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The Light Fantastic (Discworld #2)

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Ketika ini menuju ke suatu tabrakan yang tak dapat dihindarkan dengan suatu bintang merah yang suka dengki, Discworld hanya punya satu kemungkinan penyelamat. Sialnya, ini terjadi pada penyihir ceroboh yang unik dan pengecut bernama Rincewind. Ia terakhir terlihat jatuh ke tepian dunia.... Dari pengarang fantasi paling lucu dan non-ortodoks di bumi ataupun galaksi yang lai Ketika ini menuju ke suatu tabrakan yang tak dapat dihindarkan dengan suatu bintang merah yang suka dengki, Discworld hanya punya satu kemungkinan penyelamat. Sialnya, ini terjadi pada penyihir ceroboh yang unik dan pengecut bernama Rincewind. Ia terakhir terlihat jatuh ke tepian dunia.... Dari pengarang fantasi paling lucu dan non-ortodoks di bumi ataupun galaksi yang lain.


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Ketika ini menuju ke suatu tabrakan yang tak dapat dihindarkan dengan suatu bintang merah yang suka dengki, Discworld hanya punya satu kemungkinan penyelamat. Sialnya, ini terjadi pada penyihir ceroboh yang unik dan pengecut bernama Rincewind. Ia terakhir terlihat jatuh ke tepian dunia.... Dari pengarang fantasi paling lucu dan non-ortodoks di bumi ataupun galaksi yang lai Ketika ini menuju ke suatu tabrakan yang tak dapat dihindarkan dengan suatu bintang merah yang suka dengki, Discworld hanya punya satu kemungkinan penyelamat. Sialnya, ini terjadi pada penyihir ceroboh yang unik dan pengecut bernama Rincewind. Ia terakhir terlihat jatuh ke tepian dunia.... Dari pengarang fantasi paling lucu dan non-ortodoks di bumi ataupun galaksi yang lain.

30 review for The Light Fantastic (Discworld #2)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lyn

    Reading Sir Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series makes me smile. Three years after Terry Pratchett published The Color of Magic, the first Discworld book, he published the second, The Light Fantastic, having decided convincingly that this was a worthwhile project. Though the action in The Light Fantastic takes over immediately following the events in the first book, Rincewind has fallen off of the edge of the world, this novel seems to gather momentum from a good but somewhat shaky start and proceed Reading Sir Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series makes me smile. Three years after Terry Pratchett published The Color of Magic, the first Discworld book, he published the second, The Light Fantastic, having decided convincingly that this was a worthwhile project. Though the action in The Light Fantastic takes over immediately following the events in the first book, Rincewind has fallen off of the edge of the world, this novel seems to gather momentum from a good but somewhat shaky start and proceed with a comic authority. While The Colour of Magic could have been a funny stand alone, Pratchett’s entry with The Light Fantastic seems to usher in a certainty that the Discworld as a multiverse, as a literary institution, has begun and with no end in sight. Actually, I suppose he could have written a third, making the obligatory trilogy and then moving on to something else, but Pratchett wraps up his story tidily and leaves the fertile soil of Discworld as a fun idea from which more books can be written. (There are over 50 works in publication, and the series is a phenomenon with over 80 million novels sold and in 37 languages. Pratchett himself was knighted in 2009). So what is all the fuss about? Our heroes Rincewind and Twoflower go on an adventure to save the world, or try to, or accidentally end up in all the right places, or something. The real hero of the novel, and of the series, is Pratchett himself. It is his narration that amuses, cajoles, and encourages laughter and that keeps the reader’s attention. Playfully, and with wry English humor, Pratchett weaves a fun fantasy story with references to Biblical, classical, and mythical themes as well as modern subjects like Conan the Barbarian. It is simply, a lot of fun.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    Re-read with buddies! I'm still very much enjoying these early Pratchett books, especially in mind that I'll be seeing a *lot* more of these folks in the near future. And even if I'll mainly be focused on folks I haven't seen yet, anyway, I'm still enjoying what may as well be an overview primer of the whole Discworld universe. That being said, I think Rincewind is given a bad rap in the series. I love the hell out of him. He's the ultimate bumbling idiot under the geas of a penultimate Eighth Spe Re-read with buddies! I'm still very much enjoying these early Pratchett books, especially in mind that I'll be seeing a *lot* more of these folks in the near future. And even if I'll mainly be focused on folks I haven't seen yet, anyway, I'm still enjoying what may as well be an overview primer of the whole Discworld universe. That being said, I think Rincewind is given a bad rap in the series. I love the hell out of him. He's the ultimate bumbling idiot under the geas of a penultimate Eighth Spell, the casting of which will make or destroy the universe or something, and the making and breaking is ultimately left up only to him. And he's a wizard with a hat that says "wizzard" on it. You know... to make sure people understand that he's actually one of their kind. :) I particularly loved the bits with the floating rocks and the computers of the universe and the dungeon universes and, of course, Cohen the Barbarian. It's funny, it's BIG, and we even get to see the tourism industry take off in a really big way, even going so far as to have the very first tourist play a big part in a very special birth. Awwwww... So sweet! :) Plotwise, I think it's well up to the standards of the rest of the series and while Rincewind falls away in people's favor, *cry* He'll always have a very special place in my heart. And by the way, that sword is definitely smarter than him. Oh well! Great fun! Even better the second time!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Helen 2.0

    I adore Terry Pratchett. I don't know how to elaborate on that so I'll just share some of my favorite moments in Light Fantastic. Snarky social commentary: She is there, down below the mines and sea ooze and fake fossil bones put there by a Creator with nothing better to do than upset archaeologists and give them silly ideas. Not for the first time she reflected that there were many drawbacks to being a swordswoman, not the least of which was that men didn't take you seriously until you'd actuall I adore Terry Pratchett. I don't know how to elaborate on that so I'll just share some of my favorite moments in Light Fantastic. Snarky social commentary: She is there, down below the mines and sea ooze and fake fossil bones put there by a Creator with nothing better to do than upset archaeologists and give them silly ideas. Not for the first time she reflected that there were many drawbacks to being a swordswoman, not the least of which was that men didn't take you seriously until you'd actually killed them, by which time it didn't really matter anyway. (...) But she was too big to be a thief, too honest to be an assassin, too intelligent to be a wife, and too proud to enter the only other female profession generally available. General humor: Someone who spent his life living rough under the sky knew the value of a good thick book, which ought to outlast at least a season of cooking fires if you were careful how you tore the pages out. Magic! So that's what it felt like! No wonder wizards didn't have much truck with sex! "She's not bad," said Twoflower. "She's going to marry a friend of ours." "Does he know?" Most people on the Disc were currently in a state of mind normally achievable only by a lifetime of dedicated meditation or about thirty seconds of illegal herbage. The lamest pun ever: "Rincewind, all the shops have been smashed open, there was a whole bunch of people across the street helping themselves to musical instruments, can you believe that?" "Yeah," said Rincewind. "Luters, I expect." The Luggage remains my favorite: The Luggage said nothing. "Look he's not my responsibility," said Rincewind. "Let's be absolutely clear about that." The Luggage said nothing, but louder this time. "Um," said Twoflower. "Yes. That's about enough, I think. Put him down, please." The Luggage gave a creak of betrayal at the sound of its master's voice. I might briefly have shipped Rincewind and Twoflower in this moment: (Rincewind, about Twoflower) He just looks at things, but nothing he looks at is ever the same again. Including me, I expect.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Antonio

    Decidí darle una segunda oportunidad al Mundodisco, porque los fans de Pratchett me han comentado que la saga lo merece, no porque tenga algún problema obsesivo compulsivo con dejar cosas sin terminar... y ¡Wau! las diferencias entre El color de la magia y La luz fantástica son abismales, casi todos los problemas que tuve con el primer libro se resuelven acá, este si me pareció gracioso, si es concluyente y... resuelve una incógnita del primer libro que me molestaba bastante Rincewind, a pesar de Decidí darle una segunda oportunidad al Mundodisco, porque los fans de Pratchett me han comentado que la saga lo merece, no porque tenga algún problema obsesivo compulsivo con dejar cosas sin terminar... y ¡Wau! las diferencias entre El color de la magia y La luz fantástica son abismales, casi todos los problemas que tuve con el primer libro se resuelven acá, este si me pareció gracioso, si es concluyente y... resuelve una incógnita del primer libro que me molestaba bastante Rincewind, a pesar de ser un mago bastante simplón y no hacer magia, sobrevive a toda la serie de eventos desafortunados que se le ha presentado, pues hay una razón para ello. En la luz fantástica continuaremos la historia de Rincewind y Dosflores (Two-flo-wers) esta pareja dispareja que ha desarrollado una especie de amistad gracias a todas sus aventuras y cuya travesía por el Disco aun no termina, y que seria de ellos sin el fiel Equipaje el mejor de los artilugios mágicos de todos los tiempos, ademas, esta vez conoceremos a Cohen el bárbaro, el guerrero mas famoso del disco, que ya tiene 87 años y esta sufriendo problemas de espalda, lo que no le impide realizar proezas, solo las hace mas graciosas. En fin, esta libro me gusto mucho, me saco varias risas y me dejo con ganas de leer mas del Mundodisco, me alegra haberle dado otra oportunidad a la saga, y creo que si habéis leído El color de la magia, debes leer este libro, quien sabe quizás quedes sonriendo como un necrófilo en un depósito de cadáveres.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Phrynne

    Put two of my favourite Discworld characters,the Luggage and Death, into the same book and I am obviously going to be happy! This was a reread of this book which I read the first time many years ago. Pratchett obviously improved his writing as the series progressed and his books became more sophisticated, but these early works are still a delight. I love the humour, the characters, the story and the sheer imagination of the man. The world is poorer without him but thank goodness he left us so man Put two of my favourite Discworld characters,the Luggage and Death, into the same book and I am obviously going to be happy! This was a reread of this book which I read the first time many years ago. Pratchett obviously improved his writing as the series progressed and his books became more sophisticated, but these early works are still a delight. I love the humour, the characters, the story and the sheer imagination of the man. The world is poorer without him but thank goodness he left us so many books to enjoy.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Light Fantastic (Discworld #2), Terry Pratchett The Light Fantastic is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the second of the Discworld series. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: ششم ماه می سال 2016 میلادی عنوان: مجموعه جهان صفحه - کتاب 02 - نور حیرت انگیز؛ نویسنده: سر تری پرتچت (پراچت)؛ مترجم: آرزو احمی؛ تهران، ویدا، 1392؛ در 290 ص؛ شابک: 9789646807860؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان انگلیسی قرن 20 م ادامه کتاب نخست است از سری جهان صفحه این مجموعه بیش از چهل رمان است که در زمینهٔ خیالپردازی و طنز و هزل هستند؛ The Light Fantastic (Discworld #2), Terry Pratchett The Light Fantastic is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the second of the Discworld series. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: ششم ماه می سال 2016 میلادی عنوان: مجموعه جهان صفحه - کتاب 02 - نور حیرت انگیز؛ نویسنده: سر تری پرتچت (پراچت)؛ مترجم: آرزو احمی؛ تهران، ویدا، 1392؛ در 290 ص؛ شابک: 9789646807860؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان انگلیسی قرن 20 م ادامه کتاب نخست است از سری جهان صفحه این مجموعه بیش از چهل رمان است که در زمینهٔ خیالپردازی و طنز و هزل هستند؛ و تقریباً هر چیزی را زیر این آسمان و تابش خورشید، به‌ سخره گرفته‌ اند. دیسک‌ ورلد، صفحهٔ تختی است که روی شانهٔ چهار فیل غول‌پیکر قرار گرفته، فیل‌هایی که خود بر روی پشت آتوئین کبیر، لاک‌ پشت عظیم‌ الجثه‌ ای قرار گرفته‌ اند، که در دنیای بیکران، شناکنان به سوی مقصد نامعلومی حرکت می‌کند. رمان‌های تری پرچت؛ تقریباً هرچه شخصیت خیالی و علمی-تخیلی ست، را شامل می‌شود، ایده‌ ها و حقه‌ها، شرکت فیلم‌سازی برگمن، استرالیا، انتشار روزنامه، موزیک راک اند رول، فرهنگ، فلسفه، تاریخ مصر باستان، مهاجرت قبایل اولیه، بی‌نظمی و سلطنت. و ... تا به امروز از این مجموعه رمانهای: نور حیرت انگیز؛ مورت؛ رنگ جادو؛ خواهران سرنوشت، جادوی مرجع؛ اهرام؛ آیینهای برابر در کشور ما نیز ترجمه و منتشر شده است. ا. شربیانی

  7. 5 out of 5

    Evelyn (devours and digests words)

    "Inside every sane person, there's a madman struggling to get out. That's what I've always thought. No one goes mad quicker than a totally sane person." The second installment in the Discworld series is a bigger, funnier delight. One heck of a Laugh Out Loud read. Something I consider very special in Sir Terry Pratchett's works is that many authors can pull off a joke every once in a while in their stories but Mr Pratchett managed to keep the whole thing comical, while at the time satirical. Not "Inside every sane person, there's a madman struggling to get out. That's what I've always thought. No one goes mad quicker than a totally sane person." The second installment in the Discworld series is a bigger, funnier delight. One heck of a Laugh Out Loud read. Something I consider very special in Sir Terry Pratchett's works is that many authors can pull off a joke every once in a while in their stories but Mr Pratchett managed to keep the whole thing comical, while at the time satirical. Not once did I not grin or snort out loud. In The Colour of Magic, Rincewind was last seen (read?) falling off the rim of the world. Well, he landed safely on his arse. Thank goodness or he couldn't be much use if he's dead. Things are turning quite grim now. Great A'Tuin the turtle is wading its giant flippers toward a 'red star'. The closer it is (I feel very sorry for calling the World Turtle an 'it' but in my defense, 'it's' sex is still undetermined afterall!) to the star, the weaker and more unbalanced the magic is back in Discworld! The only way to prevent the apocalypse is to recite all 8 spells from a magic book called Octavo. However one last spell is missing. Where could it be?! It also didn't help Rincewind's situation and mood when he found out that there's a certain prophecy about him. I'm not a big reader when it comes to books with apocalypse in it looming just around the corner. Too bleak, I say. But this was a purely fun ride that follows with Rincewind's unfortunate adventures. The worldbuilding is still just as bizarre as the last book. Except now it has a fairytale feel to it. There's even a scene where Rincewind and Twoflower took refuge in a gingerbread house! Sounds familiar? *cough* Hansel and Gretel! *cough* Characterizations [humans, fantastical creatures and things alike]: I have a very special place in my heart for nearly all the people and creatures in the book. Of course I have certain favourites myself but I couldn't resist liking nearly everything and everyone. It sounds so corny of me, I know. But damn it, I can't help myself not when they're all so fleshed out well. Definitely not when they each have their own unique quirky personality. Rincewind shows even more of his cynicism and it didn't exactly help his ill bedside manners being partnered with the impossibly, insufferably optimistic Twoflower. "I expect everything will turn out quite all right in the end," said Twoflower. Rincewind looked at him. Remarks like that always threw him off. "Do you really believe that? I mean," he said. "Really?" "Well, things generally do work out satisfactorily, when you come to think about it." "If you think the total disruption of my life in the last year is satisfactory then you might be right. I've lost count of the times I've nearly been killed--" "Twenty-seven," said Twoflower. "What?" He held a great disdain within him toward people and situations in life. He's not just cynical, I like to think of him as pessimistic too. He also has a knack of running in the opposite directions from things he's terrified of instead of plunging straight into the fire and save the day. Some people would say that he's quite the coward. I would say that he's quite the survivalist. 'He always held that panic was the best means of survival; back in the olden days, his theory went, people faced with hungry saber-toothed tigers could be divided very simply into those who panicked and those who stood there saying. "What a magnificent brute!" and "Here, pussy." Rincewind's snappy moods, impatience and crankiness have really grown on me. Irregardless of how distasteful his actions may be at times! I have to tip my hat on behalf of Twoflower, the first tourist of Ankh-Morpork may be the only one who can understand and tolerate Rincewind. While he is pessimistic, Twoflower is optimistic. Rincewind's cowardly but Twoflowers's noble and is willing to sacrifice himself to save others. Rincewind is quick to rage but Twoflower's best merits are his patience and his forgiving nature. "Against the whole of human experience Twoflower believed that if only people would talk to each other, have a few drinks, exchange pictures of their grandchildren, maybe take in a show or something, then everything could be sorted out. He also believed that people were basically good but sometimes had their bad days." How can I not resist someone like him? I can't! He's so good-hearted, it either made you despise how he's so insufferably annoying at that or... you find him irresistible. It is the latter for me. Then there's The Luggage, it's name suggest what it is. A luggage that carries laundries for its master! Except it's no ordinary luggage. For one thing, it has hundreds of tiny little legs to take it anywhere. It's lid serves as a mouth and when it wants to look menancing, it snaps the lid up and down. Don't get too close - it's a luggage that bites and snaps and eats people up! With the Luggage in your possession, you can be in no harm as long as: a) you're not trying to harm it's master and his friends. b) you don't kick its wooden sides and be a big bully. c) you don't try to force open its lid apart to see what treasure is inside (there are usually none). So aside from looking menancing, what else does it do? You'd be awed that not only The Luggage is useful in carrying loads, it is also very loyal, quick in thinking and even quicker so in taking actions (with those hundreds of little legs? No doubt) to save those in distress. Don't ask me how a luggage can think. I have no idea! Point is, the Luggage can be real scary to the point that even barbarians soil their trousers. You should be scared. Then there are the minor people, creatures and things alike such as a group of incompetent swordsmen led by a woman, talking trees, a goblin, an imp who paints, a barbarian, DEATH and his comrades, stone trolls, a cursed shopkeeper, a mob of crazy superstitious people with pitchforks.... and so on and so forth. I expected to get clogged up with all these many minor characters coming and going. But not-so-surprisingly, I didn't feel confused or got side tracked by them. Each one of them has personalities and they're not forgettable. Not when they do or say something incredibly incredible, funny or stupid. Pratchett can write about the smallest pebble on a ground of dirt and still make it interesting and full of persona. As a final conclusion, I can't say much except that... well, this book was just fucking fantastic and it won my heart and soul completely. That about sums up my thoughts. Besides, it's almost impossible to pick apart or find anything wrong in something that can switch on your 'HAHA' button each seconds. The jokes are distracting! Doctor's Prescription and Warning: This is the medicine for when you feel blue or angry. No, it's not supposed to be some pills. It's this book. However, read with care for each sentences and every passages are induced with high dosages of humour. Limit your level of intake in case you overdosed on the words and choke on your spit bellowing with laughter.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    3.5 stars (yes, I actually liked the first one a bit better) "The important thing about having lots of things to remember is that you've got to go somewhere afterward where you can remember them, you see? You've got to stop. You haven't really been anywhere until you've got back home." Thus, this second book in the Discworld series is about the continued adventure of Twoflower, the very first tourist, and Rincewind, the failed wiz(z)ard with only one spell in his head. We get to know more about tha 3.5 stars (yes, I actually liked the first one a bit better) "The important thing about having lots of things to remember is that you've got to go somewhere afterward where you can remember them, you see? You've got to stop. You haven't really been anywhere until you've got back home." Thus, this second book in the Discworld series is about the continued adventure of Twoflower, the very first tourist, and Rincewind, the failed wiz(z)ard with only one spell in his head. We get to know more about that spell in particular and how it caused Rincewind to fail at being a wizard. Moreover, we get to see much more of the Unseen University and their machinations. At the beginning, we start where the last novel ended and I really think the two books should be considered one story. Twoflower in the ship and Rincewind and the Luggage without a mode of transportation have "gone overboard". However, the most magical book on the entire Dicworld (the Octavo) can't let Rincewind die so magic saves them. From there, they continue their journey through odd landscapes (a very peculiar forest for example) and meet new people (like Cohen, a parody of Conan the Barbarian). Oh, and to make matters more interesting, we then find out that the Discworld is about to be destroyed unless the eight spells of the Octavo are being recited in time. (view spoiler)[What happens after they have been recited was actually one of my favourite scenes in the movie and this book - I mean BABY TURTLES! *swoons* (hide spoiler)] What I also liked was the portrayal of DEATH's domain (not to mention (view spoiler)[his adopted daughter - BWAHAHAHAHAHA (hide spoiler)] )! But then again, I always had a weakness for the bony fella. ;) Again, the book had some interesting spins on ideas, witty observations about our the Discworld, as well as funny moments, but nothing groundbreaking or laugh-out-loud. As I stated before, I think this and the first should be regarded as one piece, because of the story and because of how it was delivered so it's no surprise there isn't much more to say about this except for what has already been said in my review for the previous volume. However, I will point out that one of the saviors in this story and a wonderful character all on its own, was luggage! I really liked the little guy with his right-action-at-the-right-time interventions and "comments" on certain matters. I marked a few lines and passages in this book again but am leaving you with this, one of my favourites: "Inside every sane person there's a madman struggling to get out. That's what I've always thought. No one goes mad quicker than a totally sane person."

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    I'm pretty sure people have told me about Pratchett and his Diskworld series before, usually working in the phrase "He's the Douglas Adams of fantasy" into the description. But the problem was that I always felt that I had had enough of Adams after the third Hithiker's Guide to the Galaxy book, and whenever I scanned Pratchett's section in the bookstore I was immediately put off by not knowing where to start reading among the approximately five hundred thousand Diskworld books. I'm glad I finall I'm pretty sure people have told me about Pratchett and his Diskworld series before, usually working in the phrase "He's the Douglas Adams of fantasy" into the description. But the problem was that I always felt that I had had enough of Adams after the third Hithiker's Guide to the Galaxy book, and whenever I scanned Pratchett's section in the bookstore I was immediately put off by not knowing where to start reading among the approximately five hundred thousand Diskworld books. I'm glad I finally took the time to find out that these two books, The Colour of Magic and The Light Fantastic, jointly comprise the first tale in the series, and that they were definitely worth reading. The Diskworld books are essentially satire of the high fantasy genre, or at least that's the foundation upon which everything else is built. This pair of books follows the misadventures of Rincewind, a utterly inept and thoroughly cowardly wizard, and Twoflowers, a clueless traveler who happens to be in possession of both endless optimism and a magical suitcase that's always wandering off and messily devouring people who get in its way. Things go from bad to worse for the two as divine powers both deliver them into and yank them out of all kinds of fantastic perils. As someone who grew up reading plenty of this kind of thing and playing a lot of Dungeons& Dragons, I'm familiar enough with the genre and trappings that Pratchett lampoons. Yes, there's the Conan parody, there's the Dragonriders of Pern tribute, there's the in-joke about Leiber's Fafhrd and Gray Mouser. But that's easy. The thing that made me almost immediately fall in love with these books is the author's dry wit and his ability to derive humor not only from the absurdity of the story (and believe me, it gets plenty absurd) but also from just good old fashioned turns of phrase, wry commentary, and jokes. The guy just has an amazing ability to stuff five or six jokes into a single sentence, most of them making masterful use of that trusty standby of British humor, irony. It's really smart and really funny, and the fact that it builds on the inherent silliness of the high fantasy genre is just icing. I should also note how imaginative Pratchett is, which is a useful quality given his subject matter. He bounces his heroes from one (generally horrible and dangerous) situation to another at a frantic pace, and his ability to come up with new material and new situations amazes me. And while many of them are obvious parodies of fantasy staples, just as many seem to be wholly new creations. As one small (and obligatory) example, the Diskworld itself is a flat coin of a world that rides atop four enormous elephants, who themselves ride on the back of a colossal turtle with two continent-sized flippers that it uses to swim slowly through the cold reaches of space. But at the same time, if I have one complaint about these first two books, it's that they're almost maniacal in their plotting. While it's nice to see Pratchett's considerable imagination and humor on display as we go from situation to situation, the first book reads like an extended doodle with little plot and a whole "gods playing games with mortals" subtext that's entirely dropped in the next book. There's also one Conan the Barbarian parody that's abruptly dropped in favor of another Conan the Barbarian parody who Pratchett apparently liked better. It's not until the latter part of the second book does an overall plot come into play, but honestly I was enjoying myself so much I really didn't mind. Expect to see lots more Discworld books reviewed here in the future.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    This book was every bit as fun as the last- maybe more so. Since this is number two in series order, I am getting a feel for where the author was at the point in time it was written. The character development seems more vivid. Rincewind, the Luggage, the Druid sacrifice girl, and the over the hill barbarian fighter are characters that will live with me long after this series is done. This story has more of a quest feel to it than the last one did. It definitely builds to a strong climax. In order This book was every bit as fun as the last- maybe more so. Since this is number two in series order, I am getting a feel for where the author was at the point in time it was written. The character development seems more vivid. Rincewind, the Luggage, the Druid sacrifice girl, and the over the hill barbarian fighter are characters that will live with me long after this series is done. This story has more of a quest feel to it than the last one did. It definitely builds to a strong climax. In order to avert certain doom, all of the eight great spells must be read in order. The eighth and final spell is, of course, in Rincewind’s mind. His death would solve that problem for the planet’s most powerful spell casters. The story progresses through one mishap after another as the author continues to add characters and build his world. Rather than read these books by order of character type (for example, all of the Rincewind stories followed by all of the Witches stories and so forth), I have chosen to attempt to read them chronologically. I think it gives a clear picture of where the author is at in a point in time and what his conception of this world and these characters is and is becoming.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Elena

    3.5-4* Aunque esta historia empieza dónde lo dejó su primera parte (El Color de la Magia), me ha parecido mucho mejor, menos caótica y más entrañable. Imposible no reírse con los guiños a los cuentos infantiles, Conan (o Cohen xD) el Bárbaro y con las aventuras de Rincewind y Dosflores. Al final del libro hasta me he dado cuenta del cariño que les he cogido a este par de desastrillos.. (: Gracias Pratchett por el buen rato!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    Executive Summary: I enjoyed this one a lot more than The Color of Magic, and it made me glad I read that book first rather than starting with one of the later in the series. Full Review A moment of silence for the passing of a great man. It's a shame it took the passing of Terry Pratchett for me to give this series a second chance. I've had numerous people tell me how much I'd like it. It was recommended again to me when I said I was in a funk and wanted something light and fun just a few days b Executive Summary: I enjoyed this one a lot more than The Color of Magic, and it made me glad I read that book first rather than starting with one of the later in the series. Full Review A moment of silence for the passing of a great man. It's a shame it took the passing of Terry Pratchett for me to give this series a second chance. I've had numerous people tell me how much I'd like it. It was recommended again to me when I said I was in a funk and wanted something light and fun just a few days before his passing. I just wasn't sure about it though. I'm often stubborn. I know it. I like to read things in publication order. I know this series is more like a loose collection of stories set in the same world, but I still want to read it in the order it came out. So I read The Color of Magic last year, and it was alright. I did plan on reading this book at some point, but I kept putting it off. I wish I hadn't. The humor was better, the plot was more interesting, and some great new characters were introduced. And the puns. Man there are some great puns in here. I had to stop reading for a few minutes because I was laughing so hard. I'm not normally big on puns, but they really worked for me in this book. I won't ruin them for you though, you should read them for yourself. So now I'm hooked on the series. I jumped right into Equal Rites and I'm nearly done with that. I'll likely be jumping right into Mort after that. I'm sad Mr. Pratchett has left us, and that I didn't get a chance to meet him and thank him for his great work. But I'm excited by the fact that I have nearly 40 more books to enjoy. I may have to pace myself though as there will sadly only be one more to come. I can't say you should be stubborn like I am, and read in publication order. Most people seem to recommend starting with Guards! Guards! or Small Gods. I will say that if you do start with The Color of Magic make sure you read this one too, because not only is it a continuation of the plot, it's a vast improvement in every way.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    The story picks up where the first one left off, with Rincewind, Twoflower and the Luggage in dire peril. They're mysteriously saved and plonked down in the middle of a magical forest. Meanwhile an ominous red star has appeared in the sky of the disk and it appears to be growing each night. The Wizards of Unseen University want to read the Octavo to save the Disc, but Rincewind still has one of the Eight spells stuck in his head, so the hunt for the wizard is on. I have no idea how many times I'v The story picks up where the first one left off, with Rincewind, Twoflower and the Luggage in dire peril. They're mysteriously saved and plonked down in the middle of a magical forest. Meanwhile an ominous red star has appeared in the sky of the disk and it appears to be growing each night. The Wizards of Unseen University want to read the Octavo to save the Disc, but Rincewind still has one of the Eight spells stuck in his head, so the hunt for the wizard is on. I have no idea how many times I've read this, other than I'm sure this is at least my third time through. I had set my expectations of these first few Discworld novels based on a memory that they weren't all that good compared to later novels in the series, but to my happy surprise I found myself greatly enjoying this. This novel in a lot of ways, rather than The Colour of Magic, feels like the genesis of what the Discworld becomes. In this one you get the introduction of the Librarian, Death's daughter Ysabell, Cohen the Barbarian and the beginnings of the more nuanced character of Death himself. This quote from Death regarding the rampant stupidity of the Star cultists could easily have come from a much later book:NOT LIKE THIS. THE DEATH OF THE WARRIOR OR THE OLD MAN OR THE LITTLE CHILD, THIS I UNDERSTAND, AND I TAKE AWAY THE PAIN AND END THE SUFFERING. I DO NOT UNDERSTAND THIS DEATH-OF-THE-MIND.All-in-all, it's the first inklings of the strong character work, social commentary and razor sharp humor that have made Pratchett a household name. Very glad to revise my rating of this book to 5 stars and now I've very much looking forward to Equal Rites and Sourcery, neither of which I've reread before.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Qt

    I liked this one even more than the first book of the series! I thought it was hilarious, and I found the storyline easier to follow. There were a couple times where I was a bit confused, but I really enjoyed it and thought it was funny and exciting, with a thrilling ending.

  15. 4 out of 5

    BrokenTune

    So, that's how Rincewind ended up with the Luggage! Right,..... I have been wondering about this for years. Now I know. There is no doubt that Terry Pratchett was a master at snarky humor and fantastic world building. No doubt at all. Yet, it takes me forever to get through some his books because his adventures often end up going off in tangents...and I'm not drawn into the Discworld universe enough to necessarily want to follow those side-stories that may or may not become relevant in a later boo So, that's how Rincewind ended up with the Luggage! Right,..... I have been wondering about this for years. Now I know. There is no doubt that Terry Pratchett was a master at snarky humor and fantastic world building. No doubt at all. Yet, it takes me forever to get through some his books because his adventures often end up going off in tangents...and I'm not drawn into the Discworld universe enough to necessarily want to follow those side-stories that may or may not become relevant in a later book. At the moment, all those tangents are just padding out the book for me - when mostly I just want to get on with the story. So, why the Druids? Anyhoo,....I do look forward to reading the next one, but may chose a graphic novel version. I hear they are great fun, and it would have been great to have seen the pictures of new worlds hatching.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Randy

    Laurel and Hardy. Riggs and Murtaugh. Oscar and Felix. And continuing the grand tradition, the Discworld's own Rincewind and Twoflower. This time the story centers around the Octavo and the 8th spell lodged in Rincewind's head as Discworld plunges towards a fiery red star that may spell doom for the entire planet. Lovecraftian influences are prominent in the early and late goings, although most of the book is a lighthearted slapstick parody of the fantasy genre. The story often appears direction Laurel and Hardy. Riggs and Murtaugh. Oscar and Felix. And continuing the grand tradition, the Discworld's own Rincewind and Twoflower. This time the story centers around the Octavo and the 8th spell lodged in Rincewind's head as Discworld plunges towards a fiery red star that may spell doom for the entire planet. Lovecraftian influences are prominent in the early and late goings, although most of the book is a lighthearted slapstick parody of the fantasy genre. The story often appears directionless and sags in the middle like an aging businessman but overall it's a quick and entertaining read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mangrii

    Sería un 3,75 o cerca del 4, no lo tengo del todo claro. Esta es la continuación de El color de la magia, el primer volumen de la saga Mundodisco, siendo la única novela de la saga que continua directamente con los sucesos del libro anterior. En este libro, tras salvarse de caer por el borde del mundo; Dosflores, Rincewind y el querido equipaje vuelven a meterse en muchos más líos. Una estrella roja amenaza la vida de la gran tortuga ATuin, y la Universidad Invisible (la de los magos) está tratand Sería un 3,75 o cerca del 4, no lo tengo del todo claro. Esta es la continuación de El color de la magia, el primer volumen de la saga Mundodisco, siendo la única novela de la saga que continua directamente con los sucesos del libro anterior. En este libro, tras salvarse de caer por el borde del mundo; Dosflores, Rincewind y el querido equipaje vuelven a meterse en muchos más líos. Una estrella roja amenaza la vida de la gran tortuga A´Tuin, y la Universidad Invisible (la de los magos) está tratando de reunir los 8 hechizos del Octavo, una hechizos prohibidos de gran poder que creen que podrán salvar el mundo. Uno de ellos como sabemos desde el primer libro lo tiene Rincewind en su cabeza, por ello, junto a un guerrero legendario del disco llamado Cohen y una virgen que iba a ser sacrificada por druidas llamada Bethan; trataran de lidiar con los viejos profesores de la Universidad Invisible. Al igual que en la primera parte, me lo he pasado muy bien, o incluso mejor, dado que el libro tiene mayor coherencia narrativa y ya estamos acostumbrados al mundo. El estilo es el mismo, con un humor absurdo y delirante, con algunos diálogos desternillantes y con unos personajes geniales. De nuevo la historia es totalmente absurda y está llena de guiños a otros clásicos, como Conan o Hanzel y Gretel. Los personajes vuelven a ser algo maravilloso y desternillante; y también os encontraréis en esta ocasión con árboles parlantes, casas de chocolate, trolls amigables, guerreros legendarios y magia, mucha magia. Eso si, tengo claro que me ha gustado mucho más que el primero, es menos caótico y más fácil de seguir la trama; y la enseñanza de que casi nada es lo que puede parecer es una de las reflexiones más adecuadas. Lo que me ha fastidiado un poquito es el final abierto, y la perdida de ese personaje que me gustaba tanto, pero creo que reaparece en alguna nueva aventura. Tengo muchas ganas de continuar con la saga, poquito a poco pero con paso firme, pero de momento me esta gustando el reto de leerlas en orden de publicación.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mattia Ravasi

    Video review Featured in my Top 20 Books I Read in 2017 So good it's unfair - there's a joke every three words and it's still thrilling, and occasionally heartbreaking. Surprinsingly better than The Colour of Magic.

  19. 5 out of 5

    TL

    I enjoyed this more than the first book (eve though I do like that one), the pacing was better and the characters more "there" and comfortable in their own skins. It seems/feels to me Mr. Pratchett hit his stride and had more fun writing this one (I could be wrong)... We get to see more of Rincewind's personality in here and he comes into his own some more. Twoflower, gotta love him :) Cohen and Bethan were fun to know, wish they would have had a bigger part though. Cohen was pretty spry for his I enjoyed this more than the first book (eve though I do like that one), the pacing was better and the characters more "there" and comfortable in their own skins. It seems/feels to me Mr. Pratchett hit his stride and had more fun writing this one (I could be wrong)... We get to see more of Rincewind's personality in here and he comes into his own some more. Twoflower, gotta love him :) Cohen and Bethan were fun to know, wish they would have had a bigger part though. Cohen was pretty spry for his age and I loved his loyalty to the gang. The ending was better in this one but it felt a little anticlimatic to me, didn't feel the tension in some parts even though it was well written. Crappy review but I'm tired :-P haha.. Would recommend, another fun adventure from Mr. Pratchett.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Celise

    The important thing about having lots of things to remember is that you've got to go somewhere afterwards where you can remember them, you see? You've got to stop. You haven't really been anywhere until you've got back home." The Discworld is a Disc sitting on the backs of four elephants, standing on the shell of a giant turtle that is slowly swimming it's way through Space... And as befits a world so ridiculous, it is filled with an array of equally ridiculous and loveable characters, includi The important thing about having lots of things to remember is that you've got to go somewhere afterwards where you can remember them, you see? You've got to stop. You haven't really been anywhere until you've got back home." The Discworld is a Disc sitting on the backs of four elephants, standing on the shell of a giant turtle that is slowly swimming it's way through Space... And as befits a world so ridiculous, it is filled with an array of equally ridiculous and loveable characters, including a piece of travelling Luggage with lots of tiny legs and an intimidating appetite. This is one of the most hilariously enjoyable series I've found in a long time. "In a distant forest a wolf howled, felt embarrassed when no one joined in, and stopped."

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lata

    1.5 to a very grudging 2 stars. Mostly slogged and skimmed my way through this second Discworld installment. Did not smile, chuckle or laugh at anything, found everyone tedious, with the exception of Twoflower and Luggage; I am inordinately fond of Luggage, who remains the standout for me(view spoiler)[, though I was deeply disappointed that Luggage chose to stick with Rincewind at the end (hide spoiler)] . I was not fond of any other characters or anything else in the story. Which was far, far, 1.5 to a very grudging 2 stars. Mostly slogged and skimmed my way through this second Discworld installment. Did not smile, chuckle or laugh at anything, found everyone tedious, with the exception of Twoflower and Luggage; I am inordinately fond of Luggage, who remains the standout for me(view spoiler)[, though I was deeply disappointed that Luggage chose to stick with Rincewind at the end (hide spoiler)] . I was not fond of any other characters or anything else in the story. Which was far, far, too long.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Maria Zbroy

    «Магія! Так ось на що вона подібна! Не дивно, що чарівники не мають сексуальних розваг! Ринсвід, звісно, знав, що таке оргазми, кілька разів і сам їх пережив, траплялося, що навіть не наодинці, та ніщо з його життєвого досвіду не можна було порівняти з тим напруженим, пристрасним моментом, коли кожен нерв у його тілі заструменів біло-блакитними іскрами, і груба магічна сила порснула з кінчиків його пальців. Вона наповнює тебе і виносить на гребінь навальної пінистої хвилі розбурханої стихії, з як «Магія! Так ось на що вона подібна! Не дивно, що чарівники не мають сексуальних розваг! Ринсвід, звісно, знав, що таке оргазми, кілька разів і сам їх пережив, траплялося, що навіть не наодинці, та ніщо з його життєвого досвіду не можна було порівняти з тим напруженим, пристрасним моментом, коли кожен нерв у його тілі заструменів біло-блакитними іскрами, і груба магічна сила порснула з кінчиків його пальців. Вона наповнює тебе і виносить на гребінь навальної пінистої хвилі розбурханої стихії, з якого ти м‘яко скочуєшся донизу. Не дивно, що чарівники борються за цю силу...» Ох вже цей Пратчетт, вміє закрутити і здивувати! І не лише таким відвертим пасажем: якщо ви читали «Колір магії», де починаються пригоди чарівника Ринсвінда, то знаєте, що чарівник із нього ніякий. Ба більше: заклинання він знає лише одне, та й те випадково «вскочило» йому в голову. У «Химерному сяйві» подорож Ринсвінда, Двоцвіта і Багажа Диском продовжується, і героям стає справді спекотно. А як інакше, коли на небі з‘являється лиховісна червона зоря, яка щоночі більшає, і загрожує Дискосвіту знищенням? Та найбільше Ринсвінда непокоїть той факт, що він і заклинання, яке засіло в закамарках його свідомості, якось причетні до катаклізма, і саме недолугий чарівник має стати тим, хто врятує Диск від неминучої загибелі. Ця частина мені сподобалась значно більше, ніж перша. Герої нарешті класно жартують, автор іронізує ледь не на кожній сторінці, а завдяки вдалому перекладу кожна сторінка ніби постає перед очима. Якщо раптом ви ще думали, чи варто продовжувати читати про пригоди Ринсвінда - однозначно «так»! І, наостанок, моя улюблена цитата з книги: «Описати те, як впливає повітря Анк-Морпорка на гостей міста, можна тільки одним-єдиним способом, за аналогією. Візьміть шотландський плед. Посипте його конфеті. Підсвітіть його стробоскопом. Тепер візьміть хамелеона. Покладіть хамелеона на плед. Уважно за ним спостерігайте. Тепер розумієте?»

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    If you read The Color of Magic, you most probably got this book as the the one preceding it (the aforementioned The Color of Magic) ended with Rincewind falling off the edge of the Discworld.... talk about a "cliff-hanger ending". In this one we'll go from there to what could be the end of the Discworld itself and possibly, well everything else. It all depends on Rincewind....scary thought that. "Synopsisizers" (I believe I just made that word up, so bear with me, please) anyway, "the people who If you read The Color of Magic, you most probably got this book as the the one preceding it (the aforementioned The Color of Magic) ended with Rincewind falling off the edge of the Discworld.... talk about a "cliff-hanger ending". In this one we'll go from there to what could be the end of the Discworld itself and possibly, well everything else. It all depends on Rincewind....scary thought that. "Synopsisizers" (I believe I just made that word up, so bear with me, please) anyway, "the people who write synopses" love to say books (and for that matter movies, TV programs, songs, poems, and everthing else) are "irreverent". They think this will appeal to the rebel in each of us I suppose. In this case Pratchett's writings do tend to skewer "dogmas" but he does it pretty much across the board getting the irreligious as well as the religious. I'm a Christian and haven't found myself "outraged" to the point of hurling the book across the room or anything. I enjoy Sir Terry's work and while I'd probably disagree with him across the board on spiritual matters, I think I'd like him. I think that most anyone with an open mind (and maybe are sure what they themselves actually believe and realize that this is that arcane "thing" called "humor")can enjoy the Discworld books.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Manny

    Several of the other reviewers have singled out for special praise the Xena parody with the more appropriately dressed warrior princess. She was indeed very fine, but my personal favorite was the bit where the Stonehenge-type astronomical ritual unexpectedly develops a glitch. "Looks like software incompatibility!" says the know-it-all Neolithic geek. "The Spiral Chant doesn't work on concentric circles!" And, while we're on rocks, I also loved the trolls, harking back to their glory days in earl Several of the other reviewers have singled out for special praise the Xena parody with the more appropriately dressed warrior princess. She was indeed very fine, but my personal favorite was the bit where the Stonehenge-type astronomical ritual unexpectedly develops a glitch. "Looks like software incompatibility!" says the know-it-all Neolithic geek. "The Spiral Chant doesn't work on concentric circles!" And, while we're on rocks, I also loved the trolls, harking back to their glory days in earlier geological eras. "Ah, back then you were igneous or nothing," one of them sighs. "But now, let's face it, we're all getting a bit metamorphic..." Yes... when you think about it, it must be rather frightening for a troll to realize that, oh my God, I'm already 500 million years old, where did all the time go?

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cathy (cathepsut)

    This is not for me anymore. 15 years ago I read the first handful of Discworld books and liked them well enough. But even then this type of comedic writing wasn't really my cup of tea. Now it definitely isn't. Too little plot, too absurd. I laughed a few times, but the story did not engage me much. My favourite scene was Death learning how how to play Bridge. The druids were fun. And the bits with the trolls. Cohen was a great character. The idea behind the Discworld is a great one and I heard goo This is not for me anymore. 15 years ago I read the first handful of Discworld books and liked them well enough. But even then this type of comedic writing wasn't really my cup of tea. Now it definitely isn't. Too little plot, too absurd. I laughed a few times, but the story did not engage me much. My favourite scene was Death learning how how to play Bridge. The druids were fun. And the bits with the trolls. Cohen was a great character. The idea behind the Discworld is a great one and I heard good things about the later books. One of them is one my shelf and I will have a go at it later this year. Who knows, I might like it better.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Barry Pierce

    This is reminded me of just how great Terry Pratchett is. His writing and humour is just fabulous and his characters are brilliant. However the plot of this novel is quite reminiscent of a wet tea towel. It doesn't hold a flame to The Colour of Magic and I'm quite glad that Pratchett gave up on the idea of doing sequels after this novel. It's overall very meh with a sprinkling of ugh.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tfitoby

    Unseen University but not as you know it. With my awful and dreaded exercise regime continuing so too does my revisit to the early works of the Discworld thanks to the readings of Nigel Planer. Rincewind, last seen falling off of the disc has been saved from certain death once more thanks to spoilers that won't be mentioned and now must save the disc from a fiery death and evil wizards. The problem with going back to these early novels is that things arenlt as you remember them. It's like an altern Unseen University but not as you know it. With my awful and dreaded exercise regime continuing so too does my revisit to the early works of the Discworld thanks to the readings of Nigel Planer. Rincewind, last seen falling off of the disc has been saved from certain death once more thanks to spoilers that won't be mentioned and now must save the disc from a fiery death and evil wizards. The problem with going back to these early novels is that things arenlt as you remember them. It's like an alternate universe where everything is the same only slightly different. Ridcully is beyond larger than life in the later novels and the supporting cast of wizards rounder, more interesting, so that this early incarnation of the internal politics of the wizards feels a bit silly. The same can be said for the trolls too. They're not the same entities from Thud for example. That aside this is a jolly good romp through fantasy cliches and a not so subtle critique of the weaknesses of the masses in the grip of fear. The pairing of Rincewind and Twoflower continue to grow dynamically and the development of the luggage as an actual character is fun to read. Added to the ensemble this time is the legendary hero Cohen The Barbarian and his virgin wife Bethan who provide an extra dimension of fun. Cohen and the trip to the Domain of Death stand out as high points for me and help this second book in the series to surpass The Colour of Magic in terms of pleasure and entertainment.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Anuradha

    I didn't think it could get better than the first one, but oh, it got monumentally better so. Pro tip: you're going to have to read the second one right after the first, because it really won't make sense otherwise. Full RTC.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    I didn't really care for The Colour of Magic. So I wasn't sure what to expect from The Light Fantastic, but I figured either it would be more of the same, or slightly better. And thankfully, it was slightly better. There was a plot! (Of sorts.) And a single storyline! (Mostly.) And humor! (I lol'ed once.) All are things that Colour didn't have - at least not in my opinion. But I can't say that I loved Light. I'm thinking that it might just be me, though. I like humor, and I even like bizarre rand I didn't really care for The Colour of Magic. So I wasn't sure what to expect from The Light Fantastic, but I figured either it would be more of the same, or slightly better. And thankfully, it was slightly better. There was a plot! (Of sorts.) And a single storyline! (Mostly.) And humor! (I lol'ed once.) All are things that Colour didn't have - at least not in my opinion. But I can't say that I loved Light. I'm thinking that it might just be me, though. I like humor, and I even like bizarre randomness... to a point. I can't help but feel like this whole world is just centered around silliness for its own sake, and I like my humor to be a little more measured and intentional than that. I found myself laughing at the humor and one-liners in the dialogue, and rolling my eyes at the whimsy of everything else. I just... don't care for that. I need rules and to understand how the world works - and apparently in Discworld, anything and everything is possible. It makes me twitchy. Maybe I'll adjust and adapt to it, because at this point I do intend to continue the series. At least until the twitching starts to affect my health, and then I'll call it quits.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Straub

    Terry Prarchett is quickly becoming one of my favorite authors. Not only are the stories rich, funny, and enjoyable, but the format of the storytelling itself adds a whole separate dimension to the books. Pratchett clearly has an incredible understanding of, and love affair with, the English language, and that makes me not want to put these books down. From spending two pages arguing with the reader about why the female barbarian does not wear impractical sexy barbarian clothes, to subtle word ga Terry Prarchett is quickly becoming one of my favorite authors. Not only are the stories rich, funny, and enjoyable, but the format of the storytelling itself adds a whole separate dimension to the books. Pratchett clearly has an incredible understanding of, and love affair with, the English language, and that makes me not want to put these books down. From spending two pages arguing with the reader about why the female barbarian does not wear impractical sexy barbarian clothes, to subtle word games that not only work in the story but, when caught, made me laugh out loud, the entire book was incredible. Here are some of the many little gems hidden in there: “Necrotelecomnicon,” said the dwarf. “Wizards use it. It’s how you contact the dead, I think. “… there was a whole bunch of people across the street helping themselves to musical instruments, can you believe that?” “Yeah,” said Rincewind. “Luters, I expect.” “… while grinning like a necrophiliac in a morgue.” Just awesome.

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