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There are a thousand stories in the land of Narnia, and the first is about to be told in an extraordinary motion picture, The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, from Walt Disney Pictures and Walden Media. In the never-ending war between good and evil, The Chronicles of Narnia set the stage for battles of epic proportions. Some take place in vast fie There are a thousand stories in the land of Narnia, and the first is about to be told in an extraordinary motion picture, The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, from Walt Disney Pictures and Walden Media. In the never-ending war between good and evil, The Chronicles of Narnia set the stage for battles of epic proportions. Some take place in vast fields, where the forces of light and darkness clash. But other battles occur within the small chambers of the heart and are equally decisive. Journeys to the ends of the world, fantastic creatures, betrayals, heroic deeds and friendships won and lost -- all come together in an unforgettable world of magic. So step into Underland in search of a lost prince. The sixth volume in The Chronicles of Narnia® The Silver Chair Narnia ... where giants wreak havoc ... where evil weaves a spell ... where enchantment rules. Through dangers untold and caverns deep and dark, a noble band of friends are sent to rescue a prince held captive. But their mission to Underland brings them face-to-face with an evil more beautiful and more deadly than they ever expected.


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There are a thousand stories in the land of Narnia, and the first is about to be told in an extraordinary motion picture, The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, from Walt Disney Pictures and Walden Media. In the never-ending war between good and evil, The Chronicles of Narnia set the stage for battles of epic proportions. Some take place in vast fie There are a thousand stories in the land of Narnia, and the first is about to be told in an extraordinary motion picture, The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, from Walt Disney Pictures and Walden Media. In the never-ending war between good and evil, The Chronicles of Narnia set the stage for battles of epic proportions. Some take place in vast fields, where the forces of light and darkness clash. But other battles occur within the small chambers of the heart and are equally decisive. Journeys to the ends of the world, fantastic creatures, betrayals, heroic deeds and friendships won and lost -- all come together in an unforgettable world of magic. So step into Underland in search of a lost prince. The sixth volume in The Chronicles of Narnia® The Silver Chair Narnia ... where giants wreak havoc ... where evil weaves a spell ... where enchantment rules. Through dangers untold and caverns deep and dark, a noble band of friends are sent to rescue a prince held captive. But their mission to Underland brings them face-to-face with an evil more beautiful and more deadly than they ever expected.

30 review for Fauteuil D Argent (The Chronicles of Narnia (Publication Order) #4)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    I started reading this with my boy ages ago, but I never got around to marking it as finished here on Goodreads. Generally speaking, I enjoyed reading him the book, and he liked hearing it. I have a nostalgia for the Narnia Chronicles, too. And that makes these books a little sweeter for me. My younger boy (age 3.5 at the time of reading) enjoyed it too. Especially some of the more action-oriented scenes, and the stuff underground.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Silver Chair (Chronicles of Narnia, #4), C. S. Lewis The Silver Chair is a children's fantasy novel by C. S. Lewis, published by Geoffrey Bles in 1953. It was the fourth published of seven novels in The Chronicles of Narnia (1950–1956); it is volume six in recent editions, which are sequenced according to Narnian history. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: سال 2002 میلادی عنوان: ماجراهای نارنیا 4: صندلی نقره ای جادویی؛ نویسنده: سی.اس. لوئیس؛ مترجم: شهناز انوشیروانی؛ تهران، محیط، 1376؛ در 184 ص؛ شابک: ایکس -9 The Silver Chair (Chronicles of Narnia, #4), C. S. Lewis The Silver Chair is a children's fantasy novel by C. S. Lewis, published by Geoffrey Bles in 1953. It was the fourth published of seven novels in The Chronicles of Narnia (1950–1956); it is volume six in recent editions, which are sequenced according to Narnian history. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: سال 2002 میلادی عنوان: ماجراهای نارنیا 4: صندلی نقره ای جادویی؛ نویسنده: سی.اس. لوئیس؛ مترجم: شهناز انوشیروانی؛ تهران، محیط، 1376؛ در 184 ص؛ شابک: ایکس -96462461؛ عنوان روی جلد: صندلی جاویی؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان انگلیسی - سده 20 م مترجم: امیر اقتداری؛ منوچهر کریم زاده؛ تهران، هرمی، کیمیا، 1379؛ در شش و 229 ص؛ شابک: 9647100086؛ چاپ سوم 1385؛ مترجم: پیمان اسماعیلیان؛ ویراستار: شهرام رجب زاده؛ تهران، قدیانی، 1387، در 304 ص؛ شابک: 9789644178542؛ چاپ سوم 1394؛ مترجم: محمدرضا شمس؛ تهران، پنجره، 1387، در 200 ص؛ شابک: 9789648890891؛ نقل از متن کتاب: مدتهای درازی است که من، صدای آواز نشنیده ام. یا رقص، و فشفشه ندیده ام. چرا باید اینطور باشد؟ همه فکر میکنند، من طلسم شده ام. اگر میفهمیدم چرا این همه بار میکشم؟ خوشبخت بودم. پایان ص 187 کتاب. ا. شربیانی

  3. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Markus

    Ah, the strange joys of Narnia! How is a middle-aged feminist nonbeliever supposed to feel about this contradictory volume? Pro: Jill Pole is a strong, active, fun, funny, vigorous girl that any reader, male or female, will be happy to have as a protagonist. Con: Jill's old enough to be active, but young enough not to be a sexual being. Which is clearly the only reason Lewis is comfortable having her around, because: Con: Once again, Lewis only allows grown women as characters when they're scary, Ah, the strange joys of Narnia! How is a middle-aged feminist nonbeliever supposed to feel about this contradictory volume? Pro: Jill Pole is a strong, active, fun, funny, vigorous girl that any reader, male or female, will be happy to have as a protagonist. Con: Jill's old enough to be active, but young enough not to be a sexual being. Which is clearly the only reason Lewis is comfortable having her around, because: Con: Once again, Lewis only allows grown women as characters when they're scary, evil, beautiful, and seductive in equal parts. In this volume, the villain is the brilliant, ruthless Queen of the Underworld. Pro: Jill is a fully developed character who shows that kids can be strong and important without being paragons of virtue. One of the lines I remembered all my life after reading this book as a child is her reply to Aslan when he asks her why she was standing so near the edge of a cliff (and putting both herself and her friend in danger in the process). "I was showing off, Sir." I love how she says this, without flinching. She messed up, and there's nothing to do but own it. Pro: Because of moments like the above, Jill is more enjoyable to follow on her adventures than Lucy. I love Lucy, but she's cute and sweet and pretty much flawless. Jill gets tired, impatient, sick to her stomach with fear, sulky, and unreasonably angry. She also knows when to fight and when to run. I can relate to that. Con: This is the only full-length story of Jill's adventures. (The Last Battle so does not count. More about that later. Like, in another review.) Con: Quite aside from the relatively passive sexism of Lewis' pitting pre-sexual girls against dangerously seductive full-grown female villains, he also displays active sexism in this book. At the very end, he makes a point of pointing out that the terrible, incompetent Head of Jill's awful boarding school is a woman. Literally. "And then the Head (who was, by the way, a woman)..." Really? Well, that explains everything. Pro: Lewis does some of his best characterization in this book. Minor spoiler: At one point, Jill, Eustace, and Puddleglum discover to their horror that the meat they've been eating was actually a talking beast. Their separate reactions as they put down their forks are brilliantly described: "Jill, who was new to that world, was sorry for the poor stag and thought it was rotten of the giants to have killed him. [Eustace] Scrubb, who had been in that world before and had at least one Talking beast as his dear friend, felt horrified; as you might feel about a murder. But Puddleglum, who was Narnian born, was sick and faint, and felt as you would feel if you found you had eaten a baby." Con: Once again, Lewis backs the wrong horse, historically speaking. Jill and Eustace are together on this adventure because they go to the same school. Yes! Really! Can you believe it? Boys and girls, attending school together! What's next??? Pro: It's kind of funny to think that someone as brilliant as Lewis could fall so cleanly into the losing camp on this issue. Pro: Lots of Aslan. Con: As a symbol of the Christian God, he's not at his best here. For instance, he tells Jill at the beginning of her adventures, "Here on the mountain I have spoken to you clearly: I will not often do so down in Narnia." Even as a child and certainly now, my first thought was, "Why?" If you already accept divine inscrutability as necessary or at least inevitable, this flies fine; if you don't, this doesn't help. Pro: Puddleglum is one of the finest fantasy characters ever. His name and his "tells" are Dickensian in their genius, but he never falls into reflexive predictability. He's a weird, quirky, deeply appealing hero. Pro: Happy ending for every kid who's ever been bullied at school. Conclusion: Once again, Narnia is awesome no matter how old and skeptical you get.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Daniella

    Finally, a proper novel! Thank you, Mr. Lewis. Sixth time's the charm, eh? The Silver Chair is my favorite out of all the Narnia books. Not only does it have all the usual elements of this wonderful, rich fantasy world Lewis created, but the characters are better, at least in my opinion, the story feels less contrived, and it has the added benefit of being a proper novel. That is to say, it has: a) an actual plot; b) an identifiable climactic point; and c) a clear, concise denouement. For once, I Finally, a proper novel! Thank you, Mr. Lewis. Sixth time's the charm, eh? The Silver Chair is my favorite out of all the Narnia books. Not only does it have all the usual elements of this wonderful, rich fantasy world Lewis created, but the characters are better, at least in my opinion, the story feels less contrived, and it has the added benefit of being a proper novel. That is to say, it has: a) an actual plot; b) an identifiable climactic point; and c) a clear, concise denouement. For once, I wasn't left scratching my head at the end and going, "What the hell was the point of that?" In this book, we're reunited with Eustace, the Pevensies' cousin, who has turned into an all right guy since we first met him in The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. Pity how he's kind of bland now that he's not an insufferable git anymore. Fortunately, it wasn't Eustace, but his schoolmate Jill who really made the book for me. Jill is a modern sort of girl; she has new age hippie parents who send her to a new age hippie school, and though Mr. Lewis obviously didn't seem to think much of it, I rather think it did her some good. Unlike the Pevensie girls, who had a tendency to be ninnies and were very much girls of their time, Jill is a pretty level-headed kid, and neither expects nor receives any particularly special treatment on account of being a girl. She's a real, honest-to-god herione, who takes a--if not the--central role in the proceedings, rather than just sort of standing around observing while the boys do all the important stuff. Girl protagonists, for the win! I love it. Also, I feel it's worth mentioning that Jill using the sort of behaviors, if a bit exaggerated, that annoyed me about Lucy and Susan to trick the giants of Harfang, and with no small amount of disgust, amused me greatly. Maybe Lewis finally got the memo that post-war girls were a different breed. But even though I rather adored Jill, I think my favorite character--not just from this book, but out of the whole series--has to be Puddleglum the Marsh-wiggle. God, what a character! In my opinion, he has the most personality of any of Lewis's other characters. I love his upbeat sort of persistent doom and gloom, though that would seem to be an oxymoron, and his bravery and resolve despite his bleak, pessimistic outlook on life. I also loved that he was the only one who kept his head and saved the day through a heroic and selfless act when the witch was trying to enchant them. And I really hope we get to see him again in The Last Battle. The other thing I really enjoyed about The Silver Chair is that it's a Quest story. I mean, who doesn't like a good Quest story? If there's a story where so-and-so goes on a long, harrowing journey to complete a difficult and dangerous task, I am all about it. The only thing I didn't particularly like was that the journey itself didn't last long enough for my tastes, and the final conflict and resolution were a little too easy, but since it's a children's book, I'm willing to handwave those points. Definitely worth a read if you're into fantasy. And overall, if you were going to read just one of the Narnia books, I would recommend this one.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    I'm just going to give a generic opinion of the whole series. We love them. The end. Okay, so maybe I'll tell you that we read them outloud to the kids almost 2 years ago. So they were 5 going on 6 and 2. They all loved them and followed the plot and talked about the characters during their play. We're re-reading them again (now ages 8, 4 and 2) and they're loving them even more than the first time. All I hear, all day long is "For Narnia" and then they rush through the house, swords drawn. They hav I'm just going to give a generic opinion of the whole series. We love them. The end. Okay, so maybe I'll tell you that we read them outloud to the kids almost 2 years ago. So they were 5 going on 6 and 2. They all loved them and followed the plot and talked about the characters during their play. We're re-reading them again (now ages 8, 4 and 2) and they're loving them even more than the first time. All I hear, all day long is "For Narnia" and then they rush through the house, swords drawn. They have made Reepicheep figures out of pom-poms. They have conversations with the characters, "So Edmund, what do you think about the squirrel doing such and so?" I think this is a series of books that needs to be read over and over again.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    The 6th book in the Chronicles of Narnia, Eustace from The Voyage of the Dawn Treader is back and this time he brings along a schoolmate, Jill Pole to adventure in Narnia. I always had the impression that this particular book was scary or the darkest of the series. Blame it on the BBC series that I saw on YTV as a kid.I thought the Queen was going to be as dark and mean as the one from The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. However, I felt it was a bit boring.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Smartarse

    C.S. Lewis and I are never going to see eye to eye. First, because I've yet to feel any desire to participate in a seance, and second, I prefer my manipulative (religious) propaganda to be much more subtle in nature. And yet, despite all the above, I can't help but keep coming back to these books. What can I say? The appeal of a magical world in a wardrobe is irresistible. Yes, I knooooow it's not actually inside the wardrobe, yadda yadda yadda... I loved reading about the latest developments in C.S. Lewis and I are never going to see eye to eye. First, because I've yet to feel any desire to participate in a seance, and second, I prefer my manipulative (religious) propaganda to be much more subtle in nature. And yet, despite all the above, I can't help but keep coming back to these books. What can I say? The appeal of a magical world in a wardrobe is irresistible. Yes, I knooooow it's not actually inside the wardrobe, yadda yadda yadda... I loved reading about the latest developments in Narnia. I enjoyed riding owls alongside Jill, I giggled at Puddleglum's idea of pep-talk, especially when taking into account that he was considered to be rather upbeat by his kind: "Good morning, Guests," he said. "Though when I say good I don't mean it won't probably turn to rain or it might he snow, or fog, or thunder. You didn't get any sleep, I dare say. "Yes we did, though," said Jill. "We had a lovely night." "Ah," said the Marsh-wiggle, shaking his head. "I see you're making the best of a bad job. That's right. You've been well brought up, you have. You've learned to put a good face on things." ... and most of all, I enjoyed accompanying our three heroes on their quest, looking forward to the new lands they'd discover. So 2 stars for the awesome world building aspect and Puddleglum's (unintended) pep-talk through reverse psychology. If there was ever a story suffering of a "show, don't tell" deficiency, this was it. I can't remember a single instance where our characters weren't explicitly told important things. I generally don't much care about the manner a hero finds his clues, but this was excessive. And last, but most definitely not least, what is UP with the epilogue?! Admittedly this is not the only book wherein (view spoiler)[Narnia and the real world intertwine (hide spoiler)] , but The Magician's Nephew did it much better. In here it seems more like an afterthought; perhaps a bonus for a job well done. Score: 2/5 stars I took up reading this book with the lowest possible expectations. I was expecting religious propaganda, poorly veiled Christian morality and the obligatory black and white world-view. On the one hand, the latter should not come as a surprise given the target audience. On the other hand, the overly simplified morality made it difficult for me to take any character/development seriously. That said, I'm looking forward to the movie, and the portrayal of the different lands and people that the heroes encounter. Just please drop the epilogue. =============================================== Review of book 3: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader

  8. 4 out of 5

    P

    4.5 stars Such an epic ending ! In this book, Eustace and Jill travel back to Narnia. Jill meets Aslan and she's assigned to find the long-lost prince, there're signs to remember while they're wandering into the dangerous land. But Jill forgets all things Aslan tells her, that makes they lost themself in the giant city. They must find a way out. I found out that this book has the slow beginning, but when Eustace, Jill and Puddleglum travel to the Underworld, it gets better. IMO, The Silver Chair i 4.5 stars Such an epic ending ! In this book, Eustace and Jill travel back to Narnia. Jill meets Aslan and she's assigned to find the long-lost prince, there're signs to remember while they're wandering into the dangerous land. But Jill forgets all things Aslan tells her, that makes they lost themself in the giant city. They must find a way out. I found out that this book has the slow beginning, but when Eustace, Jill and Puddleglum travel to the Underworld, it gets better. IMO, The Silver Chair is nearly perfect as The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. How classic it is. This book kept my interest after it passed 60%, and the end was worth. ชอบเล่มนี้รองจาก The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe เลย ตอนท้ายสนุกมากๆ การผจญภัยน่าตื่นเต้น ไดอะล็อกดี ตอนจบก็ทรงพลัง ถ้าไม่ติดว่าช่วงแรกมันอืดๆไปหน่อยก็น่าจะได้คะแนนเต็มแล้ว ตอนก่อนจะอ่านก็คิดว่าถ้าาไม่มีปีเตอร์ เอ็ดมันด์ ซูซาน ลูซี่ หนังสือเล่มนี้ก็คงจะไม่สนุกแล้วหรือเปล่า ? แต่ไม่เลย ... แค่ยูสตาซกับจิลเราว่าก็คุมเนื้อเรื่องอยู่อยู่นะ ถึงจิลจะ whimper บ่อยไปหน่อย แต่หนังสือเล่มนี้ก็ดูมีอะไรดี รู้สึกว่าไม่ใช่นิทานก่อนนอนจ๋าเหมือนกับ The Horse and His Boy เพราะมีความแฟนตาซี การผจญภัยเข้ามาเสริมเลยทำให้อ่านสนุก รอภาพยนตร์เลยเรื่องนี้ ฉาก Underworld น่าจะมันส์สุดละ อ่านหนังสือละคิดภาพตามได้แบบอีพิคมากๆ (view spoiler)[ยูสตาซและจิลเดินทางกลับมายังนาร์เนีย ในขณะที่ยูสตาซตกหน้าผาแต่ได้รับความช่วยเหลือจากอัซลาน จิลก็ได้มอบหมายภารกิจให้ตามหาเจ้าชายริเลียนที่หายสาบสูญไปและให้จิลท่องจำสัญญาณทั้ง 4 ประการ ยูสตาซและจิลได้มาพบกับพัดเดิลกลัม ทั้งสามได้ร่วมเดินทางผ่านหุบเขาและไปยังเมืองของยักษ์ แต่เมื่อจิลจำสัญญาณทั้ง 3 ที่เธอหลงลืมไปได้ เธอก็พบว่าเธอต้องย้อนกลับไปยังเมืองที่ถูกทำลายจนย่อยยับที่พวกเธอผ่านมาก่อนหน้านี้ ประจวบเหมาะกับที่เด็กๆรู้ว่ายักษ์ตั้งใจจะจับพวกเขากิน ดังนั้นจิล ยูสตาสและพัดเดิลกลัมจึงหนีออกมาเมืองยักษ์และเดินทางสู่เมืองที่ซ่อนอยู่ใต้พิภพ ที่นั่นเด็กๆและพัดเดิลกลัมได้พบกับอัศวินที่ตกอยู่ภายใต้คำสาปและถูกมัดติดอยู่กับเก้าอี้เงินยามที่เขาคลุ้มคลั่ง แต่จิลและยูสตาสกลับพบว่าตัวตนที่แท้จริงของอัศวินกลับเปิดเผยออกมาในเวลานั้น พวกเขาจึงตัดสินใจปล่อยอัศวินเป็นอิสระและจึงรู้ในที่สุดว่าอัศวินคนนี้คือเจ้าชายริเลียนที่สาบสูญไปนั่นเอง เมื่อแม่มดกลับมาและรู้ว่าเจ้าชายเป็นอิสระ เธอจึงกลายร่างเป็นอสรพิษยักษ์ เจ้าชายและเด็กๆสามารถฆ่าแม่มดลงได้ ดังนั้นพวกเขาต้องหาทางหลบหนีมาจากเมืองใต้พิภพที่กำลังจะล่มสลาย หลังจากการเดินทางที่อันยาวนาน จิล ยูสตาซ พัดเดิลกลัมและเจ้าชายริเลียนก็ได้เดินทางกลับมายังนาร์เนียผ่านอุโมงค์ใต้ดินในที่สุด และเจ้าชายริเลียนก็มาทันลมหายใจสุดท้ายของเจ้าชายแคสเปียนที่สิ้นพระชนม์ลงพอดิบพอดี (hide spoiler)]

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dannii Elle

    This is my sixth journey into the fantastical lands of Narnia, as I have chosen to read the series in chronological rather than publication order. Eustace Stubb and Jill Pole manage to escape the bullies of their own world and enter into the fantastical lands of Narnia. Borne on a lion's breath they descend and discover that the lands are once again in turmoil. Young Prince Rilian is missing and old King Caspian is on his death bed, with no heir to precede him. It is up to the duo, along with the This is my sixth journey into the fantastical lands of Narnia, as I have chosen to read the series in chronological rather than publication order. Eustace Stubb and Jill Pole manage to escape the bullies of their own world and enter into the fantastical lands of Narnia. Borne on a lion's breath they descend and discover that the lands are once again in turmoil. Young Prince Rilian is missing and old King Caspian is on his death bed, with no heir to precede him. It is up to the duo, along with the help of Puddleglum the Marsh-wiggle, to traverse the strange country, find the missing heir and save Narnia for the doom that could otherwise befall it. Like the other instalments in this series, there was a moralistic and overtly religious edge to the text that jarred with me, as a contemporary reader. That being said, it did not hamper my overall enjoyment of this fantastical and magical tale. The characters were as lovable as always and the journey as transporting and enchanting. Puddleglum's character made for especially charming reading, as his pessimistic disposition managed to instil the opposite emotion in the reader and made this humorous and delightful. There is a simplicity and goodness to these stories, where good can be relied upon to overcome evil and justice is always served. With only one more tale left in the series, I will be sad to say goodbye to this world.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jay Kennedy

    Absolutely brilliant, one of my favourite Chronicle of Narnia books.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    GoodReads/Amazon management is censoring reviews from the sight of their "community". Criticism of the acquisition of GoodReads by Amazon results in the summary disappearance of the review from the book listing, without informing the reviewer. This review has therefore been replaced. Copies of the complete version of this review have therefore been posted to the following sites: http://bobquasit.dreamwidth.org/74633... https://plus.google.com/1010891083815... http://pmaranci.booklikes.com/post/47.. GoodReads/Amazon management is censoring reviews from the sight of their "community". Criticism of the acquisition of GoodReads by Amazon results in the summary disappearance of the review from the book listing, without informing the reviewer. This review has therefore been replaced. Copies of the complete version of this review have therefore been posted to the following sites: http://bobquasit.dreamwidth.org/74633... https://plus.google.com/1010891083815... http://pmaranci.booklikes.com/post/47... http://www.librarything.com/work/1182... If you, like me, object to what Amazon has done to the world of books, book lovers, and book shops, you can find many alternatives to GoodReads (for reviews) and to Amazon (for shopping) at the "Escaping Amazon" community [https://plus.google.com/communities/1...]. Our free public resource listing and describing alternatives is at [https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/c... . There are better sites, both for reading and for shopping. Please be aware that the reviews you read here on GoodReads (now wholly owned by Amazon) are not an unbiased representation of the opinions of site members. Reviews which threaten Amazon's bottom line are censored. Reviewers aren't even informed that their sites have been quietly exiled to a literary ghetto. We, as readers, deserve better than GoodReads/Amazon. Readers and their love of books are not commodities to be bought and sold - unless we allow it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    The last two books are definitely not in line for my favourites. There are various factors -- one of which is simply that I don't like seeing Narnia come to an end! But the main one is that I don't find Jill, Eustace and Puddleglum that compelling as main characters. Or Rillian, for that matter, even though he's Caspian's son. They're quite realistic and human, and lack the nobility that Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy have, I think. Perhaps too realistic. I want to kick Jill a lot of the time for The last two books are definitely not in line for my favourites. There are various factors -- one of which is simply that I don't like seeing Narnia come to an end! But the main one is that I don't find Jill, Eustace and Puddleglum that compelling as main characters. Or Rillian, for that matter, even though he's Caspian's son. They're quite realistic and human, and lack the nobility that Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy have, I think. Perhaps too realistic. I want to kick Jill a lot of the time for making excuses and not doing what she knows is right. Nobody else is much better. Puddleglum is an interesting idea for a character, but I don't find him that compelling. It doesn't help that this book is fairly dreary. Snow, stone, cold, giants, underground, sunless seas... there are some beautiful, beautiful sections, like the description of Bism, and little gems about Narnia, like about how serious it is to ask a centaur to stay for the weekend. Overall, though, I find it hard to get into and sympathise with the characters. I do find myself tearing up, even now, at Caspian's death and renewal.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    I felt that The Silver Chair gave better character arcs to the "son and daughter of Adam and Eve" than some of the other Narnia books. The focus of the book seemed to be shared between the children, Eustace and Jill, as well as the quest - instead of focusing on the quest alone. Also, the Marsh-wiggle is a well drawn character and pretty unique from Lewis' other personalities in Narnia. Like the other books in the series, this one continues to touch the surface of the adventures and explanations I felt that The Silver Chair gave better character arcs to the "son and daughter of Adam and Eve" than some of the other Narnia books. The focus of the book seemed to be shared between the children, Eustace and Jill, as well as the quest - instead of focusing on the quest alone. Also, the Marsh-wiggle is a well drawn character and pretty unique from Lewis' other personalities in Narnia. Like the other books in the series, this one continues to touch the surface of the adventures and explanations, but I felt it was more complete than some of the other books in the series. Perhaps I'm just getting more used to Lewis' writing style. As always though we are taken to wonderful new places and meet interesting new characters, and visits from old friends are always met with a warm heart. Certain parts were somewhat sad, but most of it was happily addressed at the end. Aslan is always very magnificent! And I found myself very much enjoying the adventures and the characters throughout the book! *** Embarking to Narnia again;)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Anne Hamilton

    Once upon a time, about forty years ago, I read the entire series of The Chronicles of Narnia in a single week. Way back then, I would probably given The Silver Chair two stars. But only because I was feeling generous and I was still in the halo of The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. Some time in the interim, The Silver Chair moved from the bottom of my ratings to the top. And I do mean the very top. Today I'd give it more than five stars, if I could. Its rise has been steady; modest at first, it eve Once upon a time, about forty years ago, I read the entire series of The Chronicles of Narnia in a single week. Way back then, I would probably given The Silver Chair two stars. But only because I was feeling generous and I was still in the halo of The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. Some time in the interim, The Silver Chair moved from the bottom of my ratings to the top. And I do mean the very top. Today I'd give it more than five stars, if I could. Its rise has been steady; modest at first, it eventually came to float in and out of my Top 10 for a while. Now it's a serious contender for the all–time Number 1 spot. What happened to change my views? Well, first of all, I attended a L'Abri conference featuring Jerram Barrs and Wim Rietkirk at the University of Queensland sometime in the early eighties. One of them—I think it was Rietkirk—quoted at length from the scene where Rilian, Puddleglum and the children face off the Green Witch as she strums her enchantment of befuddlement in the Underworld. I can't remember exactly what they said but it changed my appreciation of the whole book. It stopped being one of my least favourite books and began its slow ascendancy. Then came the BBC series with Tom Baker (the fourth Doctor in the Doctor Who television series) as Puddleglum the marshwiggle. Such a respectabiggle portrayal! I liked the series so much, the book again made a jump in my estimation. (I even liked the bit they added with Eustace and the dragon—such a perfect touch!) Then I started to write books of my own. I loved two of the Narnia books, hated two and felt the other three were middling. It was an enormous surprise to me when, as I started to write, I found myself wanting to fill in the 'missing' story set on Ettinsmoor! Until I'd was half way into chapter 1 of Merlin's Wood, I had no idea I thought Narnia was incomplete, let alone that its incompleteness was connected with a story centred on Ettinsmoor. Fortunately good sense prevailed and my story shifted location to another planet entirely! However faint echoes of my flirtation with Ettinsmoor can be still be found throughout the story. As a result of this experience, I realised something deep in my spirit connected with something deep in this story, despite my superficial equivocation about liking it. The huge leap forward came as a result of two books: Planet Narnia and Green Suns and Faërie. I love Planet Narnia. I think it’s brilliant, incisive, a stunning work of sheer genius. I also think it’s wrong. In a very subtle way. As much as the difference between the north pole and the north magnetic pole. I was succumbing to the charms of its central premise—that the seven books of the Narnia series are based around the seven medieval planets—when I was brought up short by an obvious error. The Silver Chair is not, in my view, themed around the Moon. It’s themed around giants. In fact 40% of the chapters directly deal with giants or giants’ work. It’s all too easy here to be swayed by the word silver and its ubiquitous association with the moon. However, I believe the silverness of the chair is another of Lewis’ (many) tips of the hat to his friend and colleague, JRR Tolkien. In Green Suns and Faërie, Verlyn Flieger writes of Tolkien’s reworking of a Breton folktale on a variant theme of the Orpheus legend. The Corrigan is a faery woman who sits on a silver chair, rules an underworld and seeks to lure a hero to her dark realm. Sound familiar? The story doesn’t end well for the hero, so Lewis’ variant on a variant is more in line with the happily–ever–after of the medieval poem, Sir Orfeo . (Yep, another Tolkien obsession.) However the general alignment of plot at least as it pertains to the Rilian character suggests to me that silver is more to do with Tolkien's description of the Corrigan's chair than any lunar aspect. The Corrigan of course is a fairly obscure denizen of the lands of elfin. No doubt her name reminded Lewis of the Morrighan the war goddess of Ulster, the land of his birth. The Morrighan is said to be the forerunner of the witch queen Morgan le Fay in Arthurian romance. In fact Lewis was seriously tempted to name the White Witch 'Morgan' and not 'Jadis', as early drafts of The Magician's Nephew indicate. The inspiration of the Corrigan as a distant relative of the Morrighan is, I think, alluded to in the distant relationship between the witches of the north to Jadis. Jadis has, like Aslan, echoes of Norse naming. (Yeah, I know. Turkish cigarettes called Aslans with pictures of lions on them. Tales of the Arabian Nights with lions, aslans, in them. Yeah, yeah. Gimme a break. For a man self–admittedly ‘crazed with northern–ness’? When Aslan from Old Norse is god of the land?!) There are several possible translations for Jadis from Old Norse, but I’m inclined to go with ironwood witch–mother. Which probably explains the appearance of Fenris Ulf instead of Maugrim in the American editions: because he too comes from the ironwood. I just don’t get the bizarre tendency of those who write about Lewis to overlook the Old Icelandic language. There are too many allusions to Norse mythology to look south for the answers in my view and see Latin or Turkish in the snow–swirled landscape of Narnia. So, heading north, I will point out that the giants dominate the tale of The Silver Chair, far more than silvery things or watery things or lunar things. And in Norse mythology, the giants are the thurses, the rises and the jotuns; they’re the ettins or eotens from which Tolkien derived the name, ents. Even in Irish folklore, the Red Ettin is a giant of the Jack–and–the–Beanstalk school. Here’s where the name Ettinsmoor comes into its own: it’s the high moorland of the giants. Fits nicely. It’s probably based on the Borders area of Scotland, since the folktale of the giant of the broch of Edinshall (edin being a variant of ettin) is about a rock–throwing game. Now in Norse mythology, gnomes and giants are sometimes confused. Thus, if it’s permissible to add in the chapters about the gnomes to the count of the giants, over 50% of the book are devoted to the big guys. Now the giant planet is not the Moon. It’s Jupiter. Which, in medieval times, was equated to Thor. (Both wield thunderbolts, for the obvious parallel.) We refer to Thor all the time, even though few of us realise it. Thursday is named after this feisty hammer–wielding giant. And herein lies, I think, Lewis’ clever gamesmanship and mastery of words. The Silver Chair is themed around Thursday, not around the Moon. Moreover it’s not a nod to Thor/Jupiter but rather to the thurses of Norse mythology. (Not forgetting thur from old Gaelic is strong.) As it happens, the medieval planets correspond to the Days of the Week. So I believe Michael Ward in Planet Narnia was utterly, superlatively, outstandingly right in his overall theory while still being wrong in important specific details. (Because it’s a closed system, one error means there have to be at least two. Another involves The Voyage of the Dawn Treader which should be aligned with Wednesday and Woden/Mercury—as clearly attested by the silver sea or lily lake sailed by Reepicheep and which appears in the myth about Mercury.) Now all this cleverness was admirable and wonderful. But it certainly wasn’t enough to catapult The Silver Chair so far up it has come to rival my all–time favourite story. What did it was a study of threshold covenants. As I’ve worked on understanding them and listing the symptoms of them, I realised The Silver Chair is the story par excellence of their nature. Python — check! Wasteland — check! Memory issues — check! Giants out to make a meal of us — check! Giants on a threshold — check! Being silenced by the enemy — check! Ambiguous information — check! ‘If’ — check! Theft of destiny — check! Name covenant — check! The Silver Chair could almost be a manual on the tricks and tactics of the Python spirit governing thresholds. Indeed the Lady who lures Prince Rilian from the fountain assumes the form of a monstrous snake at the climax of the story and tries to crush him to death. The heroes find their way underground to rescue Prince Rilian through a giant letter E, suggesting that the Lady was meant to evoke an image of the ‘Pythoness’ of Delphi, an oracular shrine famed for its navelstone carved with a mysterious E. (Which most probably, according to Plutarch, means if.) It’s been enormously helpful to me as I’ve looked more at threshold covenants. The really interesting aspect of the novel is that it starts with a name covenant. As it should if it’s truly dealing with thresholds. In fact, it begins an evocation of a very particular name covenant. The massive fall of Jill into Narnia at the beginning of the story which ends with a watery splash should remind us of the nursery rhyme, Jack and Jill, and of Lewis’ own nickname: Jack. So, of course, it has giants. Because what else does Jack face in the most enduring fairytale of all about a boy of that name? A giant, of course, at the top of a beanstalk. Lewis had always been fascinated by the foes of his namesake. He wrote passionately of Gawain from Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and the ettins that were blowing after him. The Green Knight of the tale is half–ettin himself, his unnamed wife has a green girdle and appears to be a student of Morgan le Fay. So it is no surprise to find gusts of the great medieval poem, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight , all the way through The Silver Chair. It isn’t far from the Lady of the Green Girdle to the Lady of the Green Kirtle, after all, especially when both of whom are artists of ambiguity and deceit. And if anything is going to make me love a book more, it’s one that owes its inspiration to Sir Gawain and the Green Knight , an especial and particular favourite of mine.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Carmen de la Rosa

    Lo siento pero este libro es el peor de la saga. Nada de lo que sucedió en este libro me gusto, me aburrió muchísimo, los personajes se me hicieron tan grises, lo que sucedió en la trama me hacia pensar que no sucedió en Narnia, no había magia, no había esa sensación de ilusión, no lo disfrute en absoluto, hubo partes demasiado pesadas, fue el libro que más pesado y lento se me hizo. Eustace regresa con una amiga de la escuela, Jill. Para encontrar al Príncipe desaparecido, cuya desaparición ha p Lo siento pero este libro es el peor de la saga. Nada de lo que sucedió en este libro me gusto, me aburrió muchísimo, los personajes se me hicieron tan grises, lo que sucedió en la trama me hacia pensar que no sucedió en Narnia, no había magia, no había esa sensación de ilusión, no lo disfrute en absoluto, hubo partes demasiado pesadas, fue el libro que más pesado y lento se me hizo. Eustace regresa con una amiga de la escuela, Jill. Para encontrar al Príncipe desaparecido, cuya desaparición ha provocado la desaparición de otros miembros numerosos en su búsqueda. Su viaje los lleva a la tierra de los gigantes y al mundo subterráneo. Otro punto negativo es la superioridad masculina que esta siempre presente en la serie... Algo que puedo aceptar hasta cierto nivel, pero en este libro parece que Lewis se desvive por degradar a las mujeres. Este es el primer libro (cronológicamente) que no presenta a Lucy, el personaje femenino era fuerte y valiente. En cambio, en este tenemos a Jill. Y seamos sinceros, Jill es una cobarde. Eso fue algo con lo que no pude en todo el libro. Para ser el penúltimo libro no estuvo al nivel que se necesitaba, ya que me daba igual lo que sucedía con los personajes, espero que el siguiente que es el ultimo este mucho mejor, simplemente por ser el final de la saga.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Katie Ziegler (Life Between Words)

    I. Love. Puddleglum.

  17. 5 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    The Journey to the Depths 22 June 2017 Well, here we have another C.S. Lewis book which suggests that this post might actually be quite long. The reason for this is that C.S. Lewis is one of the most considered writers that I know and when he wrote, and published, a book he never did it by halves. As such we have, like the rest of the Chronicles of Narnia, a book that while it has been written for children, and generally aimed at children (which is impressive for somebody who never had children o The Journey to the Depths 22 June 2017 Well, here we have another C.S. Lewis book which suggests that this post might actually be quite long. The reason for this is that C.S. Lewis is one of the most considered writers that I know and when he wrote, and published, a book he never did it by halves. As such we have, like the rest of the Chronicles of Narnia, a book that while it has been written for children, and generally aimed at children (which is impressive for somebody who never had children of his own, though he did have a step son), yet is so deep with meaning and allegory that once I got to the end my mind was literally spinning. There are a couple of reasons why it has taken me so long to get around to reading this book, one of them being that until recently all of my Narnia books where sitting some 700 kilometers away from where I currently am. The other reason was because, foolishly somewhat, I wanted to read it after I saw the movie, but since it has now been seven years since the last movie (Voyage of the Dawntredder) it seems to be less and less likely that this was going to happen. Sure, there seems to always been rumours that the next movie is coming soon, but in the end my urge to actually read this book simply outweighed my desire to wait for the movie. Anyway, more likely than not the movie is going to be such a butchering of the original work that waiting would be pointless. The Classical World C.S. Lewis was very familiar with the writings, and the stories, of the Ancient Greeks, and in a way these ideas seem to filter into the Narnia Chronicles. Okay, sure, he was a Christian, and it is very hard to ignore the Christian themes that appear in his books (which is one of the reasons people were put off by the films – they ceased to focus on the message that Lewis wanted us to hear and simply became another Hollywood fantasy movie), but Lewis (or should I call him Jack, since that is what his friends referred to him as, though his students probably called him Professor Lewis) beautifully wove concepts from the myths of the Greeks into what is in effect a Christian message. The main reason that I was drawn into this book was the idea of the katabasis, or the journey beneath. The idea of the katabasis appears regularly in Greek literature and usually involves the hero traveling into the underworld to either garner information by communing with the dead, or in some cases, such as Orpheus, to bring somebody back to life (and while the story of Orpheus drips with a lot of Christian allegories, this is not the place to explore it). In a way the concept of the katabasis can be a reflection on our own lives, those times of darkness where there seems to be no escape, but results is us coming to understand our own self much better. The other aspect of the katabasis is how they travel into the underworld to rescue somebody. In one way this seems to be an analogy of evangelism – rescuing somebody from their life of destruction and bring them back into a life of beauty. However, this idea isn’t necessarily just Christian because there are even stories of how people go to great lengths, and plow into such areas of darkness, to save somebody (think of the movies of the Vietnam Vets returning to Vietnam to rescue their brothers in arms). The Journey The Silver Chair has only one character, Scrubb, coming from the previous books, and introduces a new character, Jill Pole. This is intentional because in these books the children who go on the journey to Narnia do so because there is something that they need to learn. In the previous books we are told that there are certain characters that will not be making the journey again, and this is because Narnia has already taught them everything they need to know. However, with Scrubb, we know that when he first arrived in Narnia is was a right ratbag, and while his previous experience did change him, there was more work to be done. So, they arrive in Narnia and have been told that the crown prince have gone missing, and it is their job to go and find them. As such they go on a journey to the frozen north, join a parliament of owls, befreind a Marshwiggle, escape from becoming dinner for Giants, and travel into the underworld in search of the Prince. Not surprisingly they succeed, free the prince from bondage to somebody who could well be the White Witch from the first book (though her identity is never explicitly spelt out), and then return as heroes. Being Good One of the themes in this book is our inability to be able to live a good life. Sure, many of us claim to be good, but the thing is that we, as humans, are always cutting corners, or even forgetting things. Sure, we may not explicitly do bad things, but as the saying goes – for bad men to succeed good men need do nothing. It is not always what we do but in many cases what we don’t do. Once again this may not be explicit, and it may not be something that we intentionally do, but the thing is as the other saying goes – the path to hell is paved with good intentions. In the story, Jill is given four explicit commands by Aslan, and she is told not to forget them. However, you can probably guess what happens – she forgets them, and throughout the book we are left hanging, wandering whether Jill and Edmund’s failure to follow Aslan’s commands will lead to a failure in the mission. In a way it is much like the way we live our lives, stumbling around blind, in part knowing what we should do, and how we should behave, yet never actually meeting the mark. The good news is that no matter how much the children failed to follow Aslan’s commands, there was still always hope, in the way that in our lives there is still always hope no matter how much we fail. This is one of the biggest issues that I see with modern Christianity – there does not seem to be any room for failure. Churches don’t seem to be places for broken and desperate people to find comfort. In fact churches come across as places for good people, places for people who don’t question but accept, but mostly places for people who fit a certain mould and unless to fit that mould then you have no reason to be there. Faith The thing with Aslan’s commands is that sometimes they don’t make sense. In fact the command may actually fly in the face of reality. In the story the children encounter a knight in the underworld, and the knight seems to be the last person whom they are looking for. They were told by Aslan that the person who calls out his name is a person whom they can trust. However, the knight, for a period every night, must be bound to a chair because he is struck with madness. They are told that they are forbidden to watch, however they managed to sneak into the room while the knight sinks into madness. However, it is during this time that the knight screams out to Aslan and suddenly the children are left with a dilemma – they are told that the person who calls out Aslan’s name is a person whom they can trust, yet the only person who does that is a man in the throws of madness. This is the thing about faith, trusting something even though all of the evidence flies in the face of it. Mind you, I am not attempting to justify anti-vaxers, or creation scientists here, because I don’t think this is what Lewis is on about. However we think of things that Jesus tells us, such as loving our enemies and turning the other cheek. In these cases evidence suggests that we should respond in kind, to defend ourselves, and that the best form of defense is a good offense. However, as Lewis suggests in other works, to respond to evil with evil only adds to the amount of evil in the world, but to respond to evil with good not only works to blunt the evil in the world, but has the way of actually making it a better place to live. The Illusion This is another thing that Lewis seems to have borrowed from the Ancient Greeks, in particular Plato, but it also has a lot of biblical implications as well. When they are trapped in the underworld, the witch finds them and begins to play an instrument and sings as to how the upper world, and Narnia, are nothing more than illusions. This is something that we face every day in the materialistic world in which we live. The thing is that scientific materialism tells just that the only thing that is real is what we we had see, smell, and touch, or even measure with scientific instruments. Our world claims that the only reality is the reality that we can perceive. However, Lewis claims otherwise, because there is a greater, spiritual, reality beyond what we can see. He explains this through the reality of the underworld. The thing is that they are trapped down here, and the longer that they are trapped, the more distant the memories of another world disappear. In a sense this is the nature of slavery – it works by convincing the slave that there is nothing beyond the world in which they live. However, this isn’t just an idea of literal slavery, but can also be the case with economic slavery. The thing with our modern world is that it seeks to enslave us to a system of work, and gets us into debt so that we become enslaved to our work. We are constantly told that having a full time job means that we are secure, and that to leave it is just too risky. Moreso, the higher up the chain we go, the more enslaved we become. In the end that freedom, hope, and energy that we had as youths is slowly drained away by the perceived reality of the situation that we are now in.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Neda

    هنوز هم معتقد نیستم که نویسنده عنوان خوبی برای این جلدش انتخاب کرده باشه.. شاید تنها یک کمی از یک فصل به این صندلی نقره ای می پردازه که در واقع شاهزاده لیرین رو طلسم کرده و وقتی شاهزاده با کمک یوستس و جیل و باتلاقی موفق میشن که شاهزاده رو از طلسم آزاد کنن، شاهزاده اون صندلی نقره ای رو با شمشیرش تکه تکه میکنه. همین.. شاید اگه نام خود شاهزاده گمشده عنوان میشد بهتر می بود. به هر حال به نظرم جلدهای قبلی نارنیا بهتر بودن اگر چه از ماجراجویی هم این جلد کم نداشت. اینا همه به کنار چند تا جمله آخرهای رما هنوز هم معتقد نیستم که نویسنده عنوان خوبی برای این جلدش انتخاب کرده باشه.. شاید تنها یک کمی از یک فصل به این صندلی نقره ای می پردازه که در واقع شاهزاده لیرین رو طلسم کرده و وقتی شاهزاده با کمک یوستس و جیل و باتلاقی موفق میشن که شاهزاده رو از طلسم آزاد کنن، شاهزاده اون صندلی نقره ای رو با شمشیرش تکه تکه میکنه. همین.. شاید اگه نام خود شاهزاده گمشده عنوان میشد بهتر می بود. به هر حال به نظرم جلدهای قبلی نارنیا بهتر بودن اگر چه از ماجراجویی هم این جلد کم نداشت. اینا همه به کنار چند تا جمله آخرهای رمان بود که خیلی جالب بود و کلی خندیدم.. جالبه که یه جورهای رگه های سیاسی هم داره.. اما خیلی بامزه بود.. اینجوریه که اسلان بچه ها رو برمیگردونه به این دنیا و شاه کاسپین هم باهاشون میاد. اسلان بچه ها رو مسلح کرده که با اون قلدرهای مدرسه بجنگند و خودش هم پشت یه ماجرا کرده و هوای بچه ها رو داره و دیواری هم که اومدن به این دنیا ویران شده. از قضا (همون جور که آقوی همساده میگه :)) ) خانم مدیر مدرسه میاد و اون صحنه رو می بینه و زنگ میزنه به پلیس. اما قبل از اینکه پلیس بیاد، اسلان همه چیز رو درست کرده و دیوار هم سالم و بچه ها هم رفتن و اینا.. حالا ببینید لوئیس در توصیف این ماجرا چی نوشته: »وقتی پلیس رسید، نه شیری دید، نه دیوار ریخته ای و نه مجرم فراری ای، فقط خانم مدیر مدرسه بود که مثل دیوانه ها شده بود و همین مسئله موجب شد که کل مدرسه و مسائل آن، موضوع بازرسی قرارگیرد. در طول بازرسی، تمام مسائل و مشکلات مربوط به سرای تجربه (نام مدرسه بچه هاست) معلوم شد و در نتیجه، ده نفر اخراج شدند. بعد از آن هم دوستان خانم مدیر متوجه شدند که او دیگر به درد مدیریت مدرسه نمی خورد. به همین دلیل، او را به عنوان بازرس منصوب کردند تا در کار مدیران دیگر فضولی کند. وقتی هم متوجه شدند که حتی به درد فضولی هم نمیخورد، او را به عنوان نماینده مجلس انتخاب کردند و او در آنجا به خوبی و خوشی تا آخر عمر زندگی کرد. » :-دی جالب بود نه؟ ;)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jesica

    Another one year in London and about 50 years in Narnia. Eustace Scrubb was comforting his friend, Jill Pole when the kid that bullied Jill came. They ran to hide and stumbled into another world where Eustace fell to a cliff but saved by Aslan. The two of them were then sent to Narnia to find the missing Prince Rillian, son of Caspian X and the heir of Narnia throne. Eustace and Jill is my favorite pair in Narnia series. I especially love their adventures in this book because their innocence. Whi Another one year in London and about 50 years in Narnia. Eustace Scrubb was comforting his friend, Jill Pole when the kid that bullied Jill came. They ran to hide and stumbled into another world where Eustace fell to a cliff but saved by Aslan. The two of them were then sent to Narnia to find the missing Prince Rillian, son of Caspian X and the heir of Narnia throne. Eustace and Jill is my favorite pair in Narnia series. I especially love their adventures in this book because their innocence. While the Pevensies had been the kings and queens, it could be said that Eustace and Jill were nobodies so they somehow more carefree and without much responsibilities and expectations. Jill had never been to Narnia and Eustace had only gone once and in a short time so he hardly more experienced. They kept making mistakes and missing Aslan’s signs that they made their journey far more difficult than necessary but that’s what makes it interesting. And their guide, Puddleglum the Marsh-wiggle was just weirdly cute. There’s another evil witch here though I don’t think any witch could beat Jadis. There’s hints on the world’s end and the next and final book in the series (chronologically) so it makes finishing this series more exciting.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah Rodda

    A pleasure to read this to my kids. Arguably my favourite Narnia book! And isn't this every bullied child's dream - to escape the bullies and be whisked away to a magical land?

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Terrington

    The Chronicles of Narnia are my favourite book series and The Silver Chair stands as my favourite book within that series. There are several clear reasons for this in a story about redemption, belief and magical adventure and I shall attempt to explain them to you. I particularly love the plot and characters of The Silver Chair. The idea of a quest to find a missing prince is rather old hat, but the twist Lewis offers on that quest with Aslan providing new character Jill Pole several signs to rec The Chronicles of Narnia are my favourite book series and The Silver Chair stands as my favourite book within that series. There are several clear reasons for this in a story about redemption, belief and magical adventure and I shall attempt to explain them to you. I particularly love the plot and characters of The Silver Chair. The idea of a quest to find a missing prince is rather old hat, but the twist Lewis offers on that quest with Aslan providing new character Jill Pole several signs to recognise and remember in the search for this missing prince, is fascinating. Not only is this a perfect metaphor for the concept of belief and faith, but it also serves to provide an interesting dilemma in situations such as when Eustace and Jill decide to go into Castle Harfang due to the cold - rather than follow what the signs truly tell them to do. My favourite character in this novel is Puddleglum the Marsh Wiggle. He is the realistic, yet pessimistically cynical character who always finds something to grumble about. It is the earthy nature to this character that causes him to be so likeable as more than merely a reluctant hero, but as an unlikely hero. Yet in the end he is a true hero in how he sacrifices and does what is right, regardless of the cost. What else can I say about this novel without gushing all about it? I could say little to sway your opinion, other than to express repeatedly that I hold this novel in very high esteem and therefore encourage others to give it a chance (along with this series). There is plenty more depth in these books than many recognise and certainly far more than merely Christian themes and messages. There are universal messages and beauties to appeal to all.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Abhishek

    Narnia is a magical place... a land you wish you would get to visit at least once in your lifetime! And meet the great Aslan as well... And this book starts with the same idea, wherein Eustace wants to visit this world in the other realm again after his adventures in the previous tale makes him hungry for more. I found The Silver Chair to be one of my favourite stories in these masterpieces of C.S. Lewis. This tale gave me an adventurous feeling none other than the ones I felt while reading The Narnia is a magical place... a land you wish you would get to visit at least once in your lifetime! And meet the great Aslan as well... And this book starts with the same idea, wherein Eustace wants to visit this world in the other realm again after his adventures in the previous tale makes him hungry for more. I found The Silver Chair to be one of my favourite stories in these masterpieces of C.S. Lewis. This tale gave me an adventurous feeling none other than the ones I felt while reading The Lord of the Rings series. We go along with Eustace and his friend, Jill Pole, on a mission set by Aslan himself to search for the missing Prince Rilian and the son of Lord Caspian. The journey takes the readers through high mountainous terrains and snow clad regions, encountering enormous sized owls, Marsh-wiggles, giants and of course a witch along the way. Similar to the themes of most of the books, the tale talks about courage and perseverance amidst all kinds of calamities and faith above all in Aslan and his everfelt presence. To those who love adventure, to those who love tales of C. Lewis, to those who believe that such imaginative stories hold value and teach us lessons in our real world too, to them The Silver Chair is a must read story. To Aslan, to Narnia!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Denisse

    Maybe Narnia is not for me. I mean, I loved the first one but, it had a sparkle I haven't found in the others so far. This one was even slow pace wich is stupid cause the letter is huge and the number of pages a piece of cake for a normal reader. It is adventurous as all the other books I've read so far but the new characters lack something the originals had. Anyway, it helps when you just read something very long and challenging. Sigo leyendo las continuaciones porque quiero saber como acaba la Maybe Narnia is not for me. I mean, I loved the first one but, it had a sparkle I haven't found in the others so far. This one was even slow pace wich is stupid cause the letter is huge and the number of pages a piece of cake for a normal reader. It is adventurous as all the other books I've read so far but the new characters lack something the originals had. Anyway, it helps when you just read something very long and challenging. Sigo leyendo las continuaciones porque quiero saber como acaba la serie pero la verdad no la estoy disfrutando mucho. No encuentro ya nada poético en lo que ocurre durante los libros, y las aventuras por las que pasan los personajes ya no son de mi interés. Aun asi, seguiré leyendo.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    Despite what the title implies, a silver chair is not the star of The Silver Chair. The seat in question isn't a grand MacGuffin or a legendary artifact; it's just a prop of moderate prominence present in a single scene. If it weren't for the book's heading, I doubt most readers would remember the chair, much less what color it was. And this got me wondering; what would it be like if the rest of The Chronicles of Naria were named in a similar fashion? (i.e. for an somewhat important but potentia Despite what the title implies, a silver chair is not the star of The Silver Chair. The seat in question isn't a grand MacGuffin or a legendary artifact; it's just a prop of moderate prominence present in a single scene. If it weren't for the book's heading, I doubt most readers would remember the chair, much less what color it was. And this got me wondering; what would it be like if the rest of The Chronicles of Naria were named in a similar fashion? (i.e. for an somewhat important but potentially forgettable object from the narrative.) Maybe something like this: Book 1: The Bell Book 2: The Wardrobe Book 3: City of Filth Book 4: Prince Caspian Book 5: King Caspian Book 6: The Silver Chair Book 7: Lion-skin Sweater The story itself is a muddled heap of religious themes and amusing adventures. The villain is an evil witch who seams to be a mixed metaphor from the book of Genesis; combining elements of Eve and serpent. This witch wants to conquer Narnia for some reason, but she gets less page-time than the other villains in The Chronicles so it's hard to peg her as anything more than a symbol. Our heroine, Jill Pole, is tasked with finding a lost prince who's been enchanted by the witch. Her primary responsibility on this quest is to remember a series of clues, given to her by Aslan himself. She's to recite these clues and know them by heart the way a Catholic might be instructed to memorize prayers. Yet Jill and her companions muff the first three clues and the final clue (regarding the prince's identity) turns out to be a disappointing mystery because the Prince is literally the only man they meet on their journey. But maybe there's a reason Lewis' allegory has a bit of a parody feel this time around, for of all the chronicles The Silver Chair features the most humor. There's a elderly dwarf who mishears everything he's told, a council of silly owls, a kingdom of giants who know just How to Serve Humans and a morose but wise marsh-wiggle (a long-limbed frog-man) named Puddleglum, who fans of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy might recognize as a literary great-uncle of Marvin the robot. So pull up a chair (silver or otherwise) and enjoy a few laughs with the denizens of Narnia. Bible study can wait.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Els

    Loved it. As always. Wish I was small and simplistic again, though, so that I wouldn't constantly mentally add to Lewis' writing to make it more descriptive and/or profound. This is a children's book, Seneca. Relax. You got the point when you were younger. And sometimes, simplicity is best.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ivonne Rovira

    C.S. Lewis’ The Silver Chair isn’t nearly as successful as The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe and Prince Caspian; even so, that leaves plenty of possibility for this book, which relates the return of the reformed prig Eustace Stubbs to Narnia, this time with a new companion, Jill Pole. The pair, with the help of the great lion Aslan, set out on a quest to find the missing Price Rilian, son of that very same Caspian. The novel starts a bit slowly, but both the storyline and the underlying Chris C.S. Lewis’ The Silver Chair isn’t nearly as successful as The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe and Prince Caspian; even so, that leaves plenty of possibility for this book, which relates the return of the reformed prig Eustace Stubbs to Narnia, this time with a new companion, Jill Pole. The pair, with the help of the great lion Aslan, set out on a quest to find the missing Price Rilian, son of that very same Caspian. The novel starts a bit slowly, but both the storyline and the underlying Christian allegory prove pleasant enough. If you don’t expect The Silver Chair to be as good as those featuring the Pevensie children, you won’t be disappointed. After all, the book was good enough for me to order The Horse and His Boy immediately.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Evan Leach

    My memories of The Silver Chair from childhood are mixed. As a youngster, I read the series in chronological order (the same way I'm re-reading them as an adult), and so this was my penultimate journey through Narnia. The fact that I was on the second to last book, combined with the fact that by this entry, all of the Pevensie children had outgrown Narnia, left me with an uneasy sense of the passage of time and an awareness that all things must end. The effect was bittersweet, and I still rememb My memories of The Silver Chair from childhood are mixed. As a youngster, I read the series in chronological order (the same way I'm re-reading them as an adult), and so this was my penultimate journey through Narnia. The fact that I was on the second to last book, combined with the fact that by this entry, all of the Pevensie children had outgrown Narnia, left me with an uneasy sense of the passage of time and an awareness that all things must end. The effect was bittersweet, and I still remember the impression it left on me 20+ years later. The story itself is somewhere in the middle of the Narnian pack with regards to quality. There are some great elements (Puddleglum, the city of giants, and the underground world in particular), but at least for me, the story was missing that extra something that elevates the very best of the Narnia tales. Still, this is a very good adventure story overall that can be enjoyed by children of all ages. 4.0 stars, recommended!

  28. 5 out of 5

    midnightfaerie

    The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by CS Lewis is one of the books in his series, the Chronicles of Narnia in which Christianity is portrayed through various fantasy creatures. God, for instance is portrayed as a talking Lion. What a wonderful series! What child hasn’t climbed into a closet and explored the back cracks in hope of finding an entrance to a new and exciting world after reading this book? I used to sit in a closet with the door closed and a flashlight reading my favorite books aft The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by CS Lewis is one of the books in his series, the Chronicles of Narnia in which Christianity is portrayed through various fantasy creatures. God, for instance is portrayed as a talking Lion. What a wonderful series! What child hasn’t climbed into a closet and explored the back cracks in hope of finding an entrance to a new and exciting world after reading this book? I used to sit in a closet with the door closed and a flashlight reading my favorite books after reading this series, in hopes that someday a door would open and take me to another realm. Of course, the white witch is my favorite character. I’m always attracted to the bad ones. The Lion, Aslan, is a wonderful character as well, but I have to admit, knowing that he was an analogy for God, changed my view of the story a bit and left me a bit disappointed. He was a bit cheesy. Or maybe typical is a better word. Which is why I almost wish I wouldn’t have known the true meaning of the books until after I read them. In any case, the stories were great, the first one being the best. (You always lose a little of the naiveté of the children as they get older) But the movies did them justice as well. Reading them again as an adult, found me a little bored, but still enchanted overall with the series. The next movie is due out soon and I can only hope they will continue to make the movies which were incredible. I highly recommend this series and consider it a classic as well. Note: I've recently started these again with my 5 yr old and we are loving it. I get to see it again through a child's eyes. And this time I haven't told him anything about the analogy to Christianity, however I do point out certain lessons such as forgiveness. (When Aslan has his talk with Edmund) I want him to figure it out on his own. We had a popcorn movie night and watched the movie together curled up under a blanket a few days ago and as I sat there, I thought to myself, this is why I had children. To experience all my favorite things over again through a child's eyes. It was the best time. ClassicsDefined.com

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    One of the least magical Narnia books, for my money. Puddleglum is a delight, but Jill and Eustace aren’t the best of the protagonists, particularly in their continued selfishness and quarrelsomeness. And Rillian never really gets over his terrible first impression, for all that you know he’s enchanted. And the antagonist, well. She’s more of the same type as Jadis, if more the seductress type. Actually, that point is what makes her less pleasant — her power is in seduction and sensuality, and t One of the least magical Narnia books, for my money. Puddleglum is a delight, but Jill and Eustace aren’t the best of the protagonists, particularly in their continued selfishness and quarrelsomeness. And Rillian never really gets over his terrible first impression, for all that you know he’s enchanted. And the antagonist, well. She’s more of the same type as Jadis, if more the seductress type. Actually, that point is what makes her less pleasant — her power is in seduction and sensuality, and there’s a kind of Christian horror of that which definitely hasn’t aged well, if it ever worked. I do wish we’d had more of the gnomes and their land of Bism, though! That bit of magic and adventure might have been enough to elevate the book, if it had actually been followed through. Originally posted on my blog.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    Probably my second-least favourite of the lot. Puddleglum is a fantastic character, but Jill was such a latecomer, and paired only with Eustace -- also a latecomer, and not the most sympathetic of them either... It doesn't really work for me in that sense. And of course, Caspian is old, and that's just... ugh. It doesn't have the delightful magic of Narnia, for the most part, not until the gnomes are talking about Bism, which is pretty darn late in the game. Still fun to reread, I suppose, but... Probably my second-least favourite of the lot. Puddleglum is a fantastic character, but Jill was such a latecomer, and paired only with Eustace -- also a latecomer, and not the most sympathetic of them either... It doesn't really work for me in that sense. And of course, Caspian is old, and that's just... ugh. It doesn't have the delightful magic of Narnia, for the most part, not until the gnomes are talking about Bism, which is pretty darn late in the game. Still fun to reread, I suppose, but... It's not really Narnia to me.

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