Music, Language, and the Brain - Download Free Ebook Now
Hot Best Seller

Music, Language, and the Brain

Availability: Ready to download

In the first comprehensive study of the relationship between music and language from the standpoint of cognitive neuroscience, Aniruddh D. Patel challenges the widespread belief that music and language are processed independently. Since Plato's time, the relationship between music and language has attracted interest and debate from a wide range of thinkers. Recently, scien In the first comprehensive study of the relationship between music and language from the standpoint of cognitive neuroscience, Aniruddh D. Patel challenges the widespread belief that music and language are processed independently. Since Plato's time, the relationship between music and language has attracted interest and debate from a wide range of thinkers. Recently, scientific research on this topic has been growing rapidly, as scholars from diverse disciplines, including linguistics, cognitive science, music cognition, and neuroscience are drawn to the music-language interface as one way to explore the extent to which different mental abilities are processed by separate brain mechanisms. Accordingly, the relevant data and theories have been spread across a range of disciplines. This volume provides the first synthesis, arguing that music and language share deep and critical connections, and that comparative research provides a powerful way to study the cognitive and neural mechanisms underlying these uniquely human abilities.


Compare

In the first comprehensive study of the relationship between music and language from the standpoint of cognitive neuroscience, Aniruddh D. Patel challenges the widespread belief that music and language are processed independently. Since Plato's time, the relationship between music and language has attracted interest and debate from a wide range of thinkers. Recently, scien In the first comprehensive study of the relationship between music and language from the standpoint of cognitive neuroscience, Aniruddh D. Patel challenges the widespread belief that music and language are processed independently. Since Plato's time, the relationship between music and language has attracted interest and debate from a wide range of thinkers. Recently, scientific research on this topic has been growing rapidly, as scholars from diverse disciplines, including linguistics, cognitive science, music cognition, and neuroscience are drawn to the music-language interface as one way to explore the extent to which different mental abilities are processed by separate brain mechanisms. Accordingly, the relevant data and theories have been spread across a range of disciplines. This volume provides the first synthesis, arguing that music and language share deep and critical connections, and that comparative research provides a powerful way to study the cognitive and neural mechanisms underlying these uniquely human abilities.

30 review for Music, Language, and the Brain

  1. 5 out of 5

    Stuart

    The most impressive book on the subject I've read. Not an easy read and not for most readers, but the far ranging surveys of scientific studies makes a good case for the linking of music and language. My notes: Octave & 5th very common Most scales 5 - 7 notes Most scale intervals between 1&3 semitones (2 common) Most scales are asymmetric-exceptions are Whole tone(6) and Slendro(5) Asymmetric scales help identify relation to tonic though cultural conditioning trumps in pattern recognition Tabl The most impressive book on the subject I've read. Not an easy read and not for most readers, but the far ranging surveys of scientific studies makes a good case for the linking of music and language. My notes: Octave & 5th very common Most scales 5 - 7 notes Most scale intervals between 1&3 semitones (2 common) Most scales are asymmetric-exceptions are Whole tone(6) and Slendro(5) Asymmetric scales help identify relation to tonic though cultural conditioning trumps in pattern recognition Tabla, Tibetan chant, Didgeridoo & Jews Harp rare cases of timbre used as defining structural element P. 33 timbral modulation P. 71 - parallels between music and speech sound elements - music uses pitch, speech uses timbre P. 96 - def of rhythm - systematic patterning of sound in terms of timing, accent, & grouping OR a systematic temporal, accentual, & phrasal patterning of sound People prefer: 1-beats coincide w note onsets 2-beats coincide w longer beats 3-regularity of beats 4-beats align w phrase beginning 5-beats align w harmonic change 6-beats align w onset of repeating melodic patterns Grouping perceived after lower, louder sounds or changes in intensity, duration, pitch, & timbre Languages traditionally have been rhythmically grouped as stress-timed & syllable-timed, but the deeper grouping is by vowel/consonant % vs. variability P.137-rhythm hypothesis - infants can only distinguish between languages of different rhythmic classes In contrast to music, rhythm tends to be a consequence rather than a construct of speech Durations in language and music rhythm match by country-composers may have language rhythm in their ears when writing Long-short duration word groupings in Japanese and short-long in English match rhythmic groupings in respective music Periodicity doesn't appear to play a part in speech rhythm P.224-Melody -implicit statistical learning in one domain (speech) may influence the creation of rhythmic & tonal patterns in another domain (music) P.233-Melodic Contour Deafness Hypothesis-tone deafness affects contour perception in both music and speech though speech has more robust way to deal with it because pitch change seldom affects meaning P.244-sequence in language influences meaning; in animals like whales & birds only identifies dialect of where they are from and meaning is either territorial warning or sexual advertisement P.259-order & meaning in music based on tension/release; reordering would produce different meaning Structure physicalist or cognitivist? - octave/5th likely physical. More complex structure likely cognitive/cultural conditioning-there are cultures where scales have little relation to overtone series yet have a tonal center. P.264-syntactic ambiguity not wanted in speech but may be desirable in music Similarities: hierarchical structure - multiple level of organization-morphemes>words>phrases>sentences / tones>chords>progressions>keys -"A linear sequence of elements is perceived in terms of hierarchical relations that convey organized patterns of meaning" Language-conceptual structure of reference Music-pattern of tension & resolution In both, parts can substitute out -same harmony, different chords -same sentence structure, different words Recursive structure-noun phrase within larger noun phrase; tension/release phrase within larger tension/release phrase Similarities: logical structure-both contrast structure w elaboration Grammar-verb agreement similar to harmonic agreement Neural-Shared Syntactic Integration Resource Hypothesis-music & language have different domain specific representations but share neural resources for activating and integrating these representations during processing P.282-hypothesis that when building sense of key, unexpected note or chord creates a processing cost due to tonal distance like distance cost in language between noun/verb/object P.300-Meaning Music can not translate from one culture to another (translating Beethoven into Gamelan) as language can People can still appreciate music from another culture even if perception is wrong (Westerners hearing Gamelan end of phrase as downbeat) "Music can have meaning for a listener simply because of it's sonic logic, without knowledge of the context that gave rise to the music or of an insider's understanding of it's cultural significance" 11 types of musical meaning: 1) structural interconnection of elements-"embodied" meaning; self-referential; intrinsic; introversive; intramusical Eduard Hanskick"The Beautiful in Music" 1854-musical aesthetics should be rooted in structure P.307-study shows that large scale structure such as pieces longer than a minute starting & ending in same key couldn't be perceived by highly trained musicians, even scrambling sections Some argue that structural beauty can produce emotions 2) music expressing emotion -some studies showing cross mapping between western, Indian & Javanese expressive states - ex. Happy=fast, bright, higher, less complex 3) Experience of emotion in listener - chills can be elicited in some listeners by sudden change in harmony, a violation of expectation (can occur in happy or sad music) 4) Motion-make listener want to move or music sounds like it's moving 5) Tone Painting 6) Musical Topics-dance forms, hunt music, pastoral, march 7) Social Associations-linking to cultural, ethnic or group identity 8) Imagery & Narrative 9) Association with Life Experience 10) Creating or Transforming the Self-creating an identity; entering a trance (Bali trance music) 11) Musical Structure & Cultural Concepts-cycles in Gamelan relate to cycles in their calendar and lining up of cycles/dates create important coincidences -western sense of societal progress reflected in harmonic progression Musical meaning -instr music lacks semantic content but suggests semantic concepts -leitmotifs communicate semantic meaning in opera, film -music meaning is much less specific and compositional-no system of structured combinations of semantic parts Pragmatics-drawing inferences and filling in the gaps not provided by semantics Kehler applies Hume's categories to language 1) resemblance-categorizing & correspondence 2) cause/effect 3) contiguity-sequence of events Musical coherence requires connections between segments that link into larger whole 1) resemblance-parallelism (similarity), contrast, elaboration 2) cause/effect-result, violated expectation 3) contiguity-temporal sequence-patterns or themes happen in specific order not because of intrinsic internal logic but because that is order culture has specified Hypothesis-brain processes music instr as superexpressive voices-the emotion perception modules don't recognize difference between vocal and other acoustic expressions as long as cues are same Music & evolution - neither adaption nor frill - something we invented that transforms life - has the power to change very structures of our brains Beat based rhythm-not related to language processing Synchronizing to a beat doesn't appear until age 4 though infants can perceive differences in duration, tempo and grouping structure Thai elephant orchestra can play at rhythmic regularity individually but not together Crickets synchronized really all readjusting to others to be first to appear most attractive for mating - unintended synchrony Fireflies flash together but within small tempo range, non complex rhythms No examples of animals being taught to move to a beat Evidence that humans have been shaped by natural selection for language, but not yet for music

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlyn Dennis

    My first thought after finishing this: WHEW. What a mental workout. This took about a month and a half to get through, which, for a book that I was reading on a semi-daily basis throughout that, is a hell of a long time. Still, totally worth it. Although it's not a pop science book, it's still accessible for those not in the field of neuroscience or linguistics. However, I'm not sure how readable or enjoyable this would be for someone without any exposure to general music theory and/or linguistic My first thought after finishing this: WHEW. What a mental workout. This took about a month and a half to get through, which, for a book that I was reading on a semi-daily basis throughout that, is a hell of a long time. Still, totally worth it. Although it's not a pop science book, it's still accessible for those not in the field of neuroscience or linguistics. However, I'm not sure how readable or enjoyable this would be for someone without any exposure to general music theory and/or linguistic terminology or ideas. I have a long classical musical background and have read a fair share of linguistics stuff, and it was still a challenge. I think what makes this a more valuable (and more difficult) read is the amount of detail throughout. Patel thoroughly discusses the implications, potential weaknesses, and possibilities of the current research. While there are a lot of new concepts and terminology to deal with, the writing is very clear. Overall, this is an extremely informative and well-written book, but definitely not for the casual reader.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    A range of fascinating topics here. I preferred the early material on processing, perception, and comparisons with other species more than the later topics on therapeutic angles, even though those are useful and potentially the most relevant.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Will

    "Linguistic and musical sound systems illustrate a common theme in the study of music-language relations. On the surface, the two domains are dramatically different. Music uses pitch in ways that speech does not, and speech organizes timbre to a degree seldom seen in music. Yet beneath these differences lie deep connections in terms of cognitive and neural processing. Most notably, in both domains the mind interacts with one particular aspect of sound (pitch in music, and timbre in speech) to cr "Linguistic and musical sound systems illustrate a common theme in the study of music-language relations. On the surface, the two domains are dramatically different. Music uses pitch in ways that speech does not, and speech organizes timbre to a degree seldom seen in music. Yet beneath these differences lie deep connections in terms of cognitive and neural processing. Most notably, in both domains the mind interacts with one particular aspect of sound (pitch in music, and timbre in speech) to create a perceptually discretized system. Importantly, this perceptual discretization is not an automatic byproduct of human auditory perception. For example, linguistic and musical sequences present the ear with continuous variations in amplitude, yet loudness is not perceived in terms of discrete categories. Instead, the perceptual discretization of musical pitch and linguistic timbre reflects the activity of a powerful cognitive system, built to separate within-category sonic variation from differences that indicate a change in sound category. Although music and speech differ in the primary acoustic feature used for sound category formation, it appears that the mechanisms that create and maintain learned sound categories in the two domains may have a substantial degree of overlap. Such overlap has implications for both practical and theoretical issues surrounding human communicative development. In the 20th century, relations between spoken and musical sound systems were largely explored by artists. For example, the boundary between the domains played an important role in innovative works such as Schoenberg's Pierrot Lunaire and Reich's Different Trains (cf. Risset, 1991). In the 21st century, science is finally beginning to catch up, as relations between spoken and musical sound systems prove themselves to be a fruitful domain for research in cognitive neuroscience. Such work has already begun to yield new insights into our species' uniquely powerful communicative abilities."

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dirk Elzinga

    For the most part this book reads like a gigantic lit review. Unavoidable, perhaps, but off-putting at the same time. I found myself marking up the bibliography section much more than the text itself. Still, I can't deny that this book fills a great gaping hole in the presentation of the research connecting music and language, and Patel should be commended for this work. (It should be noted that a great deal of the research summarized here is by Patel and colleagues.)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    An thorough, meticulous, nearly exhaustive review of the research on how the brain processes music and language. It's a tiring read, free of much one might call "style", but the chapter on Meaning masterfully pulls together the loads of information presented in the previous chapters. The book ends up being more suggestive than conclusive, but if you are interested in, for example, how the "music" of poetry is processed by the brain, this is the book for you.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kalle Oskar

    Patel's work is a dense study that musicians might understand, or neurobiologist might understand - at least in part. The Rhetorician doesn't quite get it. I'm working at understanding, but it is a difficult work. The struggle may be repaid sometime.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Scott Miles

    What an incredible resource! This book reads like a 520-page "Nature Reviews Neuroscience" paper, and a well-written one at that. Up-to-date, thorough, scientifically balanced, and intellectually bold, this is a volume that I hope will guide my own research for years to come.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sunlita

    Tough I really want to read this book, the price is quite expensive for me, so I should wait until I have a chance to buy this book. But from what I've read about this, it seems that this book's price is worthed to buy.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    A scholarly study by a neuroscientist of core aspects of being human. Patel argues that language use arose via natural selection but the evidence on balance indicates that music and musical affinity are side-effects rather than direct effects of selection.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nguyễn Thanh Tùng

    I want to discover more about the link between music and language.This book is really useful and helpful to me.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Everett Charters

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Wonderfully written just too technical for my poor little brain.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Eng

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Killen

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bob

  16. 5 out of 5

    Hadeer Ghazy

  17. 4 out of 5

    Vipul Bajpai

  18. 4 out of 5

    Manju

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ravi

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jason Stoessel

  21. 5 out of 5

    Stevanus Lianto

  22. 5 out of 5

    Oliver Sacks

  23. 5 out of 5

    Princess Geriane

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dawn Sadoway

  25. 5 out of 5

    Gonzalo Castro

  26. 4 out of 5

    Carlo

  27. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Church

  28. 4 out of 5

    AJ Brand

  29. 5 out of 5

    Renee Valdez

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bianca

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.