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Adventures in Cartooning: How to Turn Your Doodles Into Comics (Adventures in Cartooning)

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In this action-packed cartooning adventure, kids will have as much fun making comics as reading them!    Once upon a time . . . a princess tried to make a comic.  And with the help of a magical cartooning elf, she learned how – well enough to draw her way out of an encounter with a dangerous dragon, near-death by drowning, and into her very own adventure!  Like the prin In this action-packed cartooning adventure, kids will have as much fun making comics as reading them!    Once upon a time . . . a princess tried to make a comic.  And with the help of a magical cartooning elf, she learned how – well enough to draw her way out of an encounter with a dangerous dragon, near-death by drowning, and into her very own adventure!  Like the princess, young readers will discover that they already have the drawing and writing skills it takes to make a comic – they just need a little know-how.  And Adventures in Cartooning supplies just that.


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In this action-packed cartooning adventure, kids will have as much fun making comics as reading them!    Once upon a time . . . a princess tried to make a comic.  And with the help of a magical cartooning elf, she learned how – well enough to draw her way out of an encounter with a dangerous dragon, near-death by drowning, and into her very own adventure!  Like the prin In this action-packed cartooning adventure, kids will have as much fun making comics as reading them!    Once upon a time . . . a princess tried to make a comic.  And with the help of a magical cartooning elf, she learned how – well enough to draw her way out of an encounter with a dangerous dragon, near-death by drowning, and into her very own adventure!  Like the princess, young readers will discover that they already have the drawing and writing skills it takes to make a comic – they just need a little know-how.  And Adventures in Cartooning supplies just that.

30 review for Adventures in Cartooning: How to Turn Your Doodles Into Comics (Adventures in Cartooning)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    The whole point of this is that you don't have to be a great artist to make a comic. It is a great learning tool and tells an amusing little story to teach the basics of comics. While a person can certainly tell a story, I do expect good visual with graphic novels. I hated the art in this thing. I want more. This would be great for anyone interesting in comic writing. It would be a great resource.

  2. 4 out of 5

    L13_Natasha

    Looking for a way to introduce the world of graphic novels? The Adventures of Cartooning is the instruction manual to visual literacy. Carefully explaining vocabulary through words and images, all necessary words are covered: panels, gutters, tiers, stems, word balloons, and thought balloons. The authors (Strum, Arnold, & Fredrick-Frost) also explain how illustrators use strategies to demonstrate motion, volume, sound effects, size, and conversation. This informational text beings insight to Looking for a way to introduce the world of graphic novels? The Adventures of Cartooning is the instruction manual to visual literacy. Carefully explaining vocabulary through words and images, all necessary words are covered: panels, gutters, tiers, stems, word balloons, and thought balloons. The authors (Strum, Arnold, & Fredrick-Frost) also explain how illustrators use strategies to demonstrate motion, volume, sound effects, size, and conversation. This informational text beings insight to the complexity of graphic novels and the importance illustrations have in telling a story. A clever way to use the technique to teach the technique.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tanner

    What I thought of the book was great.I haven't read to many books in my life but I have read at least a few.This was my favorite book I have ever read because it fits my personality perfectly.Less words and more pictures because I find that I don't like to read as much as watching pictures in a book.Also it helps me understand the book better.I liked this book because it was very happy,I find that if I read a science fiction book it is a little bit sad or a little bit violent to me which is a li What I thought of the book was great.I haven't read to many books in my life but I have read at least a few.This was my favorite book I have ever read because it fits my personality perfectly.Less words and more pictures because I find that I don't like to read as much as watching pictures in a book.Also it helps me understand the book better.I liked this book because it was very happy,I find that if I read a science fiction book it is a little bit sad or a little bit violent to me which is a little bit sad.I picked up the book because I judge a book by its cover,and the glossy new cover with a lot of colours made me feel the need to sign out the book.I finished the book because it was short and it could make me keep my focus on reading it with love.The book is about pretty much just cartoons,and also they say they give you tips on how to turn doodles into comics.They do but they make into a mini story for more excitement out of the book.I recommend this book to my dad because he likes to watch a lot of movies so obviously he likes pictures more than words/text.And he is a visual learner so he understands the book the best that way because in the book there is probably 2 thirds of pictures and 1 third of words which is barely anything for a book or for a grade 7 to read or a dad to read.Say I take the maze runner for example,there's a book and a movie available to read or watch,me and my dad would watch the movie because we would understand the book better.So overall my rating of the book was 5/5.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tazendra

    I spotted this book here on Goodreads, and it looked fun, so I put it on my Want-To-Read list. A looonng time later (about now)....I decided to check it out from the library. Whoa! Awesome! Positive: Wow! Very creative! The Drawings: 4.5 stars. Not much to say. It looks like the drawings fit very well like pieces of a puzzle to me (even though the dragon's wings seemed a bit small for me). The drawings also helped inspire me. The Story: 5 stars. I really liked the creativity in the story. It was v I spotted this book here on Goodreads, and it looked fun, so I put it on my Want-To-Read list. A looonng time later (about now)....I decided to check it out from the library. Whoa! Awesome! Positive: Wow! Very creative! The Drawings: 4.5 stars. Not much to say. It looks like the drawings fit very well like pieces of a puzzle to me (even though the dragon's wings seemed a bit small for me). The drawings also helped inspire me. The Story: 5 stars. I really liked the creativity in the story. It was very entertaining. I loved the adventure The Characters: 5 stars. I like the knight's determination, the elf's personality and Edward. I think Edward is the coolest horse. Like the drawings it felt like the perfect pieces to a puzzle. The Learning: 5 stars. Although it doesn't show you how to draw, it shows you how to set up the comic, which I like. The whole point of the adventure in this story was to learn about how to make comics, and that feels entertaining, which I think the reader is supposed to feel. I recommend this book to kids littler than me who love to draw, and want to learn how to make comics. Or if you want to learn about comics and want to be entertained simultaneously, then this book is for you.

  5. 5 out of 5

    (NS) Heatherk

    This is a newly published (2009) graphic novel that is wonderful for early elementary students. The book caught my attention when one of my second graders checked the book our from our school library. The cover contains labels such as "motion lines", "word balloon", and "sound effect" that allow the reader to learn right away what they may see within the story. These labels are simply so the reader's level of comprehension can reach its potential. This creative story is about a brave knight who This is a newly published (2009) graphic novel that is wonderful for early elementary students. The book caught my attention when one of my second graders checked the book our from our school library. The cover contains labels such as "motion lines", "word balloon", and "sound effect" that allow the reader to learn right away what they may see within the story. These labels are simply so the reader's level of comprehension can reach its potential. This creative story is about a brave knight who brings giggles and laughs to the plot. The knight is determined to catch the dragon, who also chews bubble gum. Martians, Santa Claus, sea animals, princesses, and a small male fairy are also included. Further, the story refers to Jack in the Beanstalk and Humpty Dumpty explicitly. A must buy or read for a reader of any age!!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Raina

    Ubersimplified version of Making Comics. In fact, the story ends up overtaking the instructional elements, but I'm not sure that's a bad thing for the audience. Explains simple cartooning concepts. Elementary booktalk, perhaps. I just need to read more nonfic that isn't gn related. ;)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Adam Furman

    Great graphic novel for kids. It was recommended to me for pre-k, but I'd recommend it for 1st or 2nd grade. The goal is to encourage kids to draw, teach kids to read comics, and teach kids to create comics.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jamila

    Hilarious & informative. I will use this in a cartooning program.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Patty

    I can't wait to get this for my niece when she is a little older! A friend of mine did the cartoons for this book, and I am really proud of him!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    this is a fantastic cartooning book for kids. Its a hilarious adventure with a knight, a cowardly horse, a magical elf, a bubble gum chewing dragon, talking vegetables and a great surprise ending!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Grace Bittle

    Super cute!

  12. 5 out of 5

    May Regan

    Yep. I never realized how many books are my childhood! (I could never draw as well as the book authors)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    This is a terrific and funny book that will get kids writing their own cartoons!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Haha, every time I think about a princess in a knightly suit, I am reminded of this cute book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Betsy

    Too often a kid will walk into a library, ask for a book on drawing, and be taken to the requisite “How to Draw a [Blank:]” section on the shelves. These books are the usual standard fare. They all begin by saying you should draw a circle over another circle, etc. etc. Sometimes you’ll get something a little more high end like Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain and once in a while an old book on drawing comics will be stuck in between the books on the shelves, dilapidated and well worth repl Too often a kid will walk into a library, ask for a book on drawing, and be taken to the requisite “How to Draw a [Blank:]” section on the shelves. These books are the usual standard fare. They all begin by saying you should draw a circle over another circle, etc. etc. Sometimes you’ll get something a little more high end like Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain and once in a while an old book on drawing comics will be stuck in between the books on the shelves, dilapidated and well worth replacing with something new and fresh. So it is that I am mighty pleased to announce the following: something new and fresh. When three cartooning experts got together to teach kids about cartoons, the result became Adventures in Cartooning. Fun, funny, and strangely informative, you can just consider this as a kind of Understanding Comics” for the under twelve set. When a princess is determined to be missing from her tower, there’s only one place she could have gone. Clearly an evil dragon has kidnapped her. So it is that a brave knight and the brave knight’s not particularly brave horse Edward set forth to find the dragon and rescue the lady fair. Aiding them is a Magic Cartooning Elf who strikes up a deal with the knight. If the elf is allowed to tell the knight about making comics then he will also lead the rescue party to the dragon. The result is that the elf teaches the knight and the readers about elements like panels, the size of text, backgrounds, and the fact that a reader will only believe what a character tells them to believe. By the end the knight (who is revealed to be the princess in disguise) rescues a batch of enchanted knights from the dragon and even Edward helps to save the day in the end. What’s so great about this book is that it is directed towards those kids with limited skills. Don’t get me wrong... it’s also useful for those kids who are superb artists and need an introduction to the world of cartooning, but what I find so remarkable is that the book makes it clear that anyone can be a cartoonist. Child readers aren’t limited by their artistic skills but by their imaginations. So the lesson to be learned from this book is basically that if you’re willing to take the time to learn the basics, you too can make your own original cartoons. There’s even an example in the back that’s childish enough to make kids feel okay about making their own cartoons, but that also makes use of backgrounds, different sized panels, and a coherent little story. This isn’t to say that Sturm, Arnold, and Frederick-Frost don’t belie the seemingly simple format with some clever touches of their own. Pay close attention and you’ll see the panels moving downward to suit the story or zeroing in on specific details to set a scene. It’s a subtle mix of looking easy while being sophisticated. At the back of the book there are easy sections on “cartooning basics”. These pages cover panels, word/thought balloons, and the ways in which certain styles are recognized (in America anyway) as emotions or states of being. Edward is a particular good model for these moods since he is essentially expressionless. Without much in the way of a mouth, his emotions are conveyed through scribbles and lines around his body (or through his eyebrows, which appear periodically). Of course, it doesn’t spell everything out. For example, when Edward is feeling particularly frightened his legs will become wiggly lines. And that’s an unspoken symbol we all can understand, even if it isn’t translated at some point. If this book does well it might be worth hoping that the creators pursue it into other avenues. Adventures in Cartooning could lead to something like Adventures in Manga, for example. Though it may initially confuse kids (to say nothing of easily confused adults) with its mix of fiction and fact, Adventures in Cartooning has the ability to convince anyone reading it that making your own cartoons is not only fun but also achievable. A great addition to any collection, whether in a library or in a home. Ages 7 and up.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shel

    Sturm, J., Arnold, A., & Frederick-Frost, A. (2009). Adventures in Cartooning. New York: First Second 1596433698 109 Pages Appetizer: First Second, one of the leading publishers for graphic novels for children has come out with this guide for making cartoons. When a princess doesn't believe that she can draw well enough to make a cartoon, the Magic Cartooning Elf poofs onto the scene to prove that is not the case. The Magic Cartooning Elf accompanies a knight and his horse, Edward, to face a ca Sturm, J., Arnold, A., & Frederick-Frost, A. (2009). Adventures in Cartooning. New York: First Second 1596433698 109 Pages Appetizer: First Second, one of the leading publishers for graphic novels for children has come out with this guide for making cartoons. When a princess doesn't believe that she can draw well enough to make a cartoon, the Magic Cartooning Elf poofs onto the scene to prove that is not the case. The Magic Cartooning Elf accompanies a knight and his horse, Edward, to face a candy-loving dragon that has defeated other knights (by turning them in to vegetables! How fun is that?!) This was a fast and fun read. There's a nice balance between the information and the humorous fantasy story. While I still have NO art skills, this story made me want to break out the pencil and paper and try to create a comic of my own. If only I had the time to do that...Do you think my committee will be open to a dissertation that shares the adventures of the mythic stick man? Probably not. But I'm willing to give it a go. *Spoiler* I especially love when the knight reveals her identity to be the princess from the beginning of the story. Not only does this challenge gender stereotypes, but it also demonstrates the fact that readers/writers/illustrators like to see themselves in the literature they enjoy. Dinner Conversation: "Once upon a time...a princess tried to make a comic..." Magic Elf: "If you let me tell you about comics and cartooning, I'll help you find the dragon..." (p. 13). Magic Elf: "In comics, words are as important as pictures! No one but you saw the drawing on the map, so how do we know it was there?" Knight: "Because I told you so?" Magic Elf: "Right!" (p. 35). Knight: "I made it up! I bet my words created a picture inside your head, Edward! A picture of a giant donut!! Ha ha!" (p. 36). Carrot: "There is only one way to reverse the curse!!!" Onion: "We need to be watered!" Carrot: "With the tears of the dragon!" (pp. 68-69). Magic Elf: "I guess she wanted to be a part of the adventure and not just be shown how to do it!" (p. 97). To Go with the Meal: The obvious lesson is to use this book to discuss cartooning and creating illustrations. The book goes into the proper terms for cartoons and graphic novels, including panels, word and thought bubbles, etc. The story also goes into the proper positioning of word balloons as well as shows how to show emotions like frustration, excitement, tiredness, surprise and movement. While this helps readers to understand how to incorporate these into their own illustrations, the lessons on these subjects also allows readers to understand and read cartoons and graphic novels more easily. Since the princess *slight spoiler* draws herself into the story she decides to create, students can do that as well. They can adapt a cartoon, picturebook or comic they're familiar with and position themselves as the protagonist. (Wouldn't it be fun if Batman took off his mask and your face was underneath?) Tasty Rating: !!!!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

    This is an informational book about how to make your own cartoons that is written in a graphic novel format, and incorporates the information along with a fantasy story of a knight looking to slay a dragon with his fairy guide and his trusty horse Edward, and a princess who ends up rescuing the knight. This book was pretty much amazing. It manages to seamlessly flow back and forth between the story and teaching the reader about structural and artistic elements of making comics. The informational This is an informational book about how to make your own cartoons that is written in a graphic novel format, and incorporates the information along with a fantasy story of a knight looking to slay a dragon with his fairy guide and his trusty horse Edward, and a princess who ends up rescuing the knight. This book was pretty much amazing. It manages to seamlessly flow back and forth between the story and teaching the reader about structural and artistic elements of making comics. The informational part present elements of cartooning, such as using panels, showing movement, using speech and thought bubbles, and more. The book also covers how to draw basic figures and items and how those simple drawings can be enough to convey your message. The fantasy part of the story follow the knight on his quest to slay the dragon with the help of his fairy and spunky horse Edward. The fairy uses the journey to the dragon to teach the knight about how to write comics. The dragon ends up capturing them, and they eventually saved when the princess uses the smell of frying onions to get the knight back. The book is funny as well, including some requisite potty humor and a horse who imagines an ice cream cone instead of a tool to save everyone. The illustrations are simple drawings that appear to either be marker or computer-drawn. The illustrations and the use of comic elements is appropriate to the purpose of the book, which is to teach children how to make their own comics. Even the about the author page is written in comic form. This book could draw in students of a wide range of ages, probably from 1st grade through the end of middle school. Boys and reluctant readers would be drawn in by this book, but all types of readers would enjoy it. The princess is a strong female character who is seen as smart and strong. The only potential controversy would be the potty humor, but it by no means dominates the book or would make me keep it out of the hands of students of any age. As well as teaching children how to draw their own comics, this book could definitely help children navigate reading a graphic novel format. Some students may not be aware of the meaning that is attempting to be conveyed through things like different shaped speech bubbles, or the size of the frame and white space on the page. This book could be read as a precursor to reading other graphic novels such as Bone or American Born Chinese. Along with reading other graphic novels, you might have students present their own information in this format, whether a piece of fiction, or even an informational text.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shelley

    Summary: Want to know how comics work? Join the Knight and his horse, Edward on a journey to defeat a dragon, and luckily, the Magic Cartooning elf fairy is here to help the knight along his journey! Along the way the knight runs through panels, through many scenes, and even runs into a wall as an obstacle. The elf fairy begins to explain how comics work but leaves when he gets fed up with the Knight who doesn't always seem to listen to him, so the elf disappears and the knight has to figure out Summary: Want to know how comics work? Join the Knight and his horse, Edward on a journey to defeat a dragon, and luckily, the Magic Cartooning elf fairy is here to help the knight along his journey! Along the way the knight runs through panels, through many scenes, and even runs into a wall as an obstacle. The elf fairy begins to explain how comics work but leaves when he gets fed up with the Knight who doesn't always seem to listen to him, so the elf disappears and the knight has to figure out how comics work in on his own, in order to continue his journey and find the dragon. A Wonderful Introduction into Cartoons and Cartooning I found this graphic novel very light-hearted and fun to read. It is a wonderful introduction into cartooning and cartooning terminology for young children. Unfortunately... As a middle school librarian and as an advanced comic and graphic novel reader, I originally thought this book would read more as a "how-to" tutorial to comic book writing, similar to Scott McCloud's "Understanding Comics", but for a younger audience. Instead this book felt more like a story with a few points about comics rather than direct instruction on comic book terminology and comic book know-how. The book does explain panels, and word bubbles fairly well and even shows the steps to drawing the characters, but it neglects to mention styles of cartooning, using realistic vs. cartoon style, the passage of time between gutters, and it does not talk about panel transitions very much in detail. With all that being said, because the book does not go into detail about cartooning and graphic novels, I think this would be a great read for elementary school students 2nd - 4th grade to introduce kids to comics and graphic novels. I would not recommend this to middle school students wanting to learn to cartooning, but if they just wanted to read the story in it then I think that would be fine. Again, this would be best geared towards an elementary reading level audience.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ollie

    Comics –especially indie comics– can be an incredible source of inspiration, strength, and creativity. This is something mainstream superhero comics only do half-heartedly: they're more interested in rehashed storylines, cheap stunts, and artwork resembling contortionists athletes. Their storylines are more focused on unrealistic and fantastic battles between good and evil. On the other hand, indie comics make up for that, with completely creator driven stories that are focused on personal growt Comics –especially indie comics– can be an incredible source of inspiration, strength, and creativity. This is something mainstream superhero comics only do half-heartedly: they're more interested in rehashed storylines, cheap stunts, and artwork resembling contortionists athletes. Their storylines are more focused on unrealistic and fantastic battles between good and evil. On the other hand, indie comics make up for that, with completely creator driven stories that are focused on personal growth, or struggles we can all relate to or learn from. With indie comics, the desire to become involved in the creative process seems less like an unreachable dream. Walls are broken down and human beings are empowered. But it's one thing to become inspired, and it's another to take the next step: putting pen to paper. Luckily for kids, there's Adventures in Cartooning: How to Turn Your Doodles Into Comics. Using very simple yet clean artwork, this instructional guide is charmingly told through a knight's perspective who by learning the ins and outs of comic book storytelling moves his story along. Through his adventure, we learn about the proper use of panels (and how to think outside the box when using them), how to organize them to make them easier to follow, where to place text, and some very useful tricks for how to play with speech variations and sizes and perspective. As someone who has been drawing a webcomic for two years, I myself found plenty to learn from this book (especially when it comes to comics jargon). In short, there's something here for everyone. The perfect gift for that young creative person in your life. Get them into this stuff early enough, and watch the magic happen.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    Wow! GREAT book. The front cover fooled me at first, but it really is a graphic novel. The bonus is that it's also a cartooning how-to book. Very positive and encouraging for young readers to use their own great ideas to draw cartoons and write stories. The story is funny and has all the basic elements of a classic adveture quest. A fairy hangs around in the beginning and at the end to introduce readers to some of the techinal aspects of cartoons, but it in now way detracts from the story; it ad Wow! GREAT book. The front cover fooled me at first, but it really is a graphic novel. The bonus is that it's also a cartooning how-to book. Very positive and encouraging for young readers to use their own great ideas to draw cartoons and write stories. The story is funny and has all the basic elements of a classic adveture quest. A fairy hangs around in the beginning and at the end to introduce readers to some of the techinal aspects of cartoons, but it in now way detracts from the story; it adds to it. The side information about what different devices such as panels and word balloons do in cartoons helps the reader understand how complex reading comics actually is and makes a case for all of the reading skills people build when they devour a comic book. I highly recommend this book to middle grade boys and girls and also to their parents and teachers, even if just so they can join me in awe that these authors/artists managed to perfectly blend art with a science.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin W.

    Have you ever wanted to draw your own cartoon, but you were unsure of where to start and what some of the comic book conventions are? This book, a comic book itself, is a great guide for starting off making your own comics. It follows the adventures of a knight and his fat horse as they journey to find a bubble-gum-chewing dragon. Along the way, they are aided by a magical elf who knows all the rules to making comic books, and the examples they use to teach are wonderfully played out so that the Have you ever wanted to draw your own cartoon, but you were unsure of where to start and what some of the comic book conventions are? This book, a comic book itself, is a great guide for starting off making your own comics. It follows the adventures of a knight and his fat horse as they journey to find a bubble-gum-chewing dragon. Along the way, they are aided by a magical elf who knows all the rules to making comic books, and the examples they use to teach are wonderfully played out so that the readers know exactly what they're talking about. The art style is simple, appealing, and easy to imitate, with lines for limbs and dots for eyes. In the back of the book, is an Ed-Emberly-inspired step by step guide to drawing the characters, and several examples of comics that children made. This book would be a great guide for children looking for a project to do or who love comic books and want to create their own. Highly recommended for grades 1-5.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    Adventures in Cartooning is an exciting and hilarious adventure story that is told with cartoons in a comic book style “graphic novel” form. It is about a missing princess and a brave knight who is determined to slay the deadly dragon that must have stolen her (you won’t believe where the princess turns up in the end). The eager knight’s quest is joined by a magic elf—the only problem is that the magic elf is more interested in teaching the knight (and you) all about comics than in helping defea Adventures in Cartooning is an exciting and hilarious adventure story that is told with cartoons in a comic book style “graphic novel” form. It is about a missing princess and a brave knight who is determined to slay the deadly dragon that must have stolen her (you won’t believe where the princess turns up in the end). The eager knight’s quest is joined by a magic elf—the only problem is that the magic elf is more interested in teaching the knight (and you) all about comics than in helping defeat the dragon! That’s right—while you’re enjoying the adventure, you get to learn all about how comics work—and how you can make your own! This book is great for long-time graphic novel fans who are ready to create their own epic adventures but it’s also great for kids who have never even read a graphic novel before and who are just looking for a fun summer read!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Sammis

    Adventures in Cartooning: How to Turn Your Doodles into Comics by James Sturm was short listed for the middle grades graphic novels category for the 2009-2010 Cybils. There were a lot of excellent books on that short list and I think in a different year this book could have won. The book uses the medium to teach the methods behind the medium. The focus is on the method of building a good story, not on drawing in a certain style. In fact the illustrations are done with stick figures and doodles ve Adventures in Cartooning: How to Turn Your Doodles into Comics by James Sturm was short listed for the middle grades graphic novels category for the 2009-2010 Cybils. There were a lot of excellent books on that short list and I think in a different year this book could have won. The book uses the medium to teach the methods behind the medium. The focus is on the method of building a good story, not on drawing in a certain style. In fact the illustrations are done with stick figures and doodles very much like Order of the Stick or similar web comics (in terms of style, not content). The book though isn't strictly a how-to. It's also a graphic novel in that the stick figure knight has a quest and a story apart from the lesson plan. Best of all, there's an excellent twist at the end of book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    J.V. Seem

    Spending the day in bed, having sent the BF off to rehearsal by himself. I'm exhausted, physically and mentally after an anxiety attack yesterday, and quite sick, so I figured under the covers was the best place for me. No energy to perform. I told BF to report that I was reading Stanislavski, but I ended up with Adentures in Cartooning. This is a comic book - on how to draw comics. It's meant for kids, and the book does contain a story, an action-filled story of a knight and her horse, which clev Spending the day in bed, having sent the BF off to rehearsal by himself. I'm exhausted, physically and mentally after an anxiety attack yesterday, and quite sick, so I figured under the covers was the best place for me. No energy to perform. I told BF to report that I was reading Stanislavski, but I ended up with Adentures in Cartooning. This is a comic book - on how to draw comics. It's meant for kids, and the book does contain a story, an action-filled story of a knight and her horse, which cleverly manages to teach kids the fundamentals of comic drawing, without being dull. It uses great examples and shows a great variety of methods. It also focuses on simplicity in drawing, which I'm a great fan of, being a Schulz fan. It's a colorful, fun book with great instructions and drawings, quite inspirational. And I learned something.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    This distinctive informational picture book by the founder of the Center for Cartoon Studies introduces the basics of cartooning in the context of a very funny sequential story. Aided by a magical elf who introduces such comic essentials as thought balloons and font size, this original paperback chronicles the quest of an impatient knight and his long-suffering horse as they seek to rescue a princess—who saves them instead—from a candy-loving dragon. During this action-packed sojourn, panels wit This distinctive informational picture book by the founder of the Center for Cartoon Studies introduces the basics of cartooning in the context of a very funny sequential story. Aided by a magical elf who introduces such comic essentials as thought balloons and font size, this original paperback chronicles the quest of an impatient knight and his long-suffering horse as they seek to rescue a princess—who saves them instead—from a candy-loving dragon. During this action-packed sojourn, panels with simple shapes and lines are manipulated to emphasize such literary and visual elements as setting and plot and movement and perspective. A nimble introduction to cartooning that can be used with children throughout elementary school.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kaycee

    This is a book that performs double duty. Not only is it a comic book that tells the story of a knight on a quest to defeat a dragon, but it also operates as a how-to guide for making comic books. This book goes through the different feature in a comic book and describes and explains them. Adventures In Cartooning does this in a way that is fun and interesting for students. This isn't just a dry book explaining what panels are and what the different thought bubbles mean. It has its own story to This is a book that performs double duty. Not only is it a comic book that tells the story of a knight on a quest to defeat a dragon, but it also operates as a how-to guide for making comic books. This book goes through the different feature in a comic book and describes and explains them. Adventures In Cartooning does this in a way that is fun and interesting for students. This isn't just a dry book explaining what panels are and what the different thought bubbles mean. It has its own story to tell and it is fun and humorous. This would be a great book for students to use in a story making or in learning the different elements needed to tell a story. This book would be appropriate for students in grades 2-4.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    11/12: The entire family loved this one! It's a cute story, but it's also a lesson in cartooning, Ed Emberly-style. Amazon Book Description: In this action-packed cartooning adventure, kids will have as much fun making comics as reading them! Once upon a time . . . a princess tried to make a comic. And with the help of a magical cartooning elf, she learned how – well enough to draw her way out of an encounter with a dangerous dragon, near-death by drowning, and into her very own adventure! Like the 11/12: The entire family loved this one! It's a cute story, but it's also a lesson in cartooning, Ed Emberly-style. Amazon Book Description: In this action-packed cartooning adventure, kids will have as much fun making comics as reading them! Once upon a time . . . a princess tried to make a comic. And with the help of a magical cartooning elf, she learned how – well enough to draw her way out of an encounter with a dangerous dragon, near-death by drowning, and into her very own adventure! Like the princess, young readers will discover that they already have the drawing and writing skills it takes to make a comic – they just need a little know-how. And Adventures in Cartooning supplies just that.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Mansfield

    A delightful book that tells a story of a knight who wants to fight a dragon, so off he goes on his adventure but along the way a Magic Elf accompanies him and teaches him the art of cartooning. Illustrations are drawn in Ed Emberley style and Ed is given a nod for his inspiration at the back where instructions on how to draw the knight, elf and horse are given. Throughout the book cartooning lingo is introduced and the aspects that make up a comic: panels, bubbles, sound effects, etc. All withi A delightful book that tells a story of a knight who wants to fight a dragon, so off he goes on his adventure but along the way a Magic Elf accompanies him and teaches him the art of cartooning. Illustrations are drawn in Ed Emberley style and Ed is given a nod for his inspiration at the back where instructions on how to draw the knight, elf and horse are given. Throughout the book cartooning lingo is introduced and the aspects that make up a comic: panels, bubbles, sound effects, etc. All within the confines of a delightful, humourous story. A very unique book which will bring out the cartoonist in any aspiring artist who may feel overwhelmed at getting started. An actual child's example is shown at the back of the book. Highly recommended.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kara Hartz

    This book is adorable. I found myself almost reading the whole thing in the bookstore while deciding weather or not to get it for my daughter. I'm glad I did. She hasn't put it down, and drew her first little comic strip today. This book isn't about teaching the art of how to draw. It's about the mechanics of making a comic and using that medium for story-telling. It does this by telling it's own story about a knight hunting a dragon with an elf tagging along that points out how the comic mechani This book is adorable. I found myself almost reading the whole thing in the bookstore while deciding weather or not to get it for my daughter. I'm glad I did. She hasn't put it down, and drew her first little comic strip today. This book isn't about teaching the art of how to draw. It's about the mechanics of making a comic and using that medium for story-telling. It does this by telling it's own story about a knight hunting a dragon with an elf tagging along that points out how the comic mechanics work. Even if you don't want to draw your own comic, it's a very cute story to read. The artwork is so simple, kids won't be intimidated to try something on their own.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Boni

    FUN intro to comics and cartooning. I would have liked a little more direct instruction in it, but I think the balance they did go with will make it more accessible to a wider audience of younger kids. Less intimidating. And you still indirectly absorb a lot about storytelling and drawing by just reading and enjoying it. In any case, I would give this to any kid with a penchant for art, doodling, or writing, or who likes comics or graphic novels, or who has an active imagination, or who doesn't FUN intro to comics and cartooning. I would have liked a little more direct instruction in it, but I think the balance they did go with will make it more accessible to a wider audience of younger kids. Less intimidating. And you still indirectly absorb a lot about storytelling and drawing by just reading and enjoying it. In any case, I would give this to any kid with a penchant for art, doodling, or writing, or who likes comics or graphic novels, or who has an active imagination, or who doesn't think they HAVE much imagination- to prove that they do :) Basically, I'd give this to anyone! Great book. And I'm buying it for myself- there's a LOT to be learned here...

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