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Not your grandma’s jam book, Blue Chair Fruit: Jam, Jelly & Marmalade is the definitive jam book of the 21st century approaching the nostalgic preserving kitchen with a modern sustainable eye. Author Rachel Saunders is the owner of the Bay Area’s artisanal jam producer, Blue Chair Fruit. Rachel Saunders's The Blue Chair Jam Cookbook is the definitive jam and marmalade c Not your grandma’s jam book, Blue Chair Fruit: Jam, Jelly & Marmalade is the definitive jam book of the 21st century approaching the nostalgic preserving kitchen with a modern sustainable eye. Author Rachel Saunders is the owner of the Bay Area’s artisanal jam producer, Blue Chair Fruit. Rachel Saunders's The Blue Chair Jam Cookbook is the definitive jam and marmalade cookbook of the 21st century. In addition to offering more than 100 original jam, jelly, and marmalade recipes, master jam artisan Rachel Saunders shares all of her technical preserving knowledge, as well as her unique jam maker's perspective on fruit. Rachel combines nostalgia with a modern, sustainable approach to creating fresh and vividly flavored preserves. The recipes are divided into chapters based on the seasons, and each chapter is organized by month and type of fruit. Sample recipes include Strawberry-Marsala Jam with Rosemary, Italian Lemon Marmalade, and Early Girl Tomato Jam. More than 100 stunning photographs by Sara Remington illustrate each part of the preserving process--from the different stages of cooking to testing for doneness to the final canning stage. Each recipe includes an approximate yield and a suggested shelf life, in addition to details on recommended equipment, including Rachel's beloved copper jam pot. The Blue Chair Jam Cookbook gives all measurements by weight rather than volume, making it the most exact and reliable American jam book on the market. More than 20 recipe variations are provided, along with detailed information about common and rare fruits, hybrid varieties, and flavor combinations. Nothing is left to chance or overlooked; Rachel explains every aspect of jam and marmalade making in step-by-step detail. The Blue Chair Jam Cookbook is a one-of-a-kind, must-have resource for home and professional cooks alike.


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Not your grandma’s jam book, Blue Chair Fruit: Jam, Jelly & Marmalade is the definitive jam book of the 21st century approaching the nostalgic preserving kitchen with a modern sustainable eye. Author Rachel Saunders is the owner of the Bay Area’s artisanal jam producer, Blue Chair Fruit. Rachel Saunders's The Blue Chair Jam Cookbook is the definitive jam and marmalade c Not your grandma’s jam book, Blue Chair Fruit: Jam, Jelly & Marmalade is the definitive jam book of the 21st century approaching the nostalgic preserving kitchen with a modern sustainable eye. Author Rachel Saunders is the owner of the Bay Area’s artisanal jam producer, Blue Chair Fruit. Rachel Saunders's The Blue Chair Jam Cookbook is the definitive jam and marmalade cookbook of the 21st century. In addition to offering more than 100 original jam, jelly, and marmalade recipes, master jam artisan Rachel Saunders shares all of her technical preserving knowledge, as well as her unique jam maker's perspective on fruit. Rachel combines nostalgia with a modern, sustainable approach to creating fresh and vividly flavored preserves. The recipes are divided into chapters based on the seasons, and each chapter is organized by month and type of fruit. Sample recipes include Strawberry-Marsala Jam with Rosemary, Italian Lemon Marmalade, and Early Girl Tomato Jam. More than 100 stunning photographs by Sara Remington illustrate each part of the preserving process--from the different stages of cooking to testing for doneness to the final canning stage. Each recipe includes an approximate yield and a suggested shelf life, in addition to details on recommended equipment, including Rachel's beloved copper jam pot. The Blue Chair Jam Cookbook gives all measurements by weight rather than volume, making it the most exact and reliable American jam book on the market. More than 20 recipe variations are provided, along with detailed information about common and rare fruits, hybrid varieties, and flavor combinations. Nothing is left to chance or overlooked; Rachel explains every aspect of jam and marmalade making in step-by-step detail. The Blue Chair Jam Cookbook is a one-of-a-kind, must-have resource for home and professional cooks alike.

30 review for The Blue Chair Jam Cookbook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    As an experienced jam-maker, I came to this book expecting a variety of innovative recipes; combinations I hadn't seen yet, flavorings I hadn't thought of. But in fact this reads somewhat like a textbook: 'here are the instructions, in great technical detail, for how to make THE perfect such-and-such jam.' I realize that this is probably what a lot of people are looking for, but I had different hopes. Another theme that rubbed me the wrong way is her tendency to use all sorts of fresh fruit varie As an experienced jam-maker, I came to this book expecting a variety of innovative recipes; combinations I hadn't seen yet, flavorings I hadn't thought of. But in fact this reads somewhat like a textbook: 'here are the instructions, in great technical detail, for how to make THE perfect such-and-such jam.' I realize that this is probably what a lot of people are looking for, but I had different hopes. Another theme that rubbed me the wrong way is her tendency to use all sorts of fresh fruit varieties that are probably only available in California, where she is based, and at that, probably only available at farmers markets or farm-direct (inaccessible or cost-prohibitive to a great many people). The majority of the readership for this book will be lucky to find ONE variety of fresh fig, let alone three. Overall this book didn't resonate with me at all, and I felt it occupied a strange no-man's-land between cookbooks written by well-reputed chefs and those written with an entirely different intention by the DIY home-making culture.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Meghan

    This book makes me wish for all the seasons to be happening simultaneously.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Germaine

    I used to make marmalades and jams on a fairly regular basis but had gotten out of practice. I bought this book because it has a lot of basic information that I had never seen all in one place. In that respect, the book is very good. There are tons of recipes and beautiful photographs of fruit, kitchens, and jars of preserves, and I could almost say that this is a case of culinary over-kill. The author can't just give us a recipe for orange marmalade, she gives us at least four -- all of which g I used to make marmalades and jams on a fairly regular basis but had gotten out of practice. I bought this book because it has a lot of basic information that I had never seen all in one place. In that respect, the book is very good. There are tons of recipes and beautiful photographs of fruit, kitchens, and jars of preserves, and I could almost say that this is a case of culinary over-kill. The author can't just give us a recipe for orange marmalade, she gives us at least four -- all of which gild the lily. They aren't just recipes for classic Seville orange marmalade -- they have to be gussied up with extras. Seville Orange Marmalade with Rum, Vanilla & Piloncillo is an example. I did make this recipe and it was good, but if I hadn't known that I put the rum, vanilla, and piloncillo (Mexican brown sugar) in the marmalade, I would never have known they were there. A few gratings of piloncillo and an ounce and a half of rum in a batch of marmalade yielding five quarts of preserve aren't noticeable, but heck, "Seville Orange Marmalade with Rum, Vanilla & Piloncillo" looks really great on the label. The great majority of the recipes in this book fall into the same category -- jams, jellies, and marmalade with a lot of extras thrown in. This book is priced at $35.00. I would strongly suggest that if you want it, you buy it through Amazon or find a used copy. It just isn't worth $35.00.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    Update - summer 2011: I've cooked through more of the non-marmalade recipes (mostly berry jams), and I haven't had any of them fail to set, although I generally need to cook longer than she lists. I think part of the marmalade problem was vague descriptions of how much water to use. Instructions along the lines of "fill pot with enough water for the fruit to bob gently" are not as useful as "add 4 cups of water." And finally, I'd recommend getting a candy thermometer & referencing other cann Update - summer 2011: I've cooked through more of the non-marmalade recipes (mostly berry jams), and I haven't had any of them fail to set, although I generally need to cook longer than she lists. I think part of the marmalade problem was vague descriptions of how much water to use. Instructions along the lines of "fill pot with enough water for the fruit to bob gently" are not as useful as "add 4 cups of water." And finally, I'd recommend getting a candy thermometer & referencing other canning info and using *that* to judge done-ness, rather than the many methods she describes. Also, the blackberry lemon basil jam is particularly amazing! Winter 2010: This book is gorgeous, and I love the photos that illustrate the different phases of cooking jams and marmalades. It's been a great intro thus far, since I've only made jam a handful of times in the past. My dilemma: each batch of marmalade took at least three times longer to cook on the stove (final step) than the recipe indicated. For example, the final step of cooking the marmalades is listed "25-30 minutes or more" with variance between batches of fruit, but I've had to cook them for upwards of 2 hours to get them to set. I'm following the instructions exactly, so I'm not quite sure where my error is taking place - my execution, the recipe, my equipment, etc, or is that amount of variance normal? My marmalades set eventually and they are yummy, but I'm new to marmalade and I'm unsure if they are supposed to taste so caramelized-sugar-like, or if that had to do with the extremely long cooking time. I'll keep working my way through more of the recipes!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Debra

    Last winter, my best friend and my Godchildren gave me a tremendously exciting gift, Rachel Saunder’s The Blue Chair Jam Cookbook. I had seen Rachel’s story on "FoodCrafters" a couple of years ago and I was intrigued. It was just a great twist of fate that I received that cookbook. I get bored with the same old-same old so I loved all of Rachel’s fresh twists on preserves. I was just as excited to receive permission from Kate at Blue Chair Jam Fruit Co. to share a few of Rachel’s recipes from her Last winter, my best friend and my Godchildren gave me a tremendously exciting gift, Rachel Saunder’s The Blue Chair Jam Cookbook. I had seen Rachel’s story on "FoodCrafters" a couple of years ago and I was intrigued. It was just a great twist of fate that I received that cookbook. I get bored with the same old-same old so I loved all of Rachel’s fresh twists on preserves. I was just as excited to receive permission from Kate at Blue Chair Jam Fruit Co. to share a few of Rachel’s recipes from her cookbook. The first recipe I tried was her “Early Summer Peach Marmalade” with the peaches from our Redhaven peach tree that pleasantly surprised us with five pounds of peaches this year. This recipe was so delicious, I needed more! When we came home with almost a bushel of stone fruit from a local orchard, I decided to use this recipe again and make both White County peach marmalade and Glohaven peach Marmalade. I have made many of her recipes with great success including Brandied Cherry Conserve, Blackberry Jam with Lemon Basil, Blueberry Jam, Concord Grape Jam, and Red Nectarine and Candied Ginger Jam.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bonmot

    I started canning in earnest last summer and turned to this book after some long time canners listed it as one of their go-to books. From the get-go, I was in love with this book in that food porn way - the gorgeous photography, the stories or notes that accompany each preserve, the recipes for simple tried and true jams as well as jams with more esoteric ingredients and more complex flavor profiles. However, it was only after making some of these jams and enjoying them heartily over the past ye I started canning in earnest last summer and turned to this book after some long time canners listed it as one of their go-to books. From the get-go, I was in love with this book in that food porn way - the gorgeous photography, the stories or notes that accompany each preserve, the recipes for simple tried and true jams as well as jams with more esoteric ingredients and more complex flavor profiles. However, it was only after making some of these jams and enjoying them heartily over the past year that I have decided to finally commit to buying the cookbook in anticipation of the canning season to come. Last year I made the strawberry balsamic black pepper jam, the red nectarine jam, and the pear-elderflower jam from the book. I made the red nectarine jam with Hamada Farm's red nectarines and the pear-elderflower with bartletts from K&J Farms, both at the San Francisco Ferry Building Farmers Market. Living in the Bay Area and having access to some of the best fruit in the world makes jam an easy thing to labor over. The results are precious, swoon-worthy, and wholly delightful in their decadence and their difference.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    Just got this cookbook yesterday. I had been eyeing it off for about a week at remaindered bookshop about 200 metres from my work. The recipes look gorgeous. They are mostly a little bit off center. Some recipes have ingredients I have never heard of and others have interesting flavour combinations. Have you ever thought to put sprigs of rosemary in jam? If you are like me you sort of half remember your Mum or your Grandma making jams but you lack a bit of confidence. This book is good in that r Just got this cookbook yesterday. I had been eyeing it off for about a week at remaindered bookshop about 200 metres from my work. The recipes look gorgeous. They are mostly a little bit off center. Some recipes have ingredients I have never heard of and others have interesting flavour combinations. Have you ever thought to put sprigs of rosemary in jam? If you are like me you sort of half remember your Mum or your Grandma making jams but you lack a bit of confidence. This book is good in that regard as it goes through a lot of basic jam theory. I have not seen any other comprehensive modern jam cookbook out there and I have been looking for a while. Great pictures but the woman who wrote it is cute in a skinny winsome way but there an awful lot of pictures of her walking through fields, picking rhubarb etc. Maybe its me but I find that a bit annoying. Maybe I wouldn't if she was Nigela! With cookbooks I suppose it is not the reading but how successful the recipes are that counts. I might try a rhubarb jam this weekend.

  8. 4 out of 5

    konami

    If you love making jam then this is the book for you! So far my friends and I made great tomato marmalade from my own homegrown tomatoes last year, and apricot marmalade. This year I ventured and made late summer peach marmalade without pectin and the results were superb. It takes 2 days to make the marmalade, but well work the wait. I've usually been making freezer jams because I love to preserve the taste of the fresh fruit, but since discovering the book through friends in Florida, I haven't If you love making jam then this is the book for you! So far my friends and I made great tomato marmalade from my own homegrown tomatoes last year, and apricot marmalade. This year I ventured and made late summer peach marmalade without pectin and the results were superb. It takes 2 days to make the marmalade, but well work the wait. I've usually been making freezer jams because I love to preserve the taste of the fresh fruit, but since discovering the book through friends in Florida, I haven't made freezer jam since! The book includes marmalade/jam made with herbs- something I would never had thought of, and just for a trial I did make peach - lavender marmalade. Again the end product was scrumptious. My garden tomatoes were just picked today, so it looks like my weekend is going to be busy making more tomato marmalade which we use on fish, chicken, and turkey. I'll comb through the book to see if there are more marmalade I want to conquer!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    OMG!! This is the preserve book everyone has been waiting for. I have been eyeing this book on Amazon for months. Haven't been able to find it for previewing at my local B+N. But decided to take the plunge last week and purchase even though it wasn't on sale. Far, far, far exceeded my expectations. Can't wait until this spring and summer and the produce in ripe and ready for canning. *Note - this is not an introduction to canning. You will still need additional materials if you haven't canned bef OMG!! This is the preserve book everyone has been waiting for. I have been eyeing this book on Amazon for months. Haven't been able to find it for previewing at my local B+N. But decided to take the plunge last week and purchase even though it wasn't on sale. Far, far, far exceeded my expectations. Can't wait until this spring and summer and the produce in ripe and ready for canning. *Note - this is not an introduction to canning. You will still need additional materials if you haven't canned before - for safety reasons. But it is worth adding to you cookbook collection. YUM!!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Teka Cochonneau

    My absolute, hands down favorite source for jam.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    As an inexperienced jam maker, I learned the key differences and techniques of jam, jellies, and marmalades here, as well as the foundation for experimentation with fruits and herbs. Clear, well sorted, and inspiring.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Linda K. Peter

    Very detailed and not a novice cookbook. Great ideas and combinations of flavors if you are more advanced in your jam life!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Irene Marston

    thank you waiting for fresh berries to try it out nice book

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bree

    Amazing recipes and I love that it's broken up by season. The recipes are easy to follow and the pictures are incredible.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gail Cooke

    Who can resist the honeyed taste of jam? Certainly not one of Lewis Carroll's characters who laments, “The rule is, jam to-morrow and jam yesterday – but never jam today.” Not to worry with the wonderfully comprehensive guide, THE BLUE CHAIR JAM COOKBOOK, we can have jam every day in an apparent endless variety of that sweet spread. Whether your preference is for a plain lemon marmalade or strawberry jam you'll find variations of these and so much more in this 364 page tribute to preserves. Fou Who can resist the honeyed taste of jam? Certainly not one of Lewis Carroll's characters who laments, “The rule is, jam to-morrow and jam yesterday – but never jam today.” Not to worry with the wonderfully comprehensive guide, THE BLUE CHAIR JAM COOKBOOK, we can have jam every day in an apparent endless variety of that sweet spread. Whether your preference is for a plain lemon marmalade or strawberry jam you'll find variations of these and so much more in this 364 page tribute to preserves. Founder of the Bay Area jam company Blue Chair Fruit Rachel Saunders has a passion for fruit which is evidenced in every recipe and mouth-watering illustration in this remarkable collection. She presents a loving, detailed discussions of various fruits, a technical section and, of course, her incomparable original recipes organized around the seasons of the year. Okay, I admit it – initially I was intimidated by the thought of making jam. But soon happy memories of my grandmother's kitchen filled my mind, and I could see her stove covered with kettles and glistening jars of jams covering the kitchen counter. This is one of those “If I can do it, anyone can” comments: For me, the directions found with the recipes are step-by-step clear and precise. As in the recipe for Early Summer Peach Jam with Green Almonds, which begins with Day 1 and the preparation of the peaches. (To be placed in sugar and lemon juice and left to macerate in the refrigerator overnight.) Then on to Day 2 and the final steps. She specifies the type of utensils to be used (“...a copper preserving pan or two smaller rnonreactive kettles.”) No need for guess-work when following her directions – even individual yields and shelf life are included. Clearly, this is someone who is dedicated to her craft and is happy to share the joy and fun of jam preparation with all. While certainly precise in her recipes Saunders is far from a stickler for her preferences – she encourages cooks to prepare their own unique jams by following their preferences and tastes. THE BLUE CHAIR JAM COOKBOOK is the ultimate definitive guide for preparing jam and marmalade throughout the year. And, Blue Chair Fruit Co. is the ultimate place to find the fresh and distinctly flavored jams and marmalades prepared by Rachel and her team. We’ve been fortunate enough to try Damson Jam and Strawberry-Blood Orange Marmalade with Rosemary. Made from organic plums Damson Jam has a just-picked distinctive flavor and is filled with whole pieces of fruit - this is jam at its finest. The Marmalade glitters with colors of deep gold and orange slivers, while the flavor is robust, hearty, distinguished by a hint of rosemary - in a class of its own. These delights and many more may be found at www.bluechairfruit.com. Highly recommended. - Gail Cooke

  16. 4 out of 5

    Greta

    Well, I'm right in the middle on this book. Here's what I liked about it - the sheer volume of jam recipes (nearly 100, at a quick count), the interesting spins on standard recipes, and the gorgeous photos. And here's what I didn't like - its size (very large book to have on a countertop while cooking), no indication of how much the recipes make (I like to know an approximate number of jars that I need to sterilize - there's nothing worse than being caught shorthanded with a pot full of hot jam) Well, I'm right in the middle on this book. Here's what I liked about it - the sheer volume of jam recipes (nearly 100, at a quick count), the interesting spins on standard recipes, and the gorgeous photos. And here's what I didn't like - its size (very large book to have on a countertop while cooking), no indication of how much the recipes make (I like to know an approximate number of jars that I need to sterilize - there's nothing worse than being caught shorthanded with a pot full of hot jam) and the lengthy cooking times (all of these recipes are free of commercial pectin). On the plus side, if you're looking for marmalade recipes, this book has you covered. From the sheer quantity of them, I'd guess that marmalade is the author's favorite type of jam/jelly. There are recipes for Seville orange marmalade, blood orange marmalade, strawberry-orange marmalade and pink grapefruit marmalade - just to name a few.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    Gorgeous photos, but really disappointing content. Each section is basically the same recipe repeated over and over again, with 10% changed depending on the specific fruits. The entire book is probably 75% the same content repeated over and over, with slight variations. A better book would teach principles and an understanding of concepts instead of padding up the book with dozens of variations on the same theme. Furthermore, the photos are not illustrative of any sort of techniques, or even wha Gorgeous photos, but really disappointing content. Each section is basically the same recipe repeated over and over again, with 10% changed depending on the specific fruits. The entire book is probably 75% the same content repeated over and over, with slight variations. A better book would teach principles and an understanding of concepts instead of padding up the book with dozens of variations on the same theme. Furthermore, the photos are not illustrative of any sort of techniques, or even what things are supposed to look like when they're done. For example, my friend did not know what a greengage is. I had to explain that it's a plum. They could have had a photo of these plums so people know what they are. Also, some of the recipes don't take seasonality into account, including ingredients from two different seasons in the same jam.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Arlian

    While I generally stay away from cookbooks that are linked to restaurants (there is hardly ever anything worth cooking from them!!!) this book is so stand-out that it should manage to be a classic that far outlasts the life of the restaurant. It doesn't just give you recipes for replicating the jams sold at this San Francisco store. It also provides the reader with quite a bit of reference material, from the different traditional styles of marmalade preparations (which can last up to 3 days) to While I generally stay away from cookbooks that are linked to restaurants (there is hardly ever anything worth cooking from them!!!) this book is so stand-out that it should manage to be a classic that far outlasts the life of the restaurant. It doesn't just give you recipes for replicating the jams sold at this San Francisco store. It also provides the reader with quite a bit of reference material, from the different traditional styles of marmalade preparations (which can last up to 3 days) to qualities of fruit and flowers to seasonal lists of produce by month. The last bit only really applies if you live in California, but I DO so it works out great for me. A must have for those who are serious about food preservation.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jute

    I wavered between giving this book 3 stars or 4 stars. I ended up giving it 4 stars because the process and description of the process is excellent. The main reason I wavered had to do with the recipes. Not that the recipes are wrong or bad, but she is very specific about which varieties of a particular fruit to use and thus I think most of the recipes will become guidelines for me rather than actual recipes. If I can't find the particular variety I will experiment with what I can find. To sum it I wavered between giving this book 3 stars or 4 stars. I ended up giving it 4 stars because the process and description of the process is excellent. The main reason I wavered had to do with the recipes. Not that the recipes are wrong or bad, but she is very specific about which varieties of a particular fruit to use and thus I think most of the recipes will become guidelines for me rather than actual recipes. If I can't find the particular variety I will experiment with what I can find. To sum it up, her information is great and well laid out, but I felt the recipes were a bit too product specific.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Beth Tibbals-Benson

    I bought this book largely for the marmalade recipes after taking Rachel Saunders's Craftsy class. I appreciate the thorough process broken into three days for great marmalade. If I have two complaints its that I could have used some process-related visuals and that many of the recipes include ingredients not available in the Midwest. I completely appreciate Rachel's efforts to elevate jam, but was left a little disappointed at the sheer number of recipes I am unable to prepare. Including substi I bought this book largely for the marmalade recipes after taking Rachel Saunders's Craftsy class. I appreciate the thorough process broken into three days for great marmalade. If I have two complaints its that I could have used some process-related visuals and that many of the recipes include ingredients not available in the Midwest. I completely appreciate Rachel's efforts to elevate jam, but was left a little disappointed at the sheer number of recipes I am unable to prepare. Including substitutions might have been helpful. If I hadn't taken her class, which gave me the visuals I needed, I don't know that I would have purchased the book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Julie McKenna

    Good outline of jam-making technique and the fundamentals. I borrower it from the library because I was intrigued by the herb and fruit, and other different flavours that I haven't seen in other books. It was harder to find some of the ingredients than I expected. Perhaps this book is better for those in larger cities or warmer climates where more fruit options are available. I did enjoy the book and the ideas presented. Would have given a 3.5 if that had been available.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    Took this author's class on craftsy and ordered this book to check out her other recipes. The book has some beautiful pictures and many different recipes but I am honestly not sure how many I will end up making. A lot of them are overly fussy, using obscure ingredients and that's not really my style. I will keep it around for inspiration and the reference section in the back has a lot of potential to be useful but the recipes, not so much.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Summer

    Gorgeous but most recipes require at least two days and multiple steps. Great for inspiration, but if you are a quick, small-batch type jam maker, there isn't much here for you. Did I say it was gorgeous? It's a really beautiful book and I read most of the recipes, but it's going back to the library untested, I'm afraid.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Aimee Canterbury

    this book is the ONLY jam cookbook anyone will ever need, for their entire lifetime (and one to pass along after youve passed along). wonderful. full of delicious photos, and even more delicious jams. i have made about 5 diffrrent recipes with no problems. this book has been a wonderful addition to my cookbook shelf!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Marianna Monaco

    In my never-ending quest for jam recipes that use little sugar and little pectin, this book is a gem. The recipes are loaded with sugar, however, Rachel Saunders' approach to making jams without pectin and her wildly experimental combinations of flavors will be an influence on my own creative jam-making journey.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nate

    Lovely recipes for unique and more 'funky' combinations of flavors. I find I use it more for inspiration for jam rather than referring directly to it's recipes. It's one downside: it makes me loathe those that have California produce growing outside their front door. That aside, beautifully designed and photographed and a great addition any cookbook collection.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    I cannot wait to buy this cookbook and stain all my clothes with varied assortments of berries and citrus! An old friend of mine, Alison, has a fantastic blog (alaalison.com) and she has used this cookbook to guide her through some delicious jams, so far.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    I would have bought this for the fashion, beautiful outfits, so I was excited when the recipes actually tastes good as well. Fantasticly clear directions and great notes ensure your success whether a seasoned jammer or for your first adventure in the world of preserving.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Beth Lequeuvre

    Best jam cookbook I've ever read. I am definitely buying this one! This is a piece of art.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    Pretty pictures. Makes me dream of summer. And I really want to try to make marmalade.

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