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They're in the "revenge" business Jess and Frank's father has stopped their allowances for four whole months That means that Jess can't go anywhere or do anything with her friends. Worse yet, Frank owes money to Buster Knell, the bully. How can Jess and Frank earn some cash -- fast? By starting a business, Own Back, Ltd. It specializes in revenge, which every kid needs to s They're in the "revenge" business Jess and Frank's father has stopped their allowances for four whole months That means that Jess can't go anywhere or do anything with her friends. Worse yet, Frank owes money to Buster Knell, the bully. How can Jess and Frank earn some cash -- fast? By starting a business, Own Back, Ltd. It specializes in revenge, which every kid needs to seek at some time, they figure. Most don't have the courage themselves. But Jess and Frank do -- for a price Lots of clients show up. But Jess and Frank soon discover that the revenge business can be pretty complicated, especially when it turns out that there's another one in town -- owned by Biddy Iremonger, the fiercely competitive local witch


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They're in the "revenge" business Jess and Frank's father has stopped their allowances for four whole months That means that Jess can't go anywhere or do anything with her friends. Worse yet, Frank owes money to Buster Knell, the bully. How can Jess and Frank earn some cash -- fast? By starting a business, Own Back, Ltd. It specializes in revenge, which every kid needs to s They're in the "revenge" business Jess and Frank's father has stopped their allowances for four whole months That means that Jess can't go anywhere or do anything with her friends. Worse yet, Frank owes money to Buster Knell, the bully. How can Jess and Frank earn some cash -- fast? By starting a business, Own Back, Ltd. It specializes in revenge, which every kid needs to seek at some time, they figure. Most don't have the courage themselves. But Jess and Frank do -- for a price Lots of clients show up. But Jess and Frank soon discover that the revenge business can be pretty complicated, especially when it turns out that there's another one in town -- owned by Biddy Iremonger, the fiercely competitive local witch

30 review for Witch's Business

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alex Ankarr

    A charmingly daft, deft, graceful early work. The workaround for swearing is hilarious! And beware, the Big Bad is actually quite scary. A darling of a read, and ought to be as celebrated as many of her other great works.

  2. 5 out of 5

    osoi

    У меня рука не поднимается поставить книге балл ниже четверки, ибо несмотря на аккуратно раскиданные триггеры, стандартные для любой сказки, злодейскому злодею наплевать на добрые намерения и хэппи-энды. А еще это история о том, насколько страшна бывает отвергнутая женщина, и что за маской интеллигентной бабуси может скрываться маньяк 99 уровня. Поэтому забываем на секундочку, что это детская книжка с законами жизни проще пробки, и ставим ей честную четверку. По размышлении она напоминает лайт-ве У меня рука не поднимается поставить книге балл ниже четверки, ибо несмотря на аккуратно раскиданные триггеры, стандартные для любой сказки, злодейскому злодею наплевать на добрые намерения и хэппи-энды. А еще это история о том, насколько страшна бывает отвергнутая женщина, и что за маской интеллигентной бабуси может скрываться маньяк 99 уровня. Поэтому забываем на секундочку, что это детская книжка с законами жизни проще пробки, и ставим ей честную четверку. По размышлении она напоминает лайт-версию Геймана, который точно так же любит перекручивать сказки до неузнаваемости и кидать детей в котел с непознаваемым злом, пририсовывая сбоку котиков, зачастую играющих важнейшую роль во всей книге. ДУД так вообще закрутила весь сюжет в кольцо, когда все пути ведут в начало истории – при всей предвзятости суждений о детских книжках, мне иногда было непросто уследить за кутерьмой переплетений и взаимосвязей. Думаю, читай я помедленнее и в оригинале, получила бы отменное удовольствие. Но злодейка неприлично хороша. Это вызов всем сказочным ведьмам, плевок в сторону канонов и рамок, в которые загоняют плохишей. Если бы детки не прощупали слабину, предварительно раззадорив душевные раны, она бы еще долго сидела на троне. Чесслово, даже обидно за нее – ведь сколько потенциала, а все потеряно из-за шайки малолеток, которые большую часть времени даже не понимают, что делают. В целом – неожиданно нетривиальная детская книжка. Зачет. annikeh.net

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Is it possible for there to be too many ideas in a novel? Especially in a children’s story of barely two hundred pages? In Diana Wynne Jones’ very first children’s novel images and themes and borrowings and emotions all come out fizzing and popping, like fireworks that one can gasp at while scarcely having time to reflect before the next effect bursts into view. The book is dedicated to one Jessica Frances, and what better compliment can an author pay to a dedicatee than including them, however o Is it possible for there to be too many ideas in a novel? Especially in a children’s story of barely two hundred pages? In Diana Wynne Jones’ very first children’s novel images and themes and borrowings and emotions all come out fizzing and popping, like fireworks that one can gasp at while scarcely having time to reflect before the next effect bursts into view. The book is dedicated to one Jessica Frances, and what better compliment can an author pay to a dedicatee than including them, however obliquely, in the story. Jess and Frank are twins who, bitter at being stopped their pocket money, set up what they hope is a money-making scheme that will simultaneously feed their need for cash while getting a sort of revenge for their economic disempowerment. Jones has written about youngsters’ constant cries of “It isn’t fair!” as not being an adequate response to their situation (Reflections 52-3). A better response, she says, is humour and by the end of the book humour is what wins the day rather than pure revenge, because, as Juvenal in his Satires said, “Revenge is sweet, sweeter than life itself — so say fools.” Jess and Frank put up their sign on the shed at the bottom of their garden: OWN BACK LTD REVENGE ARRANGED PRICE ACCORDING TO TASK ALL DIFFICULT TASKS UNDERTAKEN TREASURE HUNTED ETC. Soon they are inundated with requests by individuals wanting to ‘get their own back’, that is, revenge for real or perceived slights. Unfortunately, the twins’ attempts to make money backfire as they get paid back with increasing complications and problems. Neighbourhood bully Buster Knell wants one of Vernon Wilkins’ teeth because Vernon has stood up to bullying and knocked out one of Buster’s teeth. Two sisters, Jenny and Frankie Adams, want revenge on a dotty old lady for giving Jenny the Evil Eye and making her lame. Martin Taylor wants the twins to stop the two sisters from harassing him. Each job has unforeseen knock-on effects, turning ordinary events into nightmare situations. And the dotty old lady, Biddy Iremonger, is more than she seems. Diana Wynne Jones’ debut novel for young people appears to spring miraculously out of nowhere like Athena from Zeus’ head, setting both the tone and the standard for what came later. And its not just for young people either — adults with their broader life experiences can appreciate the nuances as much as the narrative and be startled by the cultural references as much as they’re dragged along by the plot. Let’s start with names. We’ve already been alerted by the dedication; now to turn our attention to the title. I remember from my schoolboy history a notorious British imperial adventure called the War of Jenkins’ Ear. In this ten-year naval war against Spain the initiating incident involved Robert Jenkins who, sailing from the West Indies, was stopped by a Spanish ship and then had his ear summarily sliced off. The British retaliation, which was only commenced some years later, was given its fatuous title a century later to underline the ridiculous nature of a minor fracas escalating into a major conflict; Jones did well to resist calling her story The War of Wilkins’ Tooth in emulation of this episode, bearing in mind the narrative parallels. Why tooth, though? She as good as cites the Old Testament injunction of ‘an eye for eye, a tooth for a tooth’, an amoral justification of vendetta which is endlessly played out around the world, to the shame of peoples and nations. Pride of place for choice of names goes to Biddy Iremonger. ‘Biddy’ is of course a common name given to old ladies of an inconsequential nature, a familiar form of Bridget, but this biddy is not inconsequential at all. Iremonger reminds one first of all of ‘ironmonger’, but here it also suggests someone who deals in anger, a contradiction of that ‘biddy’ label. At one stage her name is misspelled as B Ayamunga, and I’m sure I’m not the first to see leap out the name of that infamous Slavic folklore witch Baba Yaga. Jones would have been very familiar with this bogey figure, not least from Old Peter’s Russian Tales, a book by Arthur Ransome which her father grudgingly provided when she and her sisters were young. Ransome (whom Jones actually saw when she was evacuated during the war to the Lake District) retold a Russian folktale as “Baba Yaga and the Little Girl with the Kind Heart”, describing the witch as having iron teeth as well as the cannibalistic tendencies of the Hansel and Gretel witch; she lived in a little hut which stood on hen’s legs and flew around in a mortar with her pestle and besom broom. The hut on fowl’s legs famously features as one of Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition, inspired by a real exhibition which included Victor Hartmann’s design for a cuckoo clock based on Baba Yaga’s hut. Like her Russian counterpart Biddy has a hut with a cockerel on the roof (though the structure doesn’t move) and a cat that prowls around; though she lacks the iron teeth the name Iremonger is suggestive. And — the clincher here — she not only is a witch with terrifying and almost limitless powers but also proves capable of enormous cruelty to children. Powerful. Vindictive. Cruel. How can she ever be defeated, and by mere kids? The answer seems to be to use humour and a sense of playfulness. Laughing at an opponent is a rather dangerous strategy but generally laughter can help raise the spirits, while a sense of playfulness can lead to solutions. Jess’ remembrance of a favourite fairytale, Puss in Boots, allows her to work out how to defeat Biddy. As the author herself points out (Reflections 126) Jones doesn’t consciously use folktale motifs, rather they ‘present themselves’ and the ‘weight they carry is only to be grasped intuitively’, so Jones’ intuitive usage of the motif only represents poetic justice. In almost the same breath she references Wagner’s Rheingold, specifically the point at which Alberich is tricked into shape-shifting into a toad’s form, a hint at her multiple influences. The mention of the treasure and waters of the Rhine draws in more strands that manifest themselves in Wilkins' Tooth. The river that runs past Biddy’s hut (echoing the tears that run down the faces of a couple of characters) is not just a reminder of Baba Yaga’s difficulties in crossing water but a nod towards the treasure of the Rhine Maidens, the Rheingold of Wagner’s music drama and German myth. Another strand running through this novel is the search for missing heirlooms in the form of treasure, a common enough motif to be sure. Here I am forcibly reminded of E Nesbit’s The Treasure Seekers — this being, as the subtitle proclaims, 'the Adventures of the Bastable Children in Search of A Fortune. Jones’ son Colin Burrows tells us that Nesbit was “the biggest literary influence on his mother” and “the main spirit behind Diana Wynne Jones’ fiction”. I can’t help thinking that Jess and Frank’s selfish efforts to raise cash becoming the selfless quest for Jenny and Frankie’s family heirlooms is largely inspired by Nesbit’s first children’s novel; the transformation of pure revenge (‘getting one’s own back’) into natural justice (getting the Adams family’s own heirlooms back) is in the same Nesbit tradition of using ideal or magical worlds “to work out real problems from their own lives” (as Colin Burrows puts it, Reflections 344-5). There is so much literary treasure in this apparently artless story. I could mention the use of colour for example, exemplified by the rainbow which, contrasting with the drab surrounding neighbourhood, leads to missing treasure, or the diverse children — some West Indian or red-haired and others with disabilities or social deprivation – who somehow learn to work together in the face of a frightening external threat. To my mind there are few faults, and any can be laid at the door of a debut author, such as the citation of specific monetary sums which, coming soon after the novelty of UK decimalisation in 1971, too soon fell prey to inflation and which appear laughably small four decades on. Rising above it all are Jones’ characters who, apart from the villainous of the piece, are not one-dimensional but variously recognisable from any social situation; Jones’ strength here is in allowing the reader to identify with any number of characters, not just the main protagonists. I asked if it were possible for one short novel to have too many ideas, the range of which I have tried to hint at in this review. At the very least it must surely be preferable to a novel with too few ideas; but a book where you continue to make connections long after you have read it must be a very valuable one. Treasure seekers need not search in vain. http://wp.me/s2oNj1-wilkins

  4. 5 out of 5

    Audrey Jane

    Witch's Business is one of Diana Wynne Jones first books (published in 1973). It was originally titled 'Wilkins' Tooth' because trouble starts when one of the characters asked for Wilkins' Tooth as retribution for what has been done to him. Although Witch's Business is very fitting too. The children start a revenge business called Own Back Ltd. to earn a bit of money but soon it gets out of hand and they start to regret it. I like D.W. Jones writings and can recognize her style out of thousands. Witch's Business is one of Diana Wynne Jones first books (published in 1973). It was originally titled 'Wilkins' Tooth' because trouble starts when one of the characters asked for Wilkins' Tooth as retribution for what has been done to him. Although Witch's Business is very fitting too. The children start a revenge business called Own Back Ltd. to earn a bit of money but soon it gets out of hand and they start to regret it. I like D.W. Jones writings and can recognize her style out of thousands. But this book wasn't one of her best. I do not recommend to try D.W. Jones' writings with this book but rather with the Howl's Moving Castle series which I highly recommend. The writing in Witch's Business didn't flow that well and lacked depth, something that is definitely more present in her later books. The story didn't really grab me. Also this book is clearly meant for a very young audience (compared to her other books). It's the kind of book you would read for your children. Still I'm enjoying D.W. Jones books so much and Witch's Business is not a bad book at all. All D.W. Jones books are intended for a young audience but they show a lot of maturity, especially compared to today's YA. Definitely planning to try her Chrestomanci series next.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    I didn't realize this book is actually from 1974! Had a hard time with the weird British kid's slang, but am fully prepared with phases like "curried-tonsil scum" and "disemboweled" (a common adjective in here!) and "stomach-juicing". Oh, and it's about revenge. And how it's bad. Bad revenge. Bad. Don't do it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Harold Ogle

    An interesting read, and at the same time a very enjoyable one, because Diana Wynne Jones wrote so well. Some claim this to be Jones' first novel. I have no idea, but it was written in 1973, so there's a lot of strange antiquated cultural references that one must wade through in the first couple of chapters in order to get into the thick of the story, because Jones wrote a story here that was contemporary to the time and place of 1973 England. This means that there were weird British terms like " An interesting read, and at the same time a very enjoyable one, because Diana Wynne Jones wrote so well. Some claim this to be Jones' first novel. I have no idea, but it was written in 1973, so there's a lot of strange antiquated cultural references that one must wade through in the first couple of chapters in order to get into the thick of the story, because Jones wrote a story here that was contemporary to the time and place of 1973 England. This means that there were weird British terms like "West Indian" that I had to mull over (and in the end, research) in order to know what she'd meant (it means from the "West Indies," a term for the Caribbean that I would have thought died out in the 17th century. Nowadays we would say "Jamaican" or "Haitian" or just "Caribbean" if we didn't know from which island his parents emigrated). Aside from the occasional jarring bit like that, the book is wonderful. It has to do with two siblings who owe money and who've had their allowance cut off. So they hatch a scheme called "Own Back" (itself a reference to an antiquated English expression), which has nothing to do with anatomy and everything to do with retrieval and/or revenge. In a nice twist, every plan they have to give someone his comeuppance goes awry, resulting in more trouble and more debt in a terrible spiral of bad decisions. I'd say the book might be too intense for younger readers, as soon they stumble across plots of murder, mental domination, and Evil that are pretty frightening but which, presented from the kids' point of view, are taken in stride as the generally unfair lot that kids have in life. There's bullies and violence and indifferent adults. And magic. Of course there's magic, because it's a Diana Wynne Jones book, with yet another completely different take on magic and how magic works. She's really amazing, to have written so many books and each of them with a completely separate internal logic for how magic works. Here's what happens: (view spoiler)[Jess and Frank mope in the garden shed, which they treat as a retreat/hideout, dejected because they have no pocket money and their allowance has been suspended as a punishment for breaking furniture in the house. Frank is particularly despondent, because he bet the town bully for 10p and he lost the bet. So it's only a matter of time before the bully comes and terrorizes him. So Jess thinks: why not form a little business venture to earn some cash? They could find treasure, enact revenge, and do other odd and/or difficult jobs for people, on commission! So they whip out a sign and open up shop right there in the shed. First the bully arrives and scares them into taking his commission (not for cash but for erasing Frank's debt): getting revenge. Vernon Wilkins fought the bully and knocked a tooth out, so now the bully wants a Wilkins tooth in exchange. Sensing doom, Jess and Frank visit the Wilkins house with no ideas. Vernon helpfully yanks out one of his kid brother's baby teeth (which was about to come out anyway) and gives it to Jess and Frank despite their objections, on the promise that they will pay him 5p when they can. They hand it over to the bully as a "Wilkins tooth." Meanwhile, two weird orphan girls, Frankie and Jenny, request that they enact revenge on the homeless village crackpot, Biddy Iremonger, whom they claim is a witch. They offer antiquated currency that is no longer legal tender in exchange. Then they are hired by Martin to get revenge on Frankie and Jenny...and so on, and so on. In the end, Biddy is actually an evil witch, and she ensorcells nearly everyone before the kids can trick her into defeating herself, much like in old fairy tales. (hide spoiler)] It was well-written and fun, once I got into the rhythm of it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    "Frank and Jess thought Own Back Ltd. was an excellent idea when they first invented it. Three days later, they were not so sure" (1). That's how this book starts, and reading those sentences, you know you're in for a lesson-learning sort of book, but this being Diana Wynne Jones, it's not too heavy-handed. Own Back Ltd. starts over Easter break, when Frank and Jess are bemoaning their lack of pocket money: they broke a chair, and their pocket money's been stopped. It's Jess who thinks of it fir "Frank and Jess thought Own Back Ltd. was an excellent idea when they first invented it. Three days later, they were not so sure" (1). That's how this book starts, and reading those sentences, you know you're in for a lesson-learning sort of book, but this being Diana Wynne Jones, it's not too heavy-handed. Own Back Ltd. starts over Easter break, when Frank and Jess are bemoaning their lack of pocket money: they broke a chair, and their pocket money's been stopped. It's Jess who thinks of it first, wondering if "people pay you to do bad things for them" (p 2). Frank agrees that people must, and later that night the two of them make a notice advertising their new business: "Own Back Ltd./Revenge Arranged/Price According to Task," for starters, and then, for good measure: "All Difficult Tasks Undertaken/Treasure Hunted, Etc." (3). Though business is slow at first, things pick up quickly, and (surprise surprise) Jess and Frank soon find themselves in over their heads. While this book is not as complex or nuanced as Dogsbody or Fire and Hemlock, or as endearing as Charmed Life or The Lives of Christopher Chant, it is a sweet and fun read with some details that made me smile, like when Jess, at one point, says something without really thinking about it and then ends up "catching up with the conversation and discovering she meant what she said" (102). (I love that way of describing the situation, which feels really true to me: you say something in a sort of knee-jerk way, someone questions you on it, and then as you think it through and articulate things more fully, you realize you did indeed mean what you said, even if you couldn't initially have said why.) The writing seems self-conscious sometimes—there's lots of "as Jess said afterward," which I found sort of jarring, but I love how Jess, on two different occasions, uses storytelling or a knowledge of stories to solve problems—first when she distracts Frankie and Jenny (those two odd little girls) from their crankiness by telling them a story, and then again at the end of the book. I also appreciate the descriptions of the setting, the sense of place: this book is set in England near Easter, a Britain of potting sheds and allotment gardens and "a marshy, tangled, waste strip beside the river where everyone threw rubbish," a Britain where spring is "blank and bleak as winter," rainy and wet and grey (4-5).

  8. 5 out of 5

    Somesuchlike

    It's taken me forever to get round to reading this book - something about it always put me off. For some reason it's always struck me as not really being a Diana Wynne Jones book (even before I read that she felt the same way). I don't know if it was the blurb or the title or the cover or what, but something about it has always been offputting and profoundly unmemorable. That said, I enjoyed it far more than I expected to. It's an interesting mix of 70s childrens' fiction expectations - the self- It's taken me forever to get round to reading this book - something about it always put me off. For some reason it's always struck me as not really being a Diana Wynne Jones book (even before I read that she felt the same way). I don't know if it was the blurb or the title or the cover or what, but something about it has always been offputting and profoundly unmemorable. That said, I enjoyed it far more than I expected to. It's an interesting mix of 70s childrens' fiction expectations - the self-conciously diverse cast, the obvious moral at the end - with some nice Diana Wynne Jones touches. The two protagonists, Frank and Jess, are quite possibly the blandest characters in any of Diana Wynne Jones's books, but the rest of the cast is much better - Vernon, the eerie Adams sisters with 'famine poster eyes', and especially Biddy Iremonger the witch. Jones has a disarming writing style: stylistically her books are very child-friendly and simply written, and then disturbing little details start creeping in around the edges, and somehow that was even more effective than usual here when the style was even more childish that usual - the cheeriness with with Biddy talks about cursing little children, Frankie and Jenny's enchanted, neglectful father, the way she controls Buster and his gang then sets invisible insectoid 'things' to crawl all over them when they disobey her... there's some creepy stuff here. All in all, it's not up to Jones's usual standard, but it's still a fun little book with some interesting ideas, and I'm glad I read it. Aside from anything else, Biddy Iremonger is pretty clearly Baba Yaga, and anything with Baba Yaga in it gets a thumbs up from me.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Althea Ann

    This is one of Diana Wynne Jones' earlier books. (It was originally published in 1973, under the title 'Wilkins' Tooth') It's definitely aimed at a younger audience than many of her books - it's a kids' book, probably for people around 10. But I didn't feel that it had the 'condescending' feeling that I complained of in 'Dogsbody' at all. I admit that I enjoyed it! In it, a group of kids decide to make some pocket money by going into the revenge business. Soon this leads them to tangle with the to This is one of Diana Wynne Jones' earlier books. (It was originally published in 1973, under the title 'Wilkins' Tooth') It's definitely aimed at a younger audience than many of her books - it's a kids' book, probably for people around 10. But I didn't feel that it had the 'condescending' feeling that I complained of in 'Dogsbody' at all. I admit that I enjoyed it! In it, a group of kids decide to make some pocket money by going into the revenge business. Soon this leads them to tangle with the tough gang from the neighborhood, the two 'weird' sisters that no one likes, and some other kids from the neighborhood. Everyone wants revenge on someone, and the situation is getting complicated - but it goes from complicated to worse when the strange old Biddy who lives in a hut and is suspected of being a witch begins to warn them off... revenge might be "Witch's Business" and kids have no right to cut in....

  10. 5 out of 5

    Magali

    One of DWJ's first novels and it definitely is missing some of the charming sparkle of her later work. This felt a lot like Black Maria, actually--a bit too dark and serious thematically to fit the tone of the story and characters. Unlike Black Maria though, the cast was larger and just full of delightful characters. I loved Jess and Frankie the most. Definitely recommend this one, but not as enthusiastically as, say, Dalemark (for darker themes) or Chrestomanci (for children getting up to their One of DWJ's first novels and it definitely is missing some of the charming sparkle of her later work. This felt a lot like Black Maria, actually--a bit too dark and serious thematically to fit the tone of the story and characters. Unlike Black Maria though, the cast was larger and just full of delightful characters. I loved Jess and Frankie the most. Definitely recommend this one, but not as enthusiastically as, say, Dalemark (for darker themes) or Chrestomanci (for children getting up to their ears in magical trouble). 3 solid stars; may not reread but definitely enjoyed my time with this book!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Zoe

    I should note that I have the British version, which is called Wilkins' Tooth. First few times I read it I wasn't particularly impressed, but the last re-read I quite enjoyed. Not her most in-depth plot or world building, but I liked her characters a lot. She makes them come across quite clearly without resorting to lots of description. And I still love the "colourful language". Chartreuse with purple polka dots!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

    I always love her books. This one reads a little more like a children's story than others, but still really good.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nina

    Ini buku pertama Mz. Jones yang saya baca. Saya beruntung nemu buku ini di lapak buku bekas dengan harga yang sangat ramah di kantong. Tadinya saya pikir ini hanya buku mid grade biasa, tapi ternyata bagus juga. Buku lawas ini terbit tahun 1973 (tapi di GR tidak ada profil bukunya, ya akhirnya saya pakai edisi ini saja. Cover buku yg saya punya warnanya ungu dan bagus) dan membacanya serasa bernostalgia ketika teknologi tidak semaju sekarang. Kakak beradik Frank dan Jess membuka part time job set Ini buku pertama Mz. Jones yang saya baca. Saya beruntung nemu buku ini di lapak buku bekas dengan harga yang sangat ramah di kantong. Tadinya saya pikir ini hanya buku mid grade biasa, tapi ternyata bagus juga. Buku lawas ini terbit tahun 1973 (tapi di GR tidak ada profil bukunya, ya akhirnya saya pakai edisi ini saja. Cover buku yg saya punya warnanya ungu dan bagus) dan membacanya serasa bernostalgia ketika teknologi tidak semaju sekarang. Kakak beradik Frank dan Jess membuka part time job setelah mereka merusakkan kursi di rumah dan orang tua mereka menolak memberi uang saku. Selama liburan, usaha mereka terbilang aneh: membalaskan dendam pada klien mereka dengan imbalan 5 sen. Klien mereka anak-anak yang ada di sekitar tempat tinggal mereka. Ketika berhubungan dengan Biddy Iremonger, Jess, Frank dan anak-anak di sana mengalami petualangan yang terbilang menakutkan. Biddy wanita tua yang tinggal dekat sungai. Dia penyihir yang membuat orang patuh padanya, membuat bengkak wajah Silas adik Vernon, membuat pincang seorang anak perempuan. Biddy berakhir seperti dalam cerita Puss in Boots. Yang jelas buku ini enak diikuti. Aroma kertas menguning kecoklatannya mengingatkan saya pada suasana perpus daerah yg biasanya saya kunjungi waktu kecil :D

  14. 5 out of 5

    Debby Allen

    A bit of a mess, a bit of a slog but eh, it's okay. Definitely not her best, and would likely not have tried any more if this had been my first.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    Hilarious!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Fifteen children work together to save their families from a local witch. One of my favorite authors.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Pam Baddeley

    This is the author's first book for children, as she had an adult novel published a few years previously. It was published in 1973 but has some of the aspects we have come to expect from DWJ fiction such as a group of disparate characters who have to rub along together and learn tolerance as they work to achieve a joint goal. Brother and sister Frank and Jess have had their pocket money stopped after breaking a chair and they come up with a money making scheme, Own Back Ltd, which they start to r This is the author's first book for children, as she had an adult novel published a few years previously. It was published in 1973 but has some of the aspects we have come to expect from DWJ fiction such as a group of disparate characters who have to rub along together and learn tolerance as they work to achieve a joint goal. Brother and sister Frank and Jess have had their pocket money stopped after breaking a chair and they come up with a money making scheme, Own Back Ltd, which they start to run from a shed in the allotments. The problem that immediately arises is that the local bully Buster, to whom Frank owes a small amount of money (the amounts in this book are very small - 5p, 10p, because of the publication date) insists that they pay him back by carrying out a revenge attack on a boy called Vernon Wilkins. Vernon knocked out the bully's tooth (when the bully and his gang tried to rough him up) and so he wants them to knock one out in return. Neither sibling is the violent type so they go to see Vernon to explain their difficult position. Vernon oblidges by extracting a loose baby tooth from his little brother Silas. Unfortunately, Buster then gives the tooth to a strange old woman called Biddy Irestone who lives in a hut on nearby waste ground and has a reputation among the children - later found out to be deserved - of being a witch. He asks Biddy to use it to inflict a painful face swelling spell on Vernon, but it affects Silas instead as he was the tooth's donor. Soon Jess and Frank are involved in more and more complications as other children approach them for 'jobs'. They end up not making any money out of it and instead being dragged into the machinations of Biddy Irestone who is probably one of the nastiest villains in DWJ's fiction, judging by the way she seems to derive pleasure from tormenting children. She has put spells on some of the local children just for fun, such as making one girl limp, and taunts them that the spell will only be taken off when they find the 'heirlooms' belonging to this girl and her sister (which she has stolen, along with the family's other valuables, leaving them living in a rundown house with no money to fix it). None of the adults in the area believe the children about Biddy, and the father and aunt of the two sisters even appear to be in thrall to her. A lot of the appeal of the story is the strange characters, not just the witch. The two sisters are oddly Victorian and live with their peculiar father and aunt. Their mother is missing and they have a grudge against another boy, Martin, because his parents bought the bigger house where they used to live, and turned it into a nursing home. Buster and his gang swear all the time but because this was published in 1973 when even mild swear words were not allowed in children's fiction, these are portrayed by colour subsitutions - orange, purple and crimson mainly. There is a particularly comedic section where the two sisters attempt to search their house for the 'heirlooms' and later when the boys venture onto the roof with even more slapstick results. One aspect that would probably be changed if the book were republished now, is that Buster uses an abbreviated version of a racist term completely unacceptable now, to refer to Vernon who is black. Although this shows what a nasty character Buster is, I think it would be changed to something else. The aunt character also uses another derogatory racial term a couple of times and it is definitely meant to show her in a bad light, as the second time she says it Vernon's dad is present and looks annoyed. However, it isn't commented on by the characters as it should be, although it shows that DWJ was aware this wasn't acceptable, just didn't highlight how unacceptable. However, this book is probably quite an early one in the history of children's literature to portray ethnic individuals positively, with Vernon having a key and quite heroic role throughout. To sum up, the book is quite a fun light read but lacks the complexity of DWJ's later fiction. However, the seeds are there for her later more complex treatment of the main theme, for example, "Black Maria" where another nasty witch character does horrible things to children just because she can.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

    Unexpected magic. One of Diana Wynne Jones' first books, and I'm not sure how I would feel about it if it was my first time encountering her. It's definitely less well developed than her later stories. I really enjoyed it though, and it has her distinctive style. Many of the elements of this story recur in her later writing.

  19. 4 out of 5

    An Odd1

    Funny, fast, easy to read, exotic flavor of UK village where witches are real and Knickerbocker Glories are ice-cream sundaes. The frustrations of children who see adults manipulated but can do nothing. Mucky marsh, smelly swamp stickily globs on plimsoll sneakers and burns eyes. Hide out in prickly gorse bushes and run run run from bullies. Can tiny eyeball charms fend off the Evil Eye? Like Agatha Christie and J.K. Rowling, US publishers monkey with titles, formerly "Wilkin's Tooth", and shoul Funny, fast, easy to read, exotic flavor of UK village where witches are real and Knickerbocker Glories are ice-cream sundaes. The frustrations of children who see adults manipulated but can do nothing. Mucky marsh, smelly swamp stickily globs on plimsoll sneakers and burns eyes. Hide out in prickly gorse bushes and run run run from bullies. Can tiny eyeball charms fend off the Evil Eye? Like Agatha Christie and J.K. Rowling, US publishers monkey with titles, formerly "Wilkin's Tooth", and should lay off. Frank Pirie owes ten pence bet to bully Buster, broke a chair with sister Jesse aka Jessica, so their pocket money is stopped till summer, but vacation has already started. Father took down front gate notice "Errands run", disallowing "immoral earnings" p2. They tack sign "Own Back Ltd. Revenge Arranged. Price according to task." to door of potting shed along well-trodden allotment side-path, out of parental view p3. The train of interdependent clients gets complicated, all leading back to vicious powerful witch Biddy Iremonger. First customer, Buster, the most loud and vile of his gang, lost a tooth to "curried-tonsil scum" taller older paperboy Vernon Wilkins, will forego debt for "one of Wilkin's pineapple-puking teeth" p9, and will return in one hour for the "slimy poisoned-unwinding-bowel tooth" p10. Jess recalls biblical quotation "If his eye offends the, black it. Only Vernon's West Indian, so it won't show". p11. Vernon plucks out younger brother Silas' loosest wobbler instead, fulfilling the letter of the agreement. But Biddy makes the tooth-owner's face swell painfully "tight and shiny .. more purple than black" p47 in return for owning nine of the bullies. The youngest Silas escapes, tearfully pleads for his brothers. Adams sisters Frankie and limping Jenny, want Biddy's lame curse lifted. Their father reports to Biddy, and obeys her too. Martin, whose family took over big Adams' house for a convalescent (mostly gaga aged) home, wants the Adams girls to stop pestering him, he's not allowed to hit girls. One of the patients "we have to call them guests" p81 Jessica gives tiny eyeball charms to her namesake Jesse. One for her charm bracelet, the other for Frank's pocket, and the duo are noticeably more protected against evil. Jenny's emerald necklace, Frankie's diamond necklace, their mother, and much wealth vanished at the same time. Hunting everywhere, and trying to help everyone, leads to cooperation between the children, to lift Biddy's enslavement. When her tumble-down hut in the smelly swamp magically enlarges to trap them, their only hope lies with her equally beaten black cat familiar. (view spoiler)[Jesse asks the cat to remember the ending of Puss and Boots. (After Shrek and imitation, I did not.) She challenges Biddy to prove her power by transforming into an elephant, then a mouse, crunched down by the cat, ending all the bad spells. Patient Jessica is the Adams' vanished mother, back home after her husband restored to senses. Junk in Biddy's yard that sparkles when looked at sideways is really treasure, and Buster insists the money all be returned to the Adams. "Nobody could call him reformed .. still used slimy and disembowelled language" p200, but everyone is friendlier. "Knickerbocker Glories all round to celebrate. and milk shakes, too, if your innards will stand" p201. (hide spoiler)]

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kaion

    Wilkin's Tooth (1973) was Diana Wynne Jones's first children's novel, in what become a rather prolific career. Reassuringly, even great writers don't jump out of the ground fully formed, and Tooth is a charming but unremarkable affair best left for completists. There's a vague throwback quality to Tooth that makes it feel dated in a way Jones's later work doesn't. The revenge business siblings Jess and Frank set up their garage and the vaguely mid-century setting recall Encyclopedia Brown, while Wilkin's Tooth (1973) was Diana Wynne Jones's first children's novel, in what become a rather prolific career. Reassuringly, even great writers don't jump out of the ground fully formed, and Tooth is a charming but unremarkable affair best left for completists. There's a vague throwback quality to Tooth that makes it feel dated in a way Jones's later work doesn't. The revenge business siblings Jess and Frank set up their garage and the vaguely mid-century setting recall Encyclopedia Brown, while the plot ("the wacky incursion of magic into the everyday teaches children to be careful what they wish for" storyline) feels indebted to E. Nesbit. A more distinctive feature is that the adults are not completely excluded from the action: at least one parent in the story is finally able to acknowledge the magic and eventually takes a semi-active part in the plot. That the neighborhood witch is both elementally monstrous and mundanely evil feels a little Dahl-ian, but adds more menace to what otherwise would be a bit of lark. The uncharacteristic roughness of Wilkin's Tooth actually provides an opportunity to understand more clearly how DWJ constructed her stories. The motely gang of children who work at cross-purposes but eventually (reluctantly) team up to save the day would become a staple of Jones's fiction, but here the characters are not quite developed enough for a true clash of personalities to work. Possibly there are just too many kids for the short length of the story; some hardly get names let alone personalities. There's some implication that there's some class consciousness involved in the delay of the team-up. Our enterprising duo are solidly middle-class, while the town bully and the popular boy are from the rougher side of town. The "snobby" sisters are some sort of post-Edwardian impoverished gentry, complete with lost family mansion (now occupied by another kid, whose family runs it as a nursing home). This implication never quite becomes subtext, and as such, the eventual team-up and defeat of the witch never address the symbolic exorcism of class division between the children. In contrast, Jones's next work, The Ogre Downstairs is centered clearly around the discord in a modern "blended" family where the kids find their new living situation less than Brady-Bunch-esque, even before a magic chemistry set gets thrown into the mix. It's this close unity between theme and plot that provides the framework for Ogre, without which the whimsy and humor wouldn't work. I've been hoarding unread DWJ novels for a while, but I still can't believe I've only got two left! Rating: 2 stars

  21. 5 out of 5

    Honya

    As always, Diana Wynne Jones brings a creative, unique tale in Witch’s Business. The entire story is a sort of If You Give a Mouse a Cookie chain of events, with attempts to solve one problem leading right into new problems, again and again. It really is quite the cautionary tale, although most folks contemplating revenge are unlikely to end up in as much trouble as Frank, Jess, and their friends encounter with their local witch. As expected of Jones’ writing, the characters, prose, and plot are As always, Diana Wynne Jones brings a creative, unique tale in Witch’s Business. The entire story is a sort of If You Give a Mouse a Cookie chain of events, with attempts to solve one problem leading right into new problems, again and again. It really is quite the cautionary tale, although most folks contemplating revenge are unlikely to end up in as much trouble as Frank, Jess, and their friends encounter with their local witch. As expected of Jones’ writing, the characters, prose, and plot are all excellent. I really can’t praise her writing style in general enough. I particularly liked, in this story, that 1) the characters’ presuppositions about one another are challenged, and 2) they end up becoming friends with people they would never have considered interacting with before the events unfolded. The growing relationships are quite interesting, and I think the story’s a good challenge to us all in regards to those two items. I also enjoyed the slightly old-fashioned country setting; it’s the sort of place where it seems like anything could happen. Which it did. Witch’s Business is an ideal adventure/fantasy/slice-of-life story for upper elementary to high-school readers, but even better, it’s the sort of tale that just about anyone of any age can enjoy. Highly recommended.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    A brilliant kids book (and I mean little kids, not young adults... I wouldn't necessarily recommend this for anyone above 12 years old), Diana Wynne Jones draws upon classic fairy tales such as Puss In Boots to put together a charming story told by a master storyteller. DWJ's books stand out not just for their great plot, but also for their language. Just because the story line is watered down for younger readers (or listeners, in my son's case), her writing is at the top of its game. American re A brilliant kids book (and I mean little kids, not young adults... I wouldn't necessarily recommend this for anyone above 12 years old), Diana Wynne Jones draws upon classic fairy tales such as Puss In Boots to put together a charming story told by a master storyteller. DWJ's books stand out not just for their great plot, but also for their language. Just because the story line is watered down for younger readers (or listeners, in my son's case), her writing is at the top of its game. American readers might be a bit thrown by some of the British-slang... possibly of DWJ's own invention. Not being British, I'm not sure. For example, "Get Your Own Back" is an important phrase in the book which appears to mean "get even" or "get revenge." Likewise one of the major characters in the book is a big cusser, but his foul language tends to be along the lines of "zombie burger" or "slime puke." He also doesn't really repeat himself, so it's unlikely your child is going to walk around using any of these phrases to color his language... and even if he did, I don't think anyone would mind!

  23. 4 out of 5

    G.L. Jackson

    Witch's Business tells the story of a brother and sister who, finding their allowances withheld, decide to open up a revenge business. In the process they cross paths with a local witch. There are some great colorful characters along the way, and some reminiscent of characters I've seen in other books by this author. The children have to solve several mysteries in order to extricate themselves from the witch's ire, which they manage to do in quite a novel (if not entirely unpredictable) way. Whil Witch's Business tells the story of a brother and sister who, finding their allowances withheld, decide to open up a revenge business. In the process they cross paths with a local witch. There are some great colorful characters along the way, and some reminiscent of characters I've seen in other books by this author. The children have to solve several mysteries in order to extricate themselves from the witch's ire, which they manage to do in quite a novel (if not entirely unpredictable) way. While this is not my favorite book by Diana Wynne Jones, it's still an exquisite little pearl among the genre. It's short, designed for a younger audience than many of her other works. Breezy, just convoluted enough to keep younger readers interested and adult readers laughing at the intrigue and machinations. The book is basically a puzzle that unravels the further it goes. One thing I have to point out is that in many of Jones' books, the denouement happens so quickly I can feel cheated. It's a trademark of hers, that rush that builds up to the ending. This one takes a little more time and proceeds at a slightly less hurried pace. I appreciated that. It's sweet.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rachael

    Working my way through everything Diana Wynne Jones has ever written, and this is the second thing she published. It wasn't a bad book by any means, but it shows. It has hints of things we'll see in her future books, like enemies teaming up, people rethinking their relationships with people (in this case, with bullies), and witches controlling people. So although it was enjoyable (short, simple, cute), I would say that it generally lacked depth. There are a couple of times when we get glimpses i Working my way through everything Diana Wynne Jones has ever written, and this is the second thing she published. It wasn't a bad book by any means, but it shows. It has hints of things we'll see in her future books, like enemies teaming up, people rethinking their relationships with people (in this case, with bullies), and witches controlling people. So although it was enjoyable (short, simple, cute), I would say that it generally lacked depth. There are a couple of times when we get glimpses into character or home life for the children who are the main characters, but for the most part, they are plot-driven. The story is quick and sweet, but lacks the personality that future Jones characters have. They move fast, and they change over the course of the book from wanting pocket money to wanting to do good, and there is a typical Jones collection of plots that get neatly untangled at the end, but nothing about the characters is particularly memorable in any way. Giving it three stars because I enjoyed it, but it was definitely not one of my favorites of her books.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Dehoff

    I believe this was Jones's first children's novel, published in 1973. An earlier title for it was Wilkins' Tooth, which makes sense once you've read a bit of it, but probably wasn't as enticing to potential readers. While not as good as many of her later books, it does establish the theme she'd use frequently of normal people gradually discovering that the supernatural exists, leading to a mixture of the mystical and the mundane. The plot involves two kids setting up a revenge business, only to I believe this was Jones's first children's novel, published in 1973. An earlier title for it was Wilkins' Tooth, which makes sense once you've read a bit of it, but probably wasn't as enticing to potential readers. While not as good as many of her later books, it does establish the theme she'd use frequently of normal people gradually discovering that the supernatural exists, leading to a mixture of the mystical and the mundane. The plot involves two kids setting up a revenge business, only to find it much more difficult than they had thought. Not only that, but they're seen as competition by the local witch. The first few instances of witchcraft can be seen as coincidence or suggestion, but it's slowly built up that Biddy Iremonger has actual powers, as well as a grudge against one of the families in town. The kids, who initially have their own feuds, have to team up to defeat her. One thing I found amusing was the local bully's slang, which used a lot of words that were foul-sounding but not at all actually vulgar, like "slimy" and "disemboweled."

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    When it was first published this book was called Wilkins' Tooth, which is a much more interesting title than the rather prosaic Witch's Business, though that title is also relevant to the plot. The book speeds along at a rate of knots, and has plenty of Wynne Jones' typical humour scattered throughout. At times the plot got almost a little convoluted, but maybe I read it too fast (!) The ending was certainly neat, based as it was on an old fairy tale, and the story became increasingly imaginativ When it was first published this book was called Wilkins' Tooth, which is a much more interesting title than the rather prosaic Witch's Business, though that title is also relevant to the plot. The book speeds along at a rate of knots, and has plenty of Wynne Jones' typical humour scattered throughout. At times the plot got almost a little convoluted, but maybe I read it too fast (!) The ending was certainly neat, based as it was on an old fairy tale, and the story became increasingly imaginative as more and more magic was piled on. I loved the way Wynne Jones overcame the problem of having the gang use swear words by writing those words as unpleasant words in odd combinations: you slimy-puke, disemboweled scum, pineapple-puking teeth, and so on. As far as I know she doesn't use this idea in any of her other books, certainly not in the ones I've read. Great fun.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Melissa McShane

    Diana Wynne Jones's first juvenile fantasy novel is in many ways her first novel, if you look at Changeover as a sort of extended writer's exercise. Changeover is good enough, but with Witch's Business we get to see DWJ apply everything she learned about characterization and style to a completely different audience and genre. What starts as a cynical money-making venture by Frank and Jess (get paid to get revenge for other people) ends up being much more serious when they encounter Biddy Iremong Diana Wynne Jones's first juvenile fantasy novel is in many ways her first novel, if you look at Changeover as a sort of extended writer's exercise. Changeover is good enough, but with Witch's Business we get to see DWJ apply everything she learned about characterization and style to a completely different audience and genre. What starts as a cynical money-making venture by Frank and Jess (get paid to get revenge for other people) ends up being much more serious when they encounter Biddy Iremonger, a real witch who's angry at them for poaching on her turf. It's a light story, never very substantial, but there are plenty of authors who don't do this well on their third or fourth books.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Adobe

    A simple story that still manages to loop back on itself in surprising ways. Two siblings start a revenge business, but they hadn't counted on two things: being contracted by their intended victims and competing with a vicious witch. The interactions between all the neighborhood children is fun, and local bully Buster uses hysterically harmless language ("vampire-stomach," "tomato-puke") as profanity. Unfortunately, the plot doesn't aspire to any great heights, and deux ex machina power the stor A simple story that still manages to loop back on itself in surprising ways. Two siblings start a revenge business, but they hadn't counted on two things: being contracted by their intended victims and competing with a vicious witch. The interactions between all the neighborhood children is fun, and local bully Buster uses hysterically harmless language ("vampire-stomach," "tomato-puke") as profanity. Unfortunately, the plot doesn't aspire to any great heights, and deux ex machina power the story. I think this was Jones' first published novel (as Wilkin's Tooth in 1973, according to my copy). That may explain a lot

  29. 4 out of 5

    Matt Bard

    I really enjoy Diana Wynne Jones style. The numerous side plots are always incredibly mysterious and fascinating in the most enjoyable way while the main story line tends to drag just ever so slightly (in an intentional manner). Nearing the book's conclusion, everything comes together at a frantic pace tying together all the threads into one humorous, interesting story. I just enjoy reading her material. It feels very unique in style and tone. That said, this wasn't her best work, but I'd certai I really enjoy Diana Wynne Jones style. The numerous side plots are always incredibly mysterious and fascinating in the most enjoyable way while the main story line tends to drag just ever so slightly (in an intentional manner). Nearing the book's conclusion, everything comes together at a frantic pace tying together all the threads into one humorous, interesting story. I just enjoy reading her material. It feels very unique in style and tone. That said, this wasn't her best work, but I'd certainly recommend it as a fun little read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    D.

    This is a bit of a curiosity. It's the first YA book by Diana Wynne Jones, who would go on to be one of the all-time greats, with fans like Neil Gaiman. This book certainly showcases her imagination, and almost ever page has a clever idea or a fun turn of phrase. Sadly, it's dated a bit, and it's filled with British-isms that non-Brits may find a bit off-putting. Still, it's a fun read, with a memorable cast of characters and a nice (but not preachy) message.

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