they kinda were in Solo, so I assume, but I wanted to know after watching Solo which is why I read this book, because I wanted a When Han Met Kira story. But it left the whole thing in that they didn’t end up together that When Harry Met Sally’s original script was left on (thank god they fixed it so Harry and Sally ended up together in the movie because how unsatisfying that would have been)) so I guess what I am saying is it didn’t satisfy my Fangirl need for a Ship to set sail, but it was a good. That said, I have one little nitpick beyond this, how do street rats have such a vast vocabulary? Like picking up how to splice droids and speeders, I guess I can get. Picking up bits and pieces of other languages, I suppose. But Kira spit out some words (in her head and in her speech) that were like SAT level and seemed to use them well. Like whoa, street rats getting some test prep classes now or what?

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cambear

    A fun adventure that really gives more insight into the start of Han and Qi’ra’s relationship which is only briefly glimpsed in Solo: A Star Wars Story. Han’s goal during the movie is to get back to Qi’ra so it’s great to see their relationship from the beginning. Qi’ra is the main focus in this book. She’s smart, unsure, learning her limits and expanding her dreams. Han is impulsive, good-natured and just starting to charm his way around. They are an interesting mix with a couple of additional a A fun adventure that really gives more insight into the start of Han and Qi’ra’s relationship which is only briefly glimpsed in Solo: A Star Wars Story. Han’s goal during the movie is to get back to Qi’ra so it’s great to see their relationship from the beginning. Qi’ra is the main focus in this book. She’s smart, unsure, learning her limits and expanding her dreams. Han is impulsive, good-natured and just starting to charm his way around. They are an interesting mix with a couple of additional and unusual friends on this adventure. The Star Wars novels always provide more background on something connected to the movies. In this case, there’s the whole backstory for Han and Qi’ra but also more about Corellia, Lady Proxima and all the rival factions. It’s a fully-fleshed out and fun adventure that stands on its own as well. Now if we could just understand why everyone on Corellia has a British accent except Han...? Thanks to Disney Hyperion for providing a copy of the book for review.

  17. 4 out of 5

    N.E.C.C.

    This was a great fast paced adventure. Rae Carson did an amazing job here. She nailed Han in every aspect. Qi'ra was awesome, i liked her a lot in the movie (Solo: A Star Wars Story) and here you get so much more of her. The rest of the characters were also really good, my favourite being Tsuulo. The plot was simple and good, i liked it. You get to spend time on Corellia (which is always good) and learn how people live under imperial rule (which we've seen already but not on Corellia). The audioboo This was a great fast paced adventure. Rae Carson did an amazing job here. She nailed Han in every aspect. Qi'ra was awesome, i liked her a lot in the movie (Solo: A Star Wars Story) and here you get so much more of her. The rest of the characters were also really good, my favourite being Tsuulo. The plot was simple and good, i liked it. You get to spend time on Corellia (which is always good) and learn how people live under imperial rule (which we've seen already but not on Corellia). The audiobook is narrated by Saskia Maarleveld and she is AWESOME!!!. She'is REALLY good with accents. Overall, a fast paced adventure, fun and easy to read, with a lot of character development (maybe not that much for Han but we already know how Han is so...) for Qi'ra. If you liked the movie (Solo: A Star Wars Story) you'll like this book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    John

    I actually finished reading this a few days ago. I'm a little late with my review, but as you may have noticed, I gave it 5 stars, not because it's a perfect book, but because I enjoyed reading it so much. Carson has a very good grasp of her characters, including Han Solo. It really felt like I was reading about a young version of the character we know so well from the three original Star wars films. Not only that, but the story was interesting, well paced, believable within it's Star wars setti I actually finished reading this a few days ago. I'm a little late with my review, but as you may have noticed, I gave it 5 stars, not because it's a perfect book, but because I enjoyed reading it so much. Carson has a very good grasp of her characters, including Han Solo. It really felt like I was reading about a young version of the character we know so well from the three original Star wars films. Not only that, but the story was interesting, well paced, believable within it's Star wars setting, and even a bit clever. It did not have that far ranging scope that many Star Wars stories do, because out of necessity, it takes place almost exclusively on one planet. That said, it was very interesting to get a much more intimate look at life on that one space rock than we most usually do. It's pretty easy reading as it is a YA novel, but it was so much fun, I would recommend it to anyone.

  19. 5 out of 5

    May

    2.5 stars means I liked it a lot more than the movie?? Preliminary thoughts: - I really like that Carson was able to be a little more subtle about the character traits she was obviously asked to portray— like Qi’ra’s attraction to wealth— and this was often a really good example of show-not-tell. - The plot was basic and didn’t have a lot of interesting variations on the “run away from things” storyline, but it was done pretty well all things considered. Tbh though I’ve already forgotten half of 2.5 stars means I liked it a lot more than the movie?? Preliminary thoughts: - I really like that Carson was able to be a little more subtle about the character traits she was obviously asked to portray— like Qi’ra’s attraction to wealth— and this was often a really good example of show-not-tell. - The plot was basic and didn’t have a lot of interesting variations on the “run away from things” storyline, but it was done pretty well all things considered. Tbh though I’ve already forgotten half of what happened and I just finished it. - Loving that this story wasn’t bogged down by a super poorly timed romance, and instead focused on the importance of trust and friendship - The audiobook has fun sound effects so A+ to that

  20. 4 out of 5

    Shelley

    *Source* Publisher *Genre* Young Adult / Science Fiction *Rating* 3.5-4 *Thoughts* Most Wanted, by author Rae Carson, is part of the Star Wars Disney Canon series. Set before the events of Solo: A Star Wars Story, Han and Qi'ra don't have a lot in common other than not having a lot. The story is set on the Planet of Corellia, which is basically a run-down, backwater planet whose main industry is building ships and retiring older models. Han and Qi'ra are street kids on the planet, doing whatever it *Source* Publisher *Genre* Young Adult / Science Fiction *Rating* 3.5-4 *Thoughts* Most Wanted, by author Rae Carson, is part of the Star Wars Disney Canon series. Set before the events of Solo: A Star Wars Story, Han and Qi'ra don't have a lot in common other than not having a lot. The story is set on the Planet of Corellia, which is basically a run-down, backwater planet whose main industry is building ships and retiring older models. Han and Qi'ra are street kids on the planet, doing whatever it takes to get by, dreaming of something more. *Full Review @ Gizmos Reviews* http://gizmosreviews.blogspot.com/201...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    A younger Solo, with a much different story than the one A.C. Crispin told. To be fair, Crispin was given a veritable free reign with his pen and paper. Carson had to contend with a preset timeline thanks to the lackluster Solo movie that was in production during the composition of this book. The lack of creative freedom shows. Still, even with the limitations cemented firmly in place, "Most Wanted" is a decent enough story with corny dialogue nevertheless relevant to a couple of just-turned-adu A younger Solo, with a much different story than the one A.C. Crispin told. To be fair, Crispin was given a veritable free reign with his pen and paper. Carson had to contend with a preset timeline thanks to the lackluster Solo movie that was in production during the composition of this book. The lack of creative freedom shows. Still, even with the limitations cemented firmly in place, "Most Wanted" is a decent enough story with corny dialogue nevertheless relevant to a couple of just-turned-adults. Check it out from your library, DNB.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ceilidh

    I don't really read Star Wars tie-in novels but I loved Solo so much that I had to splurge for this one. It's way more about Qi'ra than Han, but gives beautiful depth to her arc as the struggling street kid who wants to do good but whose brain leans more heavily towards pragmatism. If you liked Solo as much as I did - and that's a lot - and want a highly readable YA adventure prequel to fill in some gaps, this is for you.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Walcott

    This story nicely fleshes out Han and Qi'ra's characters before the events of "Solo". Carson does a wonderful job of mapping out the characters beliefs and motivations, creating a great sense of character depth that enhances the characters we already know and love, all while surrounding the central the protagonist in a captivating and emotional adventure.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Victoria [deathlypeonies]

    Super fun and easy read! Han is spot on and so so precious and I enjoyed seeing qi’ra’s perspective because it helps explain her actions in the solo movie :)

  25. 5 out of 5

    kerrycat

    "What's a Jet-Eye?" "Jedi. I've met a few. But they're all dead now." great big sigh

  26. 4 out of 5

    Caleb Hobbick

    Loved it!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    I pretty much go into all of these expecting sub-mediocrity these days, but after Last Shot, this was a pleasant surprise. It's a simple, competently told story with a clear anchor in the emotional through line of both POV characters. And it provides much-needed insight into the world they live in before the movie starts and how they conceive of those lives. The story itself is fine, nothing special but not particularly stupid as these things go. The fun part is really just watching each charact I pretty much go into all of these expecting sub-mediocrity these days, but after Last Shot, this was a pleasant surprise. It's a simple, competently told story with a clear anchor in the emotional through line of both POV characters. And it provides much-needed insight into the world they live in before the movie starts and how they conceive of those lives. The story itself is fine, nothing special but not particularly stupid as these things go. The fun part is really just watching each character grow to like and understand the other two, and in the process learned more about themselves. One of the biggest issues with Solo for me was that it lacked the kind of grounding "life at home" sequence that most Star Wars protagonists get. Most Wanted is exactly that, although it's obviously a bit more of an adventure than a slice of life story – we're apparently still far from the day when a Star Wars book can neglect adventure. Qi'ra even has essentially the same home as Rey: an abandoned ship in a graveyard of old ships. It even has a can with dried flowers, too. Han very much resembles his portrayal in Solo, to the extent that he feels even more purely good than he does in much of the movie. It's interesting to compare him to Luke in A New Hope, a character at a similar age and with similar dreams but with a very different class experience. We don't tend to think of Luke's family as affluent in any way, partly because of the way Uncle Owen talks about their bottom line, but like… they are a two-parent home that owns land and more than one speeder and can afford to just buy a droid. The way Luke think about his future is very middle-class, in a sense: he takes for granted everything he has, pines for novelty and adventure, claims he has political principles when asked but seems willing enough to forgo them to get what he wants. He rarely shows empathy and his heroic actions feel less like generous sacrifices than the fulfillment of a personal fantasy. Han has almost nothing, and he is always willing to give it away. What Qi'ra sees as his primary character trait is not his brazen charisma or his luck and intuition or his sharp humor, but his empathy, the way he sees everyone has a person and treats them how he thinks people should be treated. That angle is consistent with the movie, but it feels a bit more naïve there, and less profound. In part that's because the book goes out of its way to create opportunities for Han to demonstrate his empathy and generosity. But it's also because seeing it through Qir'a's eyes, and seeing her feel almost uncomfortable comparing it to her own behavior, is fairly powerful. And it makes the contrast between this young Han and the man he grows up to be all the more bittersweet. Qi’ra is unambiguously protagonist of the story, though Han has his moments as well. The movie walks a tough line, keeping her a bit aloof and distant, enough to suggest she could betray Han, but not so much that she comes across as a mercenary, a user. Most Wanted does a lot to contextualize what must be going on behind all of those inscrutable smiles. She doesn't think of herself as a good person not through any malice or ill will but simply because she didn't think the boundaries of her life allowed for that kind of ambition. Charity isn't relevant for people who have nothing to give. Seeing Han treat people as more than what they can do for her (or to her) shows her that she was wrong, that empathy always matters even if you are desperate. And that emotional insight helps her avoid a bad decision she once would have jumped at. None of that makes her decisions in the movie obvious, but it gives them a much broader sense of possible depth. Yes, she was poor and therefore willing to do shameful things to win a better life; she lived in the sewers, so you can't blame her for wanting to look posh. But with the context of the book, you know that it wasn't easy for her to throw people under the bus to get that status. Perhaps she found ways to exert that empathy in her work for Crimson Dawn. Or perhaps things just got so much worse for her with Han gone that she had to take the chance, less from greed than out of duress. Either way, it makes her feel less enigmatic and fickle, to the extent she did in the first place. Her and Han are maybe the closest the franchise has come to effectively reframing its binary morality in terms of personality and incentives. One thing I'm kind of confused about is the droid situation. This is less an aspect of the book than it is an apparent shift in the way canon is handling this issue in general, and specifically in contrast with Last Shot. Droids have always been the most extreme example of the Star Wars signature retro-futurist paradox. Just as characters can call each other from across the galaxy but the Internet doesn't seem to exist, it's possible to create a fully sentient machine brain, but practically none of the implications of that discovery seem to exist. Despite a few exceptions and legends that kind of proves the rule, artificial intelligence in Star Wars exists in modular but largely constant mechanical bodies, which do not meaningfully imitate organics. Their role in the story is not to emphasize the blurred line between artificial and biological sentience. Instead, the main feature of droids, other than their bodies, is that their identity is defined by programmed loyalties rather than personal principle. They are idealized, immortal, devoted slaves. The material around Solo, taking its cue from L3, questions all of that constantly. Every droid in Most Wanted has its own aesthetic and political preferences, its own ambitions for personal self-actualization. The movie goes so far as to make devotion to their assigned tasks something imposed externally, as opposed to the more nuanced dynamic of the restraining bolt in A New Hope. That’s fucked on one hand because it implies practically every character on all sides is comfortable owning slaves. But it also raises a lot of difficult questions. Where do the apparent differences in "class consciousness" among droids come from? How much variation in droid intelligence is there, and how does that affect their ability to define their own lives? Like, what made all of the droids in the Kessel mine so prepared to rise up the way they did? The Solo tie-ins have tried to rectify the anomaly of having L3 be the only droid who ever realized droids were slaves by creating a revolutionary group called the Droid Gotra. In Most Wanted, Han has droid friends who support the Gotra, and therefore he believes that they are a positive political force, not terrorists, as some of his friends believe. In Last Shot, Han doesn't seem to trust or support them at all. The more surprising thing, though, was just that they had a much bigger role in this book, which had much less direct relevance to their thematic role in the universe.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    The story follows Han and Qi’ra, and is set before ‘Solo – A Star Wars Story’, although there is no real hint of timelines. Given their relationship in the movie, where they are in the White Worm Gang etc, it is obviously a bit before the movie. The two of them are players in one of the crime syndicates on Corellia’s underworld, both with their own set of talents. Han is quick on his feet, learns quickly, is able to talk fast, think fast, and get himself out of basically any situation with a bit The story follows Han and Qi’ra, and is set before ‘Solo – A Star Wars Story’, although there is no real hint of timelines. Given their relationship in the movie, where they are in the White Worm Gang etc, it is obviously a bit before the movie. The two of them are players in one of the crime syndicates on Corellia’s underworld, both with their own set of talents. Han is quick on his feet, learns quickly, is able to talk fast, think fast, and get himself out of basically any situation with a bit of smooth talking, including several languages. Qi’ra on the other hand, is a bit more refined, slower in the talking, but she is able to come up with the plans, and is highly intelligent. She is also highly skilled, having quickly learnt multiple skills to help her out of many situations. Each is brought before the head of the Syndicate, separately, and told that if they succeed in a secret mission, they will not only get a reward, but be made head of their group, a coveted position as it comes with special rewards and a position of power which everyone wants. This turns into a rather amusing tale as both set about to accomplish their tasks, soon realising that they have been set near impossible jobs, and, that the other has also been promised the same thing. When it all goes horribly wrong, and the two of them are nearly killed in the outcome. Suddenly Han and Qi’ra are (you guessed it!), Corellia’s ‘Most Wanted’, on the run, with a massive secret, no one to help them, and no idea what to do. This however is where the two of them got their beginnings, and very quickly, with the help of their friend Tsuulo, the 3 of them have to try and not only clear their names, but stop an all out war. This is a really fun story. For Star Wars fans, it gives a bit more background of the characters from ‘Solo – A Star Wars Story’, most certainly Han and Qi’ra. It also provides a bit more background of the White Worms, and the underground of Corellia, as well as all the goings on of the planet. For a long time, people have just considered that the Empire ruled Corellia, and that it pumped out Imperial Warships, but these stories (the book and the movie), show that there is a much different side, and that the Empire did not have as firmer grip on the planet as it would have liked, especially in the early days. This is definitely one of the better books to have been released in the ‘New’ series of books since the reset. It has some decent characters (although obviously it did have a good baseline to work from given the movie), and the storyline wasn’t too bad. The story was a lot of fun, and it did provide some decent background for fans. If you are a fan, you will enjoy it, if you liked the movie, you will definitely get a kick out of it, otherwise, well, I don’t know. But there are a lot of Star Wars fans out there!!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Judah-Ben Morales

    It took me 2 months to make up my mind to start reading this book. I guess the only reason why I did was because I got my copy of Thrawn Alliances and didn't want to start reading it leaving this blank space. Actually, my faith in Star Wars was shattered after the debacle named The Last Jedi. Solo was very good, I really liked it, but it was not good enough to raise the stakes after the huge TLJ catastrophe. But the overwhelming shadow of Thrawn and the outstandingly good news in SDCC of the Clo It took me 2 months to make up my mind to start reading this book. I guess the only reason why I did was because I got my copy of Thrawn Alliances and didn't want to start reading it leaving this blank space. Actually, my faith in Star Wars was shattered after the debacle named The Last Jedi. Solo was very good, I really liked it, but it was not good enough to raise the stakes after the huge TLJ catastrophe. But the overwhelming shadow of Thrawn and the outstandingly good news in SDCC of the Clone Wars comeback gave me back some of my lost faith. So now, to the review: Most Wanted has very strong points. Like the Solo movie, Han Solo is NOT the main attraction here, but his "friend" Qi'ra. The pacing is very good, cannot say it is"action-packed" but it is certainly not boring. Oftentimes the odds are a bit too strained to favor the main characters, especially considering that by this time they are only teenagers, "eighteen-ish", to quote from the book. The narrative is very cinematic, which may be good or bad depending on what you expect from the book: whether to read a prequel/tie-in to the movie or to simply get to know the characters a little better. The characterization is very close to the movies; the Han Solo described here more closely resembles Alden Ehrenreich than Harrison Ford's, but I think that is the idea at this point in the timeline. And, as happened in the movie, Qi'ra is an interesting character, failing again to reach the"fascinating" category. No large cameos here, which isn't bad for me, because no matter how much we fans love to see a character from other media it must be remembered that this is an entire galaxy we're talking about, so what are the odds of meeting someone specific? Regarding planet-building, although all of the account takes place in Corellia or its surrounding space, the planet is described in such detail that it is not hard to imagine the awful conditions in which lowlifes and forsaken people lived on this Imperial-controlled world. So my rating is 3.5 stars, rounded to 4 stars for Goodreads purposes. You won't miss a considerable chunk of Han's life if you don't read this, but you will learn more from Qi'ra (and Corellia's underworld) if you do.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cavak

    Not the greatest and not the worst. Most Wanted expects you to have some knowledge of Star Wars beforehand. I've read other licensed works that tried harder to guide readers who are not familiar with the IP's lore, and the writing couldn't be clearer that this was not one of them (the Solo film logo and recommendation is even on the front cover!). Descriptions of the world have laser-guided relevance, characterizations are basic, and there's the barest of introductions to our main cast. Because Not the greatest and not the worst. Most Wanted expects you to have some knowledge of Star Wars beforehand. I've read other licensed works that tried harder to guide readers who are not familiar with the IP's lore, and the writing couldn't be clearer that this was not one of them (the Solo film logo and recommendation is even on the front cover!). Descriptions of the world have laser-guided relevance, characterizations are basic, and there's the barest of introductions to our main cast. Because everyone knows how all the aliens are like in Star Wars, right? Dressed behind the obvious film plug is a swift jump into an adequately written organized crime story. Carson's writing has the easy-to-absorb YA approach that will likely draw many people to the plot. You could probably finish reading it without extensive knowledge of Star Wars, which is an often overlooked accomplishment for any author tasked for a licensed work. At the same time, it's the sort of heist story that's been told so many times that it's predictable. Worse, we already know that Han and Qi'ra will survive whatever danger they encounter in this novel so it drained the tension away from the life-or-death situations they go through. This sort of story could still work if the novel had a deeper meaning behind the irony, but it fell flat for me. Do you expect a prequel novel to tell you something new about the characters that wasn't in the film? Well, I would too. But Most Wanted is sadly more about the original adventure covered within the novel. As far as origins go, it does cover Qi'ra's past and her relationship with Han. Han himself is lacking on that end (on purpose, I can imagine, so that Disney could find more gaps of his life to fill with even more extra materials). And it says a little more about Lady Proxima and her gang, though not much more. If Qi'ra's your aim, then feel free to take a stab at this book.

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